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LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY, MASS. 



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Htncoln public Iftrar? 

November 1984 



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in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/townreport19831984linc 



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Pen and ink drawing of Sandy Pond and surrounding shore b; 
Susanna Schlintz. Much of the land area is part of the r< 
acquisition by the Town of the Sandy Pond Trust land. 

Pen and ink drawing of the Lincoln Boat Club clubhouse by 
Susanna Schlintz, from a photograph taken around the turn 
the century. The clubhouse was built on the shores of San« 
Pond in the 1890' s and contained a boat house on the lowerl 
level and a dance hall on the floor above. Behind the club- 
house was an ice house, built in 1910 when ice harvesting] 
became popular on the pond. 



REPORT 
of the 
OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 

of the 
TOWN OF LINCOLN 



FOR THE YEAR 1983 




Lincoln, Massachusetts 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page. 



TOWN CALENDAR 
GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Board of Selectmen 1 

Officers and Committees 5 

Town Clerk 18 

FINANCE 

Town Treasurer 52 

Town Accountant 57 

Board of Assessors 71 

Collector of Taxes 74 

PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 

Fire and Police Departments 75 

Inspectors of Building, Wiring and Plumbing 78 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 80 

HEALTH AND WELFARE 

Board of Health 81 

Council on Aging 84 

Dog Officer 87 

North East Solid Waste Committee 88 

PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 

Planning Board 90 

Board of Appeals 94 

Conservation Commission 96 

Land Use Conference Committee 99 

North Lincoln Study Committee 102 

Lincoln Land Conservation Trust 103 

Housing Commission 106 

Energy Committee 109 

Water Commissioners 110 

Public Works 113 

Pierce Property Committee 115 

Cemetery Commissioners 116 

Celebrations Committee 117 

Historical Commission 118 

Historic District Commission 119 

Codman Community Farms 120 

Cable Television Committee 123 

Underground Wiring Committee 128 

Winter Street Task Force 129 



LIBRARY, RECREATION AND SCHOOLS 

Page 

Lincoln Public Library 131 

DeCordova Museum & Park 139 

Bemis Lecture Trustees 153 

Recreation Committee 154 

Lincoln Youth Committee 155 

Codman Pool Committee 157 

Elementary School Committee 158 

Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School Committee 165 

Lincoln Scholarship Committee 177 

Lincoln-Sudbury Regional Scholarship Fund Committee 178 

Minuteman Regional Vocational Technical School District 179 

VITAL STATISTICS 

Vital Statistics 187 

Valuation List 194 

Commissioners of Trust Funds 232 



TOWN CALENDAR 



SELECTMEN 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

WATER COMMISSIONERS 
BOARD OF HEALTH 
PLANNING BOARD 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

POPULATION 
TOWN AREA 
1983-84 TAX RATE 
ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

ANNUAL ELECTION OF OFFICERS 

QUALIFICATIONS FOR 
REGISTRATION 

REGISTERED VOTERS 

TOWN OFFICES 



--Every Monday evening, 7:30 p.m. 
Town Offices Building 259-8850 

— Every other Monday evening, 8; 00 p.m. 
Super intendant's Office 259-9400 

— For appointments call Town Offices 
Building, 259-8850 

--Meetings by appointment 

--Meetings by appointment 

--Every other Wednesday evening, 
8:00 p.m. Town Offices Building, 
259-8850 

--First and third Wednesdays of each 
month, 8:00 p.m. Town Offices 
Building 259-8850 

--5,210 (Town Census) 

--14.56 square miles 

--$16.40 

— Saturday before the last Monday in 
March - March 24, 1984 

— Last Monday in March - March 26, 1984 

— Residence in Town of Lincoln 

— 3,129 (As of May 12, 1983) 

— Open Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. 
to 4:30 p.m. (Closed Saturdays) 
Telephone 259-8850 



General Government 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

John R. Caswell 
John A. Ritsher 
Ann F. Sutherland, Chairman 



The dominant issues for Lincoln in 1983 were without question related 
to roads and traffic. A town-wide Land Use Conference held on October 19 
provided a forum for discussing these as well as other problems facing the 
town at present and in the future. The aim of the conference, organized 
under the guidance of the Planning Board, was to ascertain citizens' 
preferences on the direction of town policy in regards to roads, housing, 
open space, and the future of the North Lincoln area in particular. 

The Selectmen were particularly interested in determing if a majority 
of residents still shared the Town boards' long held goal of relocating 
Route 2 to the north. With the return to the governorship of Michael 
Dukakis in January, we were once again faced with the policies of 
Secretary of Transportation and Construction Frederick Salvucci, an 
outspoken opponent of a northern relocation. Furthermore, the safety 
improvements promised under the previous Dukakis administration had still 
not been realized despite the unrelentingly high accident rate on Route 2 
in Lincoln (71 accidents with 18 injuries and 3 deaths in 1983). A ray of 
hope appeared in December, however, with the news that state contracts had 
been awarded for the redesign of the Bedford Road intersection and design 
of Route 2 with a median barrier from Bedford Road east to Route 128. The 
timetable for the project indicated construction would not begin until 
1985, but the Selectmen have requested that the deadline be moved forward 
to 1984. 

The source of the other principal road related problem lies just 
beyond our boundaries. Traffic projections clearly show that the Bay 
Colony office park development on Winter Street in Waltham next to the 
Lincoln line will have a significant impact on town roads. During the 
year the Selectmen have worked closely with the Winter Street Task Force 
in developing plans for mitigating the expected impacts. The Annual Town 
Meeting voted to authorize the Selectmen to initiate the closing of Winter 
Street at the Waltham line if such action were deemed advisable. 

The Task Force subsequently organized a team of volunteers who 
conducted a detailed traffic count as well as an origin and destination 
study to learn the nature of current traffic patterns. This data was then 
analyzed by traffic consultant Walter Freemen in an excellent report of 

1 



probable impacts. One of the interesting but not surprising facts that 
emerged from the study is the extent to which many motorists prefer to 
traverse Lincoln roads rather than be subjected to delays and risks on 
Route 2. Further assessments of the ramifications of closing Winter 
Street will be necessary before rendering a decision to begin legal 
proceedings . 

At year's end, the task force was moving forward on a number of 
fronts and should be congratulated for their thoroughness and dedication. 
Their efforts have convinced the Selectmen and the Planning Board of the 
desirability of establishing a permanent Traffic Management Committee to 
deal with long-term planning in that domain. 

We can report progress on at least one road issue. After years of 
delay and decay the portion of Bedford Road from the Town Hill to the 
Library will be reconstructed. The project, which is to be 75% state 
funded, was approved by the Special Town Meeting in November and will 
commence in the summer of 1984. 

Town Office Modifications 

As the Town boards and staff settled into their new offices in the 
former Center School, it became evident that a number of alterations would 
be necessary. The foremost of these was the front entrance to the 
building, which had been reconstructed to provide access for wheel chairs, 
but in the process had been rendered more inaccessible for persons who walk 
with difficulty. A redesign of the entrance area to accomodate parking 
spaces for the handicapped was drawn up and approved in concept, but met 
with opposition once under construction. The Selectmen subsequently 
settled the "Great Wall" debate with a compromise plan which revised the 
dimensions of the retaining wall necessitated by the changes in elevation 
for the special parking. Winter weather set in before the project could 
be completed in November, but as soon as conditions permit, the construc- 
tion and landscaping work will be resumed. 

The interior to the building proved more amenable to our needs, 
although the initial year's occupancy indicates that further rearrangement 
of some office space will be necessary. The consolidation of all town 
office personnel in one central location has greatly enhanced day-to-day 
operations and resulted in some changes in staff responsibilities. 
Nevertheless, in order to meet the ever-expanding work load and the 
demands of a growing number of very active Town committees, it has been 
necessary to add part-time personnel. With the unexpected retirement in 
1984 of Elizabeth Snelling, who has labored countless hours on a volunteer 
basis in her capacity as Town Clerk, still more assistance will be needed 
next year. 

The acquisition of a word processor provided a boost to office 
efficiency and futher automation may be forthcoming in the next year or 
two. The Selectmen now have under consideration a proposal made by two 
interested citizens, Robert Pinto and Robert Wolf. They recommended the 
installation of a network of minicomputers for use in all facets of town 
office operations. Such a network could include the fire and police and 
public works departments as well. 

2 



Even while envisioning the latest technological advances, we never- 
theless had to deal with more mundane matters in our new quarters. The 
cupola atop the Town Offices building required extensive and expensive 
emergency repairs, at a cost of $20,000, with further repairs to the roof 
area slated for 1984. With the completion of the energy improvements, we 
anticipate realizing considerable savings in fuel in this and other Town 
buildings during the 1983-84 heating season. 

Through the generosity of the Donaldson family, the hearing room was 
handsomely refurbished with chestnut paneling, carpeting, chairs and a 
handcrafted chestnut conference table. The chestnut had been milled from 
trees feeled by the hurricane of 1938 and stored by the Donaldsons in the 
intervening years. 

An informal dedication took place in late November with the 
presentation of a plaque bearing the inscription, "This conference room 
was given in memory of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Donaldson by their family for 
their many years of dedicated service to the town and to its people". The 
room will serve as a fitting and greatly appreciated tribute to both of 
them. Our only regret was that their son, Dr. Gordon Donaldson, could not 
witness the culmination of these plans. "Butch", long-time member of the 
Board of Health, died suddenly in September and will be sorely missed. 

Departmental Activities 

The several departments under our jurisdiction have, in our view, 
continued to function well, but the fiscal restraints imposed by 
Proposition 2 1/2 have begun to impact the delivery of services. Although 
Lincoln's population has remained relatively stable in recent years, the 
number of households has increased markedly and concurrently the demand 
for greater fire and police protection has also risen. The 1984 Annual 
Town Meeting will therefore be asked to approve the addition of personnel 
in both the fire and police departments. We are optimistic that the 
proposal will be adopted. 

The Department of Public Works devoted roughly 2000 man hours to the 
removal of 300+ dead and diseased roadside trees during the 1983 fiscal 
year. The high mortality rate was due larely to the recent gypsy moth 
infestations and the extensive cutting caused concern among residents. In 
response to their concerns, the Selectmen declared a six-month moratorium 
on roadside cutting in April to permit re-examination of the condition of 
trees marked for removal. The moratorium was lifted after Tree Warden Ron 
Wood had certified that the trees in question were indeed dead or dying. 
He has planned an accelerated tree planting program in order to compensate 
for the substantial losses of the last few years. 

It has also become apparent that our tree program has been seriously 
deficient in pruning and other live tree care. The Annual Town Meeting 
will therefore be asked to consider purchasing a bucket truck to 
facilitate this work and other projects for which areial access is 
necessary. 



Enforcing the zoning by-laws has occupied a substantial portion of 
the Building Inspector's time. Under the Selectmen's direction, he has 
levied fines for violations, a practice which has become increasingly 
effective despite some collection problems. 

New Initiatives and Sustained Endeavors 

Early in the year, a group of interested parents approached the 
Selectmen to ask their support in creating a playground for pre-school 
children. The Board met frequently with members of the group and assisted 
them in developing their plans. We have wholeheartedly endorsed their 
efforts and have contributed $3,000 to the project from the Donald Gordon 
Recreation Fund. At year's end, a portion of the planned structures had 
been installed adjacent to the Brooks field house parking lot, with com- 
pletion expected in the spring of 1984. 

In April, at the recommendation of the ad-hoc Cable Television 
Committee, the Selectmen initiated the formal cable licensing process. 
The original committee's membership was augmented and it became the 
official Cable T.V. Advisory Committee under the chairmanship of Steve 
Low. The group has worked diligently and with admirable thoroughness in 
preparing their report. It will be the responsibility of the Selectmen as 
the licensing authority, however, to reach a decision amongst the three 
applicants some time in the next year. 

On the regional level, NESWC (the North East Solid Waste Committee) 
was finally able to break ground for the new resource recovery plant in 
North Andover. It is expected to be on line in 1985, at which time 
Lincoln will begin transporting its refuse to the facility. 

In December, the Hanscom Area Traffic Study Committee received the 
draft report of the feasibility study being conducted by the Central 
Transportation Planning Staff. The recommendations of that study will 
guide the committee in reaching decisions on possible solutions to traffic 
congestion in that area. This work, together with the information gathered 
for the 1983 Land Use Conference, will form a sound base for consideration 
by the Traffic Management Committee. 

Efforts of Other Boards 

The Selectmen would like to congratulate several Town boards and 
committees in addition to those already cited for their achievements in 
1983: the North Lincoln Study Committee for its excellent report 
incorporated in the Land Conference booklet; the Land Use Conference 
Committee itself for planning and realizing a highly successful day; the 
Conservation Commission for its remarkable fundraising toward the purchase 
of the Sandy Pond Trust land; the Housing Commission for its tireless 
efforts to provide diversity in housing, culminating in approval of a plan 
for congregate living at the Codman Farmhouse; the Board of Health for its 
sensitive handling of the controversial issue of mosquito control under 
the threat of an outbreak of Eastern equine encephalitis; and the newly 
reconstituted and revitalized Recreation Committee for preparing an 
excellent recreation bulletin. Without the continued efforts of such 
dedicated volunteers, Lincoln could not remain the vital, forward thinking 
and fascinating community that it is. 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEE 

MODERATOR Term Expires 

David Donaldson 1984 

TOWN CLERK 

Elizabeth J. Snelling 1984 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

John R. Caswell 1986 

John A. Ritsher 1985 

Ann F. Sutherland, Chairman 1984 

TOWN TREASURER 

Roy M. Raja 1984 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Douglas M. Burckett, Chairman 1984 

Joseph W. Howard 1985 

Paul Marsh 1984 

COLLECTOR OF TAXES 

Roy M. Raja 1984 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Paula Bennett 1984 

Elizabeth Corcoran, Chairman 1984 

Eleanor Gallitano 1985 

Wilson C. Hayes 1986 

Joan Walker 1986 

WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Stuart B, Avery, Jr., Chairman (deceased) 1984 

Robert DeNormandie 1986 

Gabriel Farrell 1985 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

George P. Faddoul, D.V.M. 1985 

John M. O'Loughlin, M.D. 1986 

William B. Stason, M.D., Chairman 1984 



REGIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Richard Brooks, Chairman 
Alan Cherish 
Raymond P. Clarke 
Lynn Donaldson 
Alan H. Grathvohl 
William A. King 



1986 
1985 
1984 
1985 
1984 
1986 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 



James DeNormandie, Chairman 
Marjorie Holland 
H. Arnold MacLean 



1986 
1984 
1985 



PLANNING BOARD 



F. Douglas Adams 
Basil C, Chigas 
William G. Constable 
Rosamond P. Delori, Chairman 
Warren F. Flint, Jr. 



1988 
1986 
1984 
1985 
1987 



Henry Morgan 



MEASURER OF WOOD AND BARK 



COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 



1984 



George Hibben 
Virginia M. Niles 
William B. Russell 



1985 
1986 
1984 



TRUSTEES OF BEMIS FUND 



Saville Davis 
Amalie Kass 
Margaret Touborg 



1984 
1986 
1985 



TRUSTEES OF LINCOLN LIBRARY 



David Ford, Chairman 

Douglas Harding 

Mary Newman 

Carolyn Birmingham (School Committee's Appointee) 

Eleanor H. Fitzgerald (Elected by Town) 

Robert Shenton (Selectmen's Appointee) 



self -perpetuating 
ii ii 



1985 
1986 
1984 



DECORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 
"A" Directors 

John H. Cant 1 in 1987 

John French 1986 

Walter J. Salmon 1984 

Dorothy Thompson (resigned) 1985 

Stephen S. Manos (appointed) 1985 

"B" Directors 

Oven Beenhouver (School Committee's Appointee) 1986 

Barbara Sisson (Library Trustees Appointee) 1985 

Margaret Wengren (Selectmen's Appointee) 1984 

LINCOLN ARTS COUNCIL 

Owen Beenhouwer (School Committee's Appointee) 
Irene Briedis (Elected by DeCordova Corp.) 
Julia Pugh (Lincoln Member of the Assoc. Council) 
Barbara Sisson (Library Trustee's Appointee) 
Margaret Wengren (Selectmen's Appointee) 



HOUSING COMMISSION 

Raymond Johnson 1984 

Mary Helen Lorenz 1985 

Katherine S. McHugh 1986 

William B. Russell 1986 

Elizabeth J. Snelling, Chairman 1984 

RECREATION COMMITTEE 

Sarah Bobbit (resigned/ elected post) 1984 

D'Arcy MacMahon (interim appointment/ elected post) 1984 

Kenneth Laurence (resigned/elected post) 1986 

Susan Harding (interim appointment/ elected post) 1984 

Conrad H. Todd, Chairman (Elected) 1985 
Monika Duborg (interim appointment/Selectmen's appointee) 1984 

George W. Seeley (Selectmen's Appointee) 1985 

Mary Silverstein (resigned/Selectmen's Appointee) 1984 

John Walker (Selectmen's Appointee) 1985 



TREE WARDEN 
Ronald Wood 1984 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 
APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



William G. Hinchey 



EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



Betty L. Lang 



Virginia M. Niles 



William N. Swift 



Frank C . Emmons , Jr . 



ASSISTANT EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 



TOWN COUNSEL 



TOWN ENGINEER 



Term Expires 

1984 

1984 

1984 

1984 



Richard P. Carroll 



DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS 



CHIEF OF POLICE 



Dominick James Arena 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE-PROSECUTOR 



Charles E. Doyle 



David Davis 



Barbara Bardsley 
Donald Bardsley 
Allen Bowles 
David Eysie 
David Finan 
John Fitzgerald 
Richard J. Hallett 
Kevin Mooney 
Thomas Mo ran 



POLICE SERGEANT 



POLICE OFFICERS 



1984 



1984 



1984 



1984 



1984 



1984 
1984 
1984 
1984 
1984 
1984 
1984 
1984 
1984 



CONSTABLES 

Dominick James Arena 1984 

Charles E. Doyle 1984 



DOG OFFICER 
Jennifer Pettit 1984 

FIRE CHIEF 
Dominick James Arena 1984 

FOREST WARDEN 
Dominick James Arena 1984 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 
Ernest L. Johnson 1984 

BUILDING INSPECTOR 
Ernest L. Johnson 1984 

WIRING INSPECTOR 
Kenneth Desmond 1984 

PLUMBING INSPECTOR 
Russell J. Dixon 1984 

DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE & EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 
Thomas B. Moran 1984 

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE & EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 
William G. Hinchey 1984 

COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER 
Eric Williams 1984 

ASSISTANT COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER 
Curtis Risley 1984 



HAZARDOUS WASTE COORDIKATOR 

Richard Goddard 1984 

VETERAN'S AGENT 

William B. Whalen 1984 

VETERAN'S GRAVE OFFICER 

William B. Whalen 1984 

TOWN HISTORIAN 

Margaret M. Martin 1984 

REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 

Kerrie Luce (resigned) 1986 

Peggy Elliot (appointed) 1986 

William G. Langton 1985 

Eleanor M. Wilfert 1984 
Elizabeth J. Snelling, ex officio 

COUNCIL ON AGING 



Edgar Barr (deceased) 1985 

Elizabeth Kershaw (appointed) 1985 

Clifford Bowles 1984 

Beverly Eckhardt 1984 

Mary Ford 1985 

Harry Healy, Jr. 1984 

Sally Mansfield 1986 

John Manzelli 1986 

Ann Paddock 1985 

Natalie Rudin, Chairperson 1985 

Aire-Maija Schwann 1986 
Frederick B. Taylor, member emeritus 

MINUTEMAN HOME CARE CORPORATION 

Beverly Eckhardt, Chairman 1986 

Miriam Korhonen, Alternate 1986 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

John Quincy Adams, Chairman 1985 

Kenneth Bassett 1984 

Joseph Bower 1984 

Lydia H. Dane 1984 

John Lee 1986 

Robert Mack 1985 

William J. Rizzo, Jr. 1986 

10 



LINCOLN HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

John Carman, Chairman 1986 

Robert A. Cunningham 1984 

Elizabeth Donaldson 1986 

Paul Marsh 1984 

Colin Smith 1985 

PIERCE PROPERTY COMMITTEE 

Joanna Bradshaw (resigned) 1985 

Lynn Donaldson 1984 

Margaret Flint 1985 

John French, Chairman 1986 

Margot Lindsay 1984 

William Shea ' 1985 

REPRESENTATIVE TO HANSCOM FIELD ADVISORY COMMISSION 

Tom Kennedy 1984 

REPRESENTATIVE TO MBTA ADVISORY BOARD 

Peter Braun 1984 

Katherine McHugh, Alternate 1984 

REPRESENTATIVE ON WALDEN POND BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

John Quincy Adams 1984 

REPRESENTATIVE TO MAPC 

William Constable 1984 

REPRESENTATIVE TO MIDDLESEX COUNTY ADVISORY BOARD 

Ann F. Sutherland 

REPRESENTATIVE TO NORTH EAST SOLID WASTE COMMITTEE 

Henry Rugo 1984 

REPRESENTATIVE TO 
VOCATIONAL REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT COMMITTEE 

Harold Levey 1984 

REPRESENTATIVES TO CONCORD-ASSABET COUNCIL FOR CHILDREN 

Nancy Donaldson 1984 

Monika Duborg 1984 



11 



BOARD OF APPEALS 

Jane Cooper Brayton 1985 

James McHugh, Chairman 1987 

D'Arcy MacMahon 1984 

Mary W. Sheldon 1988 

David F. Sykes 1986 

Morton Braun, Associate Member 1984 

Margaret Marsh, Associate Member 1986 

CELEBRATIONS COMMITTEE 

Denise Bienfang 1985 

Karen Boyce 1984 

Denise Dean 1985 

Robert Dean (resigned) 1985 

Henry Morgan 1986 

Jeffrey Mudge 1984 

ENERGY COMMITTEE 

Becky Bartovics, Chairman 1986 

Sam Donnell 1985 

Margaret Hubbard 1986 

Peter Rothstein 1984 
Pamela Reiser, ex officio 

Charles Resnick 1986 

LINCOLN AFFIRMATIVE ACTION COMMITTEE 

Susan Brooks 1984 

Carmela D'Elia 1984 

George Faddoul 1984 

Cecilia Ives 1984 

Lex Taylor 1984 

Pat Morse 1984 

SWIMMING POOL COMMITTEE 

Karen Boyce 1986 

Richard P. Carroll 1985 

Richard Goddard 1986 

Susan Harding, Chairman 1984 

Stephen Neubeck 1986 

Diane F. Nockles 1985 

Paul Rosen 1985 

Louise Toler 1984 



12 






PUBLIC SAFETY BOARD 



ames Far an 
Glen Gustavson 
Thomas Kershaw 

John Stevenson, Vice-Chairman 
J. Michael Tannert, Vice-Chairman 



1984 
1985 
1985 
1985 
1985 



Terry Fenton 
John Goodrich 
John Hammond 
Margot Lindsay 
Agnes Wiggin 
Richard Wiggin 
Jim White 



Jack Carver 
Gabe Farrell 
James G. Flynn 
Josephine Gump 
John Klobuchar 
Stephen Low 
Nathan Parke 
James Pettee 
Michael Simon 
Joseph Rosen 
Robert Wolf 



WINTER STREET TASK FORCE 



CABLE T.V. ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



ETHICS COMMITTEE 



Kenneth Bergen 
Nancy Caskey 
Prise ilia Damon 
Ann Gannett 
Robert Gargill 
Josephine Gump 



UNDERGROUND WIRING COMMITTEE 



John H. Boyer 

Martha DeNormandie 

Gordon Donaldson (deceased) 

Gabe Farrell 

Rudolph Litte 

Peter Von Mertens 



13 



SPECIAL POLICE 

Term Expires 

Leo Algeo 1984 

Gary Bardsley 1984 

Raymond Barnes 1984 

Robert Bates 1984 

Robert Benson 1984 

Richard Carroll 1984 

Frank Caruso 1984 

Francis C. Cartaglia 1984 

Edward Chisholm 1984 

John Ciraso 1984 

Arthur Cotoni 1984 

Joseph Cotoni, Sr. 1984 

Barbara Dane 1984 

Lorraine Dean 1984 

William Dean 1984 

Peter Dewey 1984 

William Doherty 1984 

John Doyle 1984 

Neil Duane 1984 

Robert Dubreuil 1984 

Sean Feeney 1984 

Richard Goddard 1984 

Frank Gordon, Jr. 1984 

Frank Gordon, Sr. 1984 

Richard Hodgson 1984 

George Hofferty 1984 

Christopher Ireland 1984 

Jeffrey Joachim 1984 

Thomas M. Judge 1984 

Herbert Kelley, Jr. 1984 

John Kelly 1984 

John Lee 1984 

Steven Lennon 1984 

Gerald Mahoney, Jr. 1984 

David Maher 1984 

Robert Marshall 1984 

Paul McGovern 1984 

Hazel Mclnnis 1984 

John McLellan 1984 

Gerald F. Mullen 1984 

Dennis Murphy 1984 

Mary Murphy 1984 

Charles O'Loughlin 1984 

John O'Loughlin 1984 

William Orpik 1984 

Theodore Poulos 1984 

Mary Ellen Reardon 1984 

Nathalie Rice 1984 

Lucienne Roat 1984 

William Ryan 1984 

W. Royce Taylor 1984 

George Thomas 1984 

Walter Van Wart 1984 

14 



SPECIAL POLICE 

(cont.) Term Expires 

Charles Walsh 1984 

David Whalen 1984 

William Whalen, Jr. 1984 

William Whalen, Sr. 1984 

Eric Williams 1984 

George Yore 1984 

Stephen Ziegler 1984 

(All of the below are Natural Resources Officers who are made 

special in order to legally issue tickets at Walden Pond.) 



Denis Brennan 1984 

William T. Connor 1984 

Emmet Dickman 1984 

William Erikson 1984 

Gerald Kulesa 1984 

Daniel Lemerise 1984 

Alan McGrory 1984 

Joseph Paolilla 1984 

Thomas Rabbitt 1984 

John Tobin 1984 

David Williams 1984 



APPOINTED BY THE TOWN CLERK 

ASSISTANT TOWN CLERKS 

Florence Caras 1984 

Nancy J. Zuelke 1984 

APPOINTED BY THE COLLECTOR OF TAXES 

ASSISTANT COLLECTOR OF TAXES 

Madge K. Fisher 1984 

APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF HEALTH 

BURIAL AGENT 

Elizabeth J. Snelling 1984 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 

Jennifer Pettit 1984 



15 



APPOINTED BY THE MODERATOR 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Paul Cook 1985 

David Elwood 1984 

Hamilton James 1985 

Sarah Cannon Ho Id en, Chairman 1984 

Bruce Long 1986 

Lawrence Thompson 1986 

Harriet Todd 1986 

PERSONNEL BOARD 

Agnes Wiggin 1985 

Joanne Had lock 1986 

Virginia Vockel, Chairman 1984 

APPOINTED BY THE PLANNING BOARD 

LONG RANGE PLANNING COMMITTEE 

Jane Carlson 
Perry Culver 
John Hammond 
Robert Pinto 
Diana Smith 
Robert G. Wolf 

BICYCLE PATH COMMITTEE 

Robert A. Cunningham, Co-Chairman 

Alice Emery 

Faith Rugo 

Jane Solar 

Linda Svetz, Co-Chairman 



SIGN COMMITTEE 



Sheila Harding 
John Lee (resigned) 
Barry Solar, Chairman 



NORTH LINCOLN STUDY COMMITTEE 



John Caswell 
Basil Chigas 
Warren Flint, Jr. 
Raymond Johnson 
Bob Lemire, Chairman 
Bob Pinto 
Bill Rizzo 



16 



LAND USE CONFERENCE COMMITTEE 

Susan Fargo, Chairman 
Eleanor Gallitano 
Ann Gannett 
Susan Goodrich 
John Lee 
Richard Reece 
Paul Svetz 
Ruth Wales 

APPOINTED BY VARIOUS BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 

YOUTH COMMITTEE 

Wayne Mount (School Commit tee's Appointee) 1984 

Jane Tatlock (Selectmen's Appointee) 1986 

John Walker (Recreation Committee's Appointee) 1985 

SCHOLARSHIP FUND COMMITTEE 

Deborah C. French (Moderator's Appointee) 1985 

George C. Hibben (Selectmen's Appointee) 1986 

Gail T. Najjar (School Committee's Appointee) 1984 



17 



TOWN CLERK 

Elizabeth J. Snelling 



The Town Clerk is the official recorder of Town events and 
activities and issues licenses and certificates. Her duties in- 
clude recording the proceedings at Town Meetings and Elections, 
and notifying the Selectmen and other officers concerned of appro- 
priations which have been voted. 

The record of registered voters of Lincoln is kept in the 
Town Clerk's office. Persons wishing to become voters in the 
Town should communicate with the Clerk. 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
March 26, 1983 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the meeting was called to 
order by the Moderator, Mr. David M. Donaldson, at 9:35 a.m., and 
a quorum being present, the following business was transacted: 

The Moderator called attention to Article 1 (Election of Offi- 
cers), which will be acted upon on Monday, March 28, 1983, at the 
Smith School Gymnasium, with the polls being open from 7:30 a.m. to 
8 p.m. 

The Moderator then brought before the Meeting consideration of 
those articles which have been placed on the Consent Calendar, copies 
of which were sent to all voters at least seven days before the 
Town Meeting. At the request of two voters, Articles 3 and 8 
respectively were held out; the other articles on the Calendar (2, 
4, 6 and 7) were then unanimously adopted. 

ARTICLE 2 . To bring in their votes for any Committees, Commission- 
ers, Trustees, and other officers required by law to 
be elected by ballot, or otherwise. 

VOTED : (By Consent Calendar) 

That Henry Morgan be elected Measurer of Wood and Bark 
for the ensuing year. 

ARTICLE 3 . To hear and act upon the reports of Town Officers, 
Comm'.ttees, Commissioners and Trustees. 

VOTED : (Unanimously) 

That the reports of the Town Officers, Committees, 

18 



ARTICLE 4 



VOTED: 



Commissioners and Trustees, as printed in the Town 
Report, be accepted. 

To fix the salaries and compensation of the several 

elective officers of the Town and to determine 

whether any Department, Board or Committee shall be 

authorized to employ for additional compensation 

any of its members and to fix additional compensation 

of such members. 

(By Consent Calendar) 

That the salaries of the elected officials of the 

Town for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1983 and 

ending June 30, 1984, be fixed at the following 

amounts: 

Town Clerk $200.00 

Treasurer § Collector 10.00 
Assessors, Chairman 200.00 
Assessors, other members, 

each 175.00 

Water Commissioners, each 75.00 
and that the Board of Assessors is authorized to 
employ one of its members to work on Town mapping and 
additional assessing duties at a salary not to exceed 
$16,000.00 for the said fiscal period. 



ARTICLE 5, 



VOTED 



To raise and appropriate money for the necessary and 

expedient purposes of the Town, or take any other 

action relative thereto. 

(Unanimously, except where otherwise stated) 

That the Town adopt as separate appropriations the 

listed recommendations in Exhibit 2, attached to the 

report of the Finance Committee, printed on pages 15 

through 24, inclusive, of the Financial Section and 

Warrant for the 1983 Town Meeting, except that the 

following: 



Item #301 - Public Works Department - Custom 
Service - will be increased by 
$3,500 to $24,500; (This change 
resulted from an amendment offered 
by the Selectmen) 

Item #502 - School Department - Instruction - 
will be decreased by $700 to 
$1,508,484; 



19 



Item #503 - School Department - Other School 
Services - will be decreased by 
$13,000 to $137,237; 

Item #510 - Regional High School - to be in- 
creased by $8,703.90 to 
$750,994.76; (This change re- 
sulted from an amendment by the 
Regional School Committee) 

and that all items will be raised by taxation except 
to the following extent and to the extent provided 
in a second motion to be made under this Article: 

Item #15 - Town Offices - Salaries - $20,000 
to be taken from Water Department 
Receipts when received, and $21,500 
to be taken from the Air Force 
School account; 

Item #40 - Conservation - Salaries - $16,500 
to be taken from the Conservation 
Commission Agency Account; 

Item #100 - Police Department - Salaries - 

$49,000 to be taken from the Agency 
Account established for payments 
in lieu of taxes, and $50,000 to 
be taken from Federal Revenue 
Sharing funds; 

Item #102 - Police Department - Cruisers - 

$19,500 to be taken from free cash; 

Item #205 - Animal Officer - Salary and Expense - 
$312 to be taken from the Agency 
Account established for fees re- 
ceived for care and custody of dogs; 

Item #502 - Elementary School - Instruction - 

$93,301 to be taken from Metco funds; 

Item #504 - Elementary School - Operation § 

Maintenance - $152 to be taken from 
the Grammar School Fund, and $1765 
to be taken from the Julian deCor- 
dova School Equipment Fund; 

20 



Item #520 - 



Library - Salaries - $718 to be 
taken from Dog Tax Receipts; 



Item #521 - Library - Books - $3,549 to be 

taken from State Aid to Libraries; 

Item #815 - Swimming Pool Bonds - $10,000 to 
be taken from the Agency Account 
established for funds to be re- 
ceived from the Codman Trustees; 

Item #816 - Interest on Swimming Pool Bonds - 
$920 to be taken from the Agency 
Account established for funds to 
be received from the Codman Trustees; 

Item #819 - Codman Kitchen Bonds - $2,500 to 
be taken from the Agency Account 
established for funds to be re- 
ceived from the Codman Trustees; 

Item #820 - Interest on Codman Kitchen Bonds - 
$431.25 to be taken from the Agency 
Account established for funds to be 
received from the Codman Trustees; 

Item #821 - Codman Barn Repair Loan - $5,000 

to be taken from the Agency Account 
established for funds to be received 
from the Codman Trustees; 

Item #822 - Interest on Codman Barn Repair 

Loan - $1,512.50 to be taken from 
the Agency Account established for 
funds to be received from the Cod- 
man Trustees; 

Reserve Fund - $41,000 to be taken 

from Overlay Reserve; 

Items #950 - #956, inclusive - to be taken from 
Water Department Receipts when re- 
ceived. 

The total for General Purposes for the fiscal 
year beginning July 1, 1983, through June 30, 
1984, is shown as $5,836,544.11, and with the 

21 



amendments listed above is now $5,835,048.01. 
After the application of the special funds as 
listed above, the amount to be raised is 
$5,497,387.26. 

At the conclusion of action on all the articles 
calling for the expenditure of money (after 
Article 35), it was voted unanimously as fol- 
lows (as a second vote under Article 5) : 






VOTED : 



That the sum of $195,500 be taken 
from Free Cash to reduce the total 
amount to be raised by taxation, as 
voted under the first motion under 
this Article 5. 



(This second motion was TABLED following the 
first vote under Article 5 until action on 
Article 35 had been completed.) 

ARTICLE 6 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to 
borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the 
revenue of the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1983, in 
accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 
44, Section 4, as amended, and to issue a note or notes 
therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any 
note or notes as may be given for a period of less 
than one year, in accordance with General Laws, Chap- 
ter 44, Section 17, as amended, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

VOTED : (By consent calendar) 

That the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to borrow 
money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue 
of the financial year beginning July 1, 1983, in accord- 
ance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, 
Section 4, as amended, and to issue a note or notes 
therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any 
note or notes as may be given for a period of less 
than one year, in accordance with General Laws, Chap- 
ter 44, Section 17, as amended. 

ARTICLE 7 . To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Select- 
men and the School Committee to continue the Town's 
annual contract with the Secretary of Defense to oper- 

22 



VOTED: 



ate the elementary school at L. G. Hanscom Field, Bed- 
ford, Massachusetts, or take any other action rela- 
tive thereto. 
(By consent calendar) 

That the Town authorizes the Board of Selectmen and 
the School Committee to continue the Town's annual 
contract with the Secretary of Defense to operate the 
elementary school at L. G. Hanscom Field, Bedford, 
Massachusetts. 



ARTICLE 8. 



VOTED: 



To see if the Town will vote to support the School 
Committee in its continuing plan to bring a limited 
number of children from Boston to the Lincoln Schools 
for purposes of education, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 
(Unanimously) 

That the Town authorizes the School Committee to con- 
tinue the plan to bring a limited number of children 
from Boston to the Lincoln Schools for purposes of 
education. 



ARTICLE 9. 



VOTED: 



To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money by taxation, by transfer from availa- 
ble funds, or any combination thereof, for use by the 
Planning Board in planning and preparation for a town- 
wide conference on land use issues before the Town, 
said conference to be held before the next Annual 
Town Meeting, such issues to include Town policy on 
the ultimate location of Route 2, traffic and other 
land use issues relating especially to Hanscom Air 
Force Base, MassPort and related community development, 
Town policy on moderate income housing and housing for 
the elderly, and the Town's open space and conservation 
policies, or take any other action relative thereto. 
(Unanimously) 

That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of $5,000 
by taxation, for use by the Planning Board in planning 
and preparation for a Town-wide conference on land use 
issues before the Town, said conference to be held be- 
fore the next Annual Town Meeting, such issues to in- 
clude Town policy on the ultimate location of Route 2, 
traffic and other land use issues relating especially 
to Hanscom Air Force Base, MassPort and related com- 
munity development, Town policy on moderate income 
housing and housing for the elderly, and the Town's 
o^en space and conservation policies. 



23 



ARTICLE 10, 



To see if the Town will vote to impose a temporary 
moratorium on further residential development in that 
area of the Town north and immediately south of the 
Cambridge Turnpike (Route 2) by amending both the 
Zoning By-Law and the Zoning Map to establish until 
the final adjournment of the 1984 Annual Town Meeting 
a new overlay zoning district, entitled "North Lincoln 
Planning District" (the District), which will include 
all land in the Town located north of the Cambridge 
Turnpike (Route 2) and all land within one hundred 
(100) feet of the southerly boundary of said Turnpike 
and in which District all provisions of the Zoning 
By-Law applicable to the land in the underlying Dis- 
trict shall apply with the following two exceptions: 

(1) After the date of the first publication of 
notice by the Planning Board of the public 
hearing with respect to this amendment, no 
building permit shall be issued to build a new 
single family residence on any lot within the 
District which did not exist as a separate lot 
on the date of the first publication of said 
notice; 



VOTED : 



(2) The minimum area for any lot within the Dis- 
trict which is also within the underlying R-l 
Single Family Residence District shall be 
200,000 square feet and the minimum street 
frontage of any such lot shall be 250 feet, 
provided, however, that those area and street 
frontage requirements shall not apply to lots 
legally established before the date of the first 
publication of notice by the Planning Board of 
a public hearing with respect to this amendment 
and shall not apply to lots appearing on plans 
for the division of land into two or more separ- 
ate lots, which plans were submitted to the 
Planning Board pursuant to the provisions of 
Chapter 41 of the General Laws prior to the 
date of the first publication of said notice; 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

(By a count of 210 in favor, with 7 opposed) 
That the Town votes to impose a temporary moratorium 
on further residential development in that area of the 
Town north and immediately south of the Cambridge Turn- 



24 



pike (Route 2) 

1) By amending the Zoning By-Laws as follows: 

a) By adding to Section 3.2 a new Overlay 
District entitled M NL North Lincoln Plan- 
ning District (Section 12.5)"; 

b) By striking out the first sentence of 
Section 12 and substituting therefor the 
following: 

"The C-Open Space Conservation District, 
the W-Wetlands and Watershed Protection 
District, the FP-Flood Plain District, the 
H-Historic District and the NL-North Lin- 
coln Planning District are hereby estab- 
lished as overlay districts and shall be 
superimposed on other districts estab- 
lished by this By-Law"; and 

c) By adding to Section 12 the following new 
section: 

"12.5 NL-North Lincoln Planning District . 

The North Lincoln Planning District (the 
district) is established as an overlay dis- 
trict but only until final adjournment of 
the 1984 Annual Town Meeting in order to 
impose a temporary moratorium on further 
residential development within the District 
to continue present studies and permit 
further studies of land use, traffic pat- 
terns, water and natural resources and the 
provision of public services. All pro- 
visions of the Zoning By-Law applicable to 
the land in the underlying district shall 
apply with the following two exceptions: 

(i) After the date of the first publica- 
tion of notice by the Planning Board 
of the public hearing with respect 
to this amendment, namely, February 
24, 1983, no building permit shall 
be issued to build a new single fam- 
ily residence on any lot within the 
District which did not exist as a 
separate lot on the date of the first 

25 



publication of said notice; 

(ii) The minimum area for any lot within 
the District which is also within 
the underlying R-l Single Family 
Residence District shall be 200,000 
square feet and the minimum street 
frontage of any such lot shall be 
250 feet, provided, however, that 
those area and street frontage re- 
quirements shall not apply to lots 
legally established before the date 
of the first publication of notice 
by the Planning Board of a public 
hearing with respect to this amend- 
ment, namely February 24, 1983, and 
shall not apply to lots appearing 
on plans for the division of land 
into two or more separate lots, 
which plans were submitted to the 
Planning Board pursuant to the pro- 
visions of Chapter 41 of the General 
Laws prior to the date of the first 
publication of said notice. 

2) By amending the Zoning Map of the Town by add- 
ing a new overlay district entitled "NL-North 
Lincoln Planning District" which shall include 
all land in the Town located north of the Cam- 
bridge Turnpike (Route 2) and all land within 
one hundred (100) feet of the southerly boundary 
of said Turnpike. The NL-North Lincoln Planning 
District shall be eliminated from the Zoning 
Map of the Town upon final adjournment of the 
1984 Annual Town Meeting. 

ARTICLE 11 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Map 
of the Town as follows: 

1) v That the following properties in the Town of 

Lincoln be rezoned from their current status of 
R-l (Single-Family Residence District) to the 
status of R-3 (Open Space Residential Develop- 
ment District) , and that the "Zoning Map" 
dated March 25, 1978 incorporated into the 
Town of Lincoln Zoning By-Law, Section 2 there- 
of, be amended accordingly: 

26 



Two parcels comprising 105.78 acres of land 
Southerly of Route 2A (North Great Road) and 
Easterly of Bedford Road in Lincoln, Middlesex 
County, Massachusetts, shown on a Preliminary 
Subdivision Plan entitled "Topographic Plan of 
Ricci Farm in Lincoln, Mass.", prepared by 
Allen $ Demur jian, Inc., dated December 14, 
1982, and filed with the Planning Board of the 
Town of Lincoln, bounded: 



NORTHERLY: By land of the United States of 
America § Route 2A; 

EASTERLY: By land of the Town of Lincoln 

and land of Domenic Domenichella, 
Frank A. Domenichella, Jr., Lou- 
ise Damico and Joseph Cotoni; 

SOUTHEASTERLY: By land of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, D'Arrigo Brothers 
Company of Massachusetts and 
Edward and Stephanie Danofsky; 

SOUTHWESTERLY: By land of Rudolph § Irene E. 
Litte, the Estate of M. Frances 
Vitale, John P. and Mary Ellen H. 
Russell, and James 0. Selland; 



WESTERLY: 



By land of Robert H. and Mary F, 
Chipman, John and Geneva Ann 
DeJesus, Talbot D. and Emily D. 
Lover ing, the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts and Bedford Road. 



VOTED: 



ARTICLE 12. 



To pass over the article. 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money to acquire by purchase, gift, eminent 
domain or in any other way for highway purposes or 
other municipal purposes the following described par- 
cels of land now or formerly owned by Louis, Fred and 
Charles Ricci and James M. and Mary C. Giurleo, situa- 
ted off Bedford Road and North Great Road (Route 2A) 
adjacent to Minuteman National Park, and to determine 
whether the Town will provide such sums by taxation, 
borrowing, or by transfer of other available funds, or 
any combination of those methods. 

27 



VOTED: 



To pass over the article. 



ARTICLE 13, 



VOTED : 



ARTICLE 14, 



VOTED: 



To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, or any combination thereof, said sum to be used 
to design an entrance for the handicapped to the Town 
Hall, or take any other action relative thereto. 
(Unanimously) 

That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of $1500 
to be used to design an entrance for the handicapped 
to the Town Hall, said sum to be raised by taxation. 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money by borrowing, by transfer from available 
funds, or any combination thereof, said sum to be used 
for the construction, reconstruction, and/or mainten- 
ance and repair of roads and bridges and the enforce- 
ment of traffic laws, and that the Treasurer be auth- 
orized to borrow in anticipation of reimbursement by 
the Commonwealth under Chapter 283, Acts of 1976, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 
(Unanimously) 

That the sum of $75,000 be appropriated for the con- 
struction, reconstruction, and/or maintenance and re- 
pair of roads and bridges and the enforcement of traf- 
fic laws, as requested by the Board of Selectmen, and 
that the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, 
is authorized to borrow said sum under Section 6a of 
Chapter 44 in anticipation of reimbursement from the 
Commonwealth. 



ARTICLE 15 



VOTED: 



To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, or any combination thereof, said sum to be used 
for the purchase of a 1/2 ton four-wheel drive pickup 
truck for the use of the Department of Public Works, 
and to see if the Town will authorize the disposal by 
sale or otherwise of excess vehicles and equipment, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 
(Unanimously) 

That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of $15,000 
to purchase a 3/4 ton four-wheel drive pickup truck 
for the use of the Department of Public Works, said 
sum to be taken from free cash, and authorize the dis- 
posal by sale of a 1967 Ford Carryall. 






28 



ARTICLE 16, 



VOTED: 



ARTICLE 17 



VOTED: 



ARTICLE 18 



VOTED: 



To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money by taxation, by transfer from availa- 
ble funds, or any combination thereof, said sum to be 
used for the purchase of an aerial bucket truck for 
the use of the Department of Public Works, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 
To pass over the article. 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money to be used for specialized maintenance 
and improvements in the Lincoln Cemetery, said sum to 
be taken from accumulated funds from the sale of 
cemetery lots, and held in a fund known as the Ceme- 
tery Improvement Fund, or take any other action rela- 
tive thereto. 
(Unanimously) 

That the Town appropriate the sum of $15,000 to be 
used for resurfacing roads, completing surveys, set- 
ting lot markers and other specialized maintenance 
and improvements in the Lincoln cemeteries, said sum 
to be taken from the Cemetery Improvement Fund. 

To see if the Town will vote to approve or disapprove 
the amount of additional indebtedness of $300,000 
authorized by vote of the Lincoln- Sudbury Regional 
District School Committee on March 8, 1983, for the 
purpose of repairing several remaining sections of 
the Regional School Building roof, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 
(By majority vote) 

That the Town approve the amount of additional in- 
debtedness of $300,000, authorized by vote of the 
Lincoln-Sudbury Regional District School Committee 
on March 8, 1983, for the purpose of repairing several 
remaining sections of the Regional School building 
roof. 



ARTICLE 19, 



VOTED: 



To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money by taxation, by transfer from availa- 
ble funds, or any combination thereof, said sum to be 
used for the repair and maintenance of certain Town 
buildings, or take any other action relative thereto. 
(Unanimously) 

That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of 
$15,000 to be used for the repair and maintenance of 
certain Town buildings, said sum to be raised by taxa- 
tion. 



29 



ARTICLE 20, 



VOTED: 



To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money by taxation, by transfer from availa- 
ble funds, or any combination thereof, to be expended 
under the direction of the Board of Selectmen and the 
Water Commissioners, said sum to be used for the pur- 
chase and installation of cables to be used for fire 
alarm signals and Water Department telemetry, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 
(Unanimously) 

That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of 
$10,000 to be expended under the direction of the 
Board of Selectmen and the Water Commissioners for 
the purchase and installation of cables to be used 
for fire alarm signals and Water Department telemetry, 
of which sum $6,667.00 is to be raised by taxation 
and $3,333.00 is to be appropriated from Water Depart- 
ment receipts. 



ARTICLE 21 



VOTED: 



To see if the Town will appropriate a portion of all 
of the unexpended balance of the proceeds of a loan 
of $80,000, which was borrowed, pursuant to a vote 
under Article 7 of the Warrant for the Special Town 
Meeting held on November 5, 1979, to install new 
chemical equipment at various Water Department loca- 
tions and to construct an addition to the Tower Road 
well house, all under the authority of General Laws, 
Chapter 44, Section 8 (7), to purchase additional 
Water Department equipment, money for which may be 
borrowed under the provisions of General Laws, Chap- 
ter 44, Section 8 (7c), or take any other action rela- 
tive thereto. 
(Unanimously) 

That the Town appropriate the sum of $42,243.29 from 
the unexpended balance of the proceeds of a loan of 
$80,000, which was borrowed, pursuant to a vote under 
Article 7 of the Warrant for the Special Town Meeting 
held on November 5, 1979, to install new chemical 
equipment at various Water Department locations, and 
to construct an addition to the Tower Road well house, 
all under the authority of General Laws, Chapter 44, 
Section 8 (7), to purchase Water Department equipment, 
money for which may be borrowed under the provisions 
of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 8 (7c). 



ARTICLE 22. 



To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, or any combination thereof, said sum to be used 



30 



VOTED: 



ARTICLE 23. 



VOTED: 



ARTICLE 24. 



VOTED : 



for the purchase of a 1/2 ton four-wheel drive pickup 
truck for the use of the Water Department, and to 
see if the Town will authorize the disposal by sale 
or otherwise of excess vehicles and equipment, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 
To pass over the article. 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
$2,500, or any other sum, by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, or any combination thereof, 
said sum to be used under the direction of the Hanscom 
Area Traffic Study Committee for the purpose of study- 
ing and planning road improvements and access roads 
in that area of Town abutting MassPort, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 
(Unanimously) 

That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of $2,500 
to be used under the direction of the Hanscom Area 
Traffic Study Committee for the purpose of studying 
and planning road improvements and access roads in the 
area of Town abutting MassPort, said sum to be raised 
by taxation. 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
$1,500, or any other sum, by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, or any combination thereof, 
said sum to be used under the direction of the Winter 
Street ad-hoc committee to study the rights of the 
Town to object to and take action, including legal 
action, to mitigate the environmental impact on the 
Town, particularly increased traffic problems, caused 
by proposed commercial developments near the Town line 
on Winter Street in Waltham, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 
(Unanimously) 

That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of $1,500 
to be used under the direction of the Winter Street 
ad-hoc committee to study the rights of the Town to 
object to and take action, including legal action, to 
mitigate the environmental impact on the Town caused 
by proposed commercial developments near the Town line 
on Winter Street in Waltham, said sum to be raised by 
taxation. 



ARTICLE 25 



To see if the Town will vote to discontinue a section 
of Winter Street in the area of the Lincoln/Waltham 
town line, and to authorize the Selectmen to take all 



31 



VOTED: 



action and execute on behalf of the Town all docu- 
ments to effect such discontinuance, including, if 
necessary, an application and petition to the County 
Commissioners, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

(By majority vote) 

That the Town vote to authorize the Selectmen to dis- 
continue a section of Winter Street in the area of 
the Lincoln/Waltham town line, and to take all action 
and execute on behalf of the Town all documents to 
effect such discontinuance, if, after study of traffic 
problems, the Selectmen deem such discontinuance ap- 
propriate. 



ARTICLE 26. 



VOTED: 



To see if the Town will vote to amend its General 

By-Laws by adding the following as Section 14 of 

Article XI: 

"Upon the expiration of the Tree Warden's term of 
office in 1984, that office shall thereafter be 
filled by appointment by the Selectmen, who shall 
annually appoint a Tree Warden for a term of one 
year," 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

(Unanimously) 

That the General By-Laws of the Town be amended by 

adding the following as Section 14 of Article XI: 
"Upon the expiration of the Tree Warden's term of 
office in 1984, that office shall thereafter be 
filled by appointment by the Selectmen, who shall 
annually appoint a Tree Warden for a term of one 



year 



M 



ARTICLE 27. 



VOTED: 



To see if the Town will vote to amend the General By- 
Laws of the Town of Lincoln to increase the Finance 
Committee from five to nine members by amending 
Article IV, Section 1, to replace the word "five" 
with the word "nine", and amending Article IV, Section 
2, by replacing "either one person or two persons, as 
may be necessary to provide a committee of five mem- 
bers" with "three persons to provide a committee of 
nine members"; such change to take effect following 
Annual Town Meeting in 1983, at which time three per- 
sons will be appointed for three years, two for two 
years, and one for one year, or take any action rela- 
tive thereto. 
(By majority vote) 
That Article IV - Finance Committee - of the General 



32 



By-Laws of the Town be amended as follows: 

"A. In Section 1, by striking out the word "five" 
and substituting therefor the word "seven", 
so that the Finance Committee shall be composed 
of seven registered voters of the Town. 



ARTICLE 28. 



VOTED: 



B. In Section 2, by striking out the first two 
sentences of that Section in their entirety 
and substituting therefor the following: 

"The Moderator of the Town shall within thirty 
days after the final adjournment of every Annual 
Town Meeting appoint for a term of three years 
either two persons or three persons, as may be 
necessary to provide a committee of seven mem- 
bers, except that following the final adjourn- 
ment of the Annual Town Meeting in 1983, the 
Moderator shall appoint four persons, two for 
terms of three years each and two for terms of 
two years each. The term of office of each 
member shall commence immediately upon quali- 
fication and shall expire upon the final ad- 
journment of the Annual Town Meeting of the last 
year of such person's term of office." 

To see if the Town will appoint a committee to in- 
vestigate placing underground all or some of the 
utility wires which are above ground on Lincoln Road, 
Sandy Pond Road, Weston Road, Bedford Road and Trapelo 
Road in the central part of Town, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 
A motion as follows: 

"That the Selectmen appoint a committee to investigate 
placing underground all or some of the utility wires 
which are above ground on Lincoln Road, Sandy Pond 
Road, Weston Road, Bedford Road and Trapelo Road, in 
the central part of Town" was amended by majority 
voice vote so that "all roads in Town" is substituted 
for "Lincoln Road, Sandy Pond Road, Weston Road, Bed- 
ford Road and Trapelo Road, in the central part of 
Town". The motion, as amended was adopted by a 
majority voice vote, and reads as follows: 
"That the Selectmen appoint a committee to investigate 
placing underground all or some of the utility wires 
which are above ground on all roads in Town." 



33 



ARTICLE 29 



VOTED: 



To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, or any combination thereof, said sum to be 
used to design the proposed Weston Road Bicycle Path, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 
(Unanimously) 

That the Town encourage the Selectmen, the Planning 
Board and the Bicycle Path Subcommittee of the Plan- 
ning Board to initiate the lay-out and design of a 
roadside path along Weston Road from Lincoln Road to 
the Weston line, utilizing the existing resources of 
such agencies. 



ARTICLE 30, 



VOTED: 



ARTICLE 31. 



VOTED : 



To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money to be added to the aggregate amounts 
appropriated under Article 32 of the Warrant for the 
Annual Town Meeting on March 25, 1978, under Article 
29 of the Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting on 
March 27, 1979, and under Article 12 of the Warrant 
for the Special Town Meeting on June 16, 1981, for 
the laying out and construction of a bicycle path on 
Concord Road (Route 126) from its intersection with 
South Great Road (Route 117) to Baker Bridge Road, or 
such shorter distance as the Planning Board may de- 
termine, said additional sum to be used for the con- 
struction of said path as shown on a plan for said 
path on file with the Town Clerk, all amounts appro- 
priated for this purpose to be subject to the condi- 
tions set forth in said Article 12, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 
To pass over the Article. 

To see if the Town of Lincoln will vote to amend 
Section 16.6 of the Zoning By-Law to permit the Plan- 
ning Board to grant a special permit allowing signs 
to be internally illuminated, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 
(Unanimously) 

That the Zoning By-Law be amended by striking out 
section 16.6 (e) in its entirety and substituting 
therefor the following: 
"16.6 (e) Except as authorized by Special Permit 

in accordance with Section 16.5, the light- 
ing for any signs shall be a white light 
and the lighting shall not be from within 
the sign. All lights illuminating any 
sign shall be of steady illumination and 



34 



shall be properly shielded to the satis- 
faction of the Planning Board." 

ARTICLE 32 . To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 18, 

General Regulations, of the Zoning By-Law, by adding 
the following sections, or take any other action rela- 
tive thereto: 

"18.4.1 No more than two unregistered motor vehi- 
cles shall be placed, stored, or kept on a 
lot used for residential purposes except 
as provided herein. No unregistered motor 
vehicles shall be stored or placed on a 
street or private way except as provided 
herein. All privately owned unregistered 
motor vehicles shall be stored, parked, or 
kept standing on any such lot in such a man- 
ner as to prevent all such unregistered 
motor vehicles from being viewed from any 
dwelling or street. 

18.4.2 Notwithstanding any other provision of the 
Zoning By-Law, the Planning Board may grant 
a special permit authorizing an applicant 
to place, store, or keep three or more such 
unregistered motor vehicles on said property, 
if the Planning Board determines in its sole 
judgment that such placement, storage, or 
keeping will not be detrimental to the pub- 
lic safety and welfare and will be in har- 
mony with the general purposes and intent 

of the Zoning By-Law. In granting any 
special permit hereunder, the Planning Board 
may impose such conditions, safeguards, lim- 
itations and restrictions, including a limi- 
tation on the duration of a special permit, 
which it deems appropriate and which are not 
inconsistent with any of the provisions of 
the Zoning By-Law. All such permits shall 
only be issued following a public hearing 
in accordance with Chapter 40A of the Gen- 
eral Laws. 

18.4.3 This By-Law does not apply to the following: 

(a) to unregistered motor vehicles en- 
closed in a building. 

35 



(b) to unregistered motor vehicles used 
for farm, garden or nursery purposes. 
VOTED : (By a count of 125 in favor, with 30 opposed)" 

That the Zoning By-Law be amended by adding the follow- 
ing sections to Section 18 - General Regulations - and 
Section 23 - Definitions - respectively: 
"18.4 Unregistered Motor Vehicles 

18.4.1 No more than two unregistered motor vehicles 
shall be placed, stored, or kept on a lot 
used for residential purposes except as pro- 
vided herein. No unregistered motor vehi- 
cles shall be stored or placed on a street 
or private way except as provided herein. 

(a) Motor vehicle parts must be stored in 
containers or structures in a visually 
acceptable manner that precludes the 
likelihood of accident, seepage, con- 
tamination or other conditions which 
may constitute a nuisance or create 
the likelihood of a nuisance. 

18.4.2 Notwithstanding any other provision of the 
Zoning By-Law, the Planning Board may grant 
a special permit authorizing an applicant 
to place, store, or keep three or more such 
unregistered motor vehicles on such a lot, 
if the Planning Board determines in its sole 
judgment that such placement, storage or 
keeping will not be detrimental to the public 
general purposes and intent of the Zoning By- 
Law. In granting any special permit here- 
under, the Planning Board may impose such 
conditions, safeguards, limitations and re- 
strictions, including a limitation on the 
duration of a special permit, which it deems 
appropriate and which are not inconsistent 
with any of the provisions of the Zoning By- 
Law. All such permits shall only be issued 
following a public hearing in accordance 
with Chapter 40A of the General Laws. 

18.4.3 This By-Law does not apply to the following: 

(a) to unregistered motor vehicles enclosed 
in a building. 



36 



(b) to unregistered motor vehicles used 

primarily for farm, garden or nursery- 
purposes." 



ARTICLE 33 



VOTED: 



ARTICLE 34 



VOTED: 



ARTICLE 35 



"23.21 Motor Vehicle : All vehicles constructed 

and designed for propulsion by power, other 
than muscular power, including such vehicles 
when pulled or towed by another motor vehi- 
cle, regardless of condition. In doubtful 
cases, the Planning Board may determine 
whether or not any particular vehicle is a 
motor vehicle as herein defined. 

23.22 Motor Vehicle Parts : Any equipment, acces- 
sory, used or new integral part generally 
recognized as belonging to or an attachment 
to a motor vehicle." 

To see if the Town will vote to rescind its authoriza- 
tion to borrow funds in the amount of $970,000 as voted 
in Article 5 of the November 5, 1979, Special Town 
Meeting (acquisition of Adams Woods), or take any other 
action relative thereto. 
(Unanimously) 

That the Town rescind its authorization to borrow funds 
in the amount of $970,000, as voted in Article 5 of the 
November 5, 1979, Special Town Meeting (acquisition of 
Adams Woods) . 

To see if the Town will vote to rescind its authoriza- 
tion to borrow the sum of $24,000 of the total author- 
ized borrowing of $86,000, which was voted under Arti- 
cle 12 of the Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting held 
on March 24, 1979 (acquisition of Umbrello land), in 
order to reflect the amount actually borrowed under 
that Article, or take any other action relative thereto. 
(Unanimously) 

That the Town rescind its authorization to borrow the 
sum of $24,000 of the total authorized borrowing of 
$86,000, which was voted under Article 12 of the Warrant 
for the Annual Town Meeting held on March 24, 1979 
(acquisition of the Umbrello land), in order to reflect 
the amount actually borrowed under that Article. 

To see if the Town will vote to instruct the Selectmen 
to actively carry out the Town mandate for a bilateral 
nuclear weapons freeze both through Town membership in 



37 



VOTED: 



the Coalition for a Nuclear Weapons Freeze and through 
other appropriate activities; and to see if the Town 
will vote to appropriate the sum of $500 for membership 
fees and other expenses thereof. 
(By majority voice vote) 

That the Town instruct the Selectmen to actively carry 
out the Town mandate for a bilateral nuclear weapons 
freeze both through Town membership in the Coalition 
for a Nuclear Weapons Freeze and through other appro- 
priate activities; and that the Town will raise and 
appropriate the sum of $500 for membership fees and 
other expenses thereof, said sum to be raised by taxa- 
tion. 



ARTICLE 36 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
by taxation, by transfer from available funds or any 
combination thereof, the sum of $6,000, or any other 
sum, said sum to be added to the amount appropriated 
under Article 5 of the Warrant for the Annual Town Meet- 
ing on March 27, 1982, for line item #956 (Interest on 
bonds and temporary notes) , or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

VOTED : (Unanimously) 

That the Town appropriate the sum of $6,000 from Water 
Department receipts to be added to the amount appro- 
priated under Article 5 of the Warrant for the Annual 
Town Meeting on March 27, 1982, for line item #956 
(interest on bonds and temporary notes) . 

There being no further business to come before the Meeting, it was 
moved, seconded and voted to adjourn until 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, March 
29, 1983, at which time the Meeting will reconvene if Question 1 on 
the ballot to be considered on Monday, March 28, 1983, is defeated. 
(Question 1 deals with an override of Proposition 2 1/2, and the bud- 
get adopted today under Article 5, is based on the premise that the 
override will be approved.) If Question 1 is adopted by the Town, 
this Town Meeting will be dissolved, and no session on March 29, 1983, 
will be necessary. The time of adjournment was 6:25 p.m. 

(At various stages of the Meeting, tribute was paid to several re- 
tiring officers, as follows: 

To Dante Germanotta, who is retiring from the Regional 
School Committee after several years of dedicated ser- 
vices to the Region; 



38 



To James Spindler, who is retiring from the Elementary- 
School Committee, and has made major contributions to 
the work of that Committee during his six-year tenure; 

To Henry Morgan, who is retiring from the Board of 
Selectmen after serving five years. His contributions 
to the Town during this period, as well as his service 
in several other capacities over a long period of time, 
have been extremely helpful and deserve particular 
recognition; 

To Guy Guarino, who is retiring from the Planning Board 
after five years of dedicated service; 

To Susan Fargo, who is retiring as editor of the Lin- 
coln Edition of the Concord Journal, and who has been 
responsible for greatly improving the coverage of Lin- 
coln news, both in quality and quantity. 

Each of the persons named above was tendered a rising vote of thanks 
by the voters of the Town present at this Town Meeting. In addition, 
Mr. Donaldson paid tribute to Elliott V. Grabill, the former treasurer 
and tax collector, who died in 1982, and who had made many contribu- 
tions to Town Government over the years. 

Elizabeth J. Snelling 
Town Clerk 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 
March 28, 1983 

In accordance with Article 1 of the Warrant for the Annual Town 
Meeting, the polls were declared open at 7:30 a.m. by Town Clerk 
Elizabeth Snelling. The following Wardens assisted Mrs. Snelling 
throughout the day: William G. Langton, John A. Ritsher, Fred J. 
Wilfert, Howard Snelling, Corinne MacLean, Alice E. Garrison, John B. 
Garrison and Eleanor Wilfert. The polls were declared closed at 
8 p.m. by Mrs. Snelling. There was a total vote of 615, with 209 in 
Precinct 1 and 406 in Precinct 2, with the following results: 

Office Candidate Precinct 1 Precinct 2 Total 

Town Clerk 

CI year) Elizabeth J. Snelling 179 353 532 

Blanks _J50 J53 _83 

209 406 615 

39 



Office 


Candidate 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Total 


Board of 










Selectmen 










(5 years) 


John R. Caswell 


185 


545 


528 




Blanks 


26 


61 


87 






209 


406 


615 


Board of 










Selectmen 










CI year) 


Ann E. Sutherland 


167 


545 


510 




Blanks 


42 


65 


105 






209 


406 


615 


Town 










Treasurer 










CI year) 


Roy M. Raja 


175 


544 


517 




Blanks 


56 


62 


98 






209 


406 


615 


Board of 










Assessors 










C5 years) 


John R. Snelling 


- 


4 


4 




Carol Caswell 


- 


1 


1 




Blanks 


209 


401 


610 






209 


406 


615 


Collector 










of Taxes 










C5 years) 


Roy M. Raja 


174 


545 


517 




Blanks 


55 


65 


98 






209 


406 


615 


School 










Committee (2) 










(5 years) 


Wilson C. Hayes 


151 


249 


580 




Joan McK. Walker 


155 


500 


455 




Blanks 


152 


265 


595 






418 


812 


1250 


Water 










Commissioner 










C5 years) 


Robert L. DeNormandie 


150 


229 


559 




Paul Svetz 


67 


156 


225 




Blanks 


12 
209 


21 
406 


55 
615 



40 






Office 



Candidate 



Precinct 1 Precinct 2 Total 



Board of 










Health 










(3 years) 


John M. O'Loughlin, M.D. 


171 


329 


500 




Blanks 


38 


77 


115 






209 


406 


615 


Cemetery 










Commissioner 










(3 years) 


James DeNormandie 


173 


321 


494 




Blanks 


36 


85 


121 






209 


406 


615 


Planning 










Board 










(5 years) 


F. Douglas Adams 


91 


193 


284 




John D. Lee 


96 


180 


276 




Blanks 


22 


33 


55 



209 



406 



615 



Commissioner 
of Trust Funds 

(3 years) Virginia M. Niles 
Blanks 



176 

33 

209 



342 

64 

406 



518 

97 

615 



Trustee of 
Bemis Fund 
(3 years) 



Amalie M. Kass 
Blanks 



163 

46 

209 



307 

99 

406 



470 
145 
615 



Trustee of 

Lincoln 

Library 



(3 years) 


Eleanor H. Fitzgerald 


172 


329 


501 




Blanks 


37 


77 


114 






209 


406 


615 


Trustee, 










DeCordova 










Museum 










(4 years) 


Lynn A. Gargill 


173 


336 


509 




Blanks 


36 


70 


106 



209 



406 



615 



41 



Office 


Candidate 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Total 


Housing 










Commission 










(2 years) 


Mary Helen Lorenz 


157 


287 


444 




Blanks 


52 


119 


171 






209 


406 


615 


Housing 










Commission 


(2) 








(3 years) 


Katherine S. McHugh 


130 


252 


382 




William B. Russell 


146 


272 


418 




L. Bruce Long, Jr. 


73 


146 


219 




Blanks 


69 


142 


211 






418 


812 


1230 


Recreation 










Committee 










(3 years) 


Kenneth Laurence 


159 


318 


477 




Blanks 


50 


88 


138 






209 


406 


615 


Tree 










Warden 










(1 year) 


Ronald F. Wood 


180 


326 


506 




Blanks 


29 


80 


109 



209 



406 



615 



Lincoln-Sudbury 

Regional High 

School (2) Richard F. Brooks 

William A. King 

Blanks 



144 


277 


421 


178 


345 


523 


96 


190 


286 



418 



812 



1230 



Lincoln-Sudbury 
Regional High 
School 

(1 year) Raymond P. Clark 
Blanks 



159 

50 

209 



284 
122 
406 



443 
172 
615 



Question 1: 



Shall the Town of Lincoln 
be allowed to assess an 
additional $105,637 in real 
estate and personal property 
taxes^ for the fiscal year 



42 



Office 


Candidate 




Precinct 


1 Precinct 2 


Total 




beginning July 


first, 










nineteen hundred and 










eighty-three? 












Yes 




134 


294 


428 




No 




66 


102 


168 




Blanks 




9 


10 


19 








209 


406 


615 


Question 2: 


Shall the Town 


of Lincoln 









be allowed to exempt the 
amounts required to pay for 
the bond issued in order 
to acquire for highway pur- 
poses or other municipal 
purposes certain parcels of 
land now or formerly owned 
by Louis, Fred and Charles 
Ricci and James M. and Mary 
C. Giurleo, situated off 
Bedford Road and North Great 
Road (Route 2A) adjacent to 
the Minuteman National Park? 

Yes 

No 

Blanks 



106 


234 


340 


54 


92 


146 


49 


80 


129 


209 


406 


615 


izabeth J. 


Snelling 




Town Clerk 





43 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
November 15, 1983 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the meeting was called to 
order by the Moderator, Mr. David M. Donaldson, at 7:30 p.m., and a 
quorum being present, the following business was transacted: 



ARTICLE 1 



VOTED: 



ARTICLE 2 



VOTED : 



To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of 
money as the Town f s share of funds to be expended 
under the direction of the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional 
School District Committee to repair the drainage 
around the bleachers on the west side of the Lincoln- 
Sudbury Regional High School football field, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 
(Unanimously) 

That the Town appropriate the sum of $901.10 from 
free cash, as the Town's share of funds to be expended 
under the direction of the Lincoln- Sudbury Regional 
High School District Committee, to repair the drainage 
around the bleachers on the west side of the Lincoln- 
Sudbury Regional High School football field. 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money, by borrowing, by transfer from availa- 
ble funds, by gift, or any combination thereof, for 
the repair and renovation of the Codman Farmhouse, 
presently owned by the Town, in order to create a 
small shared living facility for the elderly and liv- 
ing quarters for the caretaker of the Codman Barn Com- 
plex, or take any other action relative thereto. 
(By a count of 200 in favor, with 33 opposed) 
That the Town appropriate the sum of $150,000 for the 
repair and maintenance of the Codman Farmhouse, owned 
by the Town, in order to create a small shared living 
facility for the elderly and living quarters for the 
caretaker for the Codman Barns Complex; and that to 
meet said appropriation $50,000 is appropriated from 
sums to be received from the Codman Trustees, and the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, is 
authorized to borrow $100,000 under the provisions of 
Chapter 359 of the Acts of 1979, and to issue bonds or 
notes of the Town therefor, payable in accordance with 
said Chapter 359; and that the Housing Commission is 
hereby authorized to apply any gifts which may be re- 
ceived after the permanent bonding has taken place 
towards the payment of interest and principal for said 
bonding. 

44 



ARTICLE 3, 



VOTED: 



To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 14.3 (a) 
of the Zoning By-Law pertaining to accessory apart- 
ments to exempt buildings owned by the Town of Lin- 
coln from the owner-occupancy requirement set forth 
in said section, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 
(Unanimously) 

That Section 14.3.2 (a) of the Lincoln Zoning By-Laws 
be amended by adding the following sentence to the 
end of said section: "If the lot on which the apart- 
ment is to be located is owned by the Town of Lincoln, 
the owner-occupancy requirement of this paragraph 
shall not be applicable as long as the lot and the 
structures thereon continue to be owned by the Town 
of Lincoln. 



ARTICLE 4, 



VOTED: 



To see if the Town will vote, subject to and condi- 
tional upon a favorable vote of the Town to exempt 
the amounts required to pay principal of and interest 
on any borrowing authorized by a vote under this 
Article from the limitation on total taxes imposed by 
General Laws, Chapter 59, Section 21C (Proposition 
2 1/2), to acquire by purchase, eminent domain or 
otherwise, for conservation purposes, five parcels 
of land owned by the Sandy Pond Trust, hereinafter 
described, containing approximately 167 acres, and 
for that purpose to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing, or by any combination of those methods; 
to apply to the U. S. and to the Commonwealth or either 
of them for grants or reimbursements for such acquisi- 
tion, and to appropriate any such grant or reimburse- 
ment toward payment of the costs and expenses of such 
acquisition; or take any other action relative thereto. 
(By a count of 310 in favor, with 10 opposed) 
That the Selectmen are authorized in the name and on 
behalf of the Town, subject to and conditional upon a 
favorable vote of the Town to exempt the amounts re- 
quired to pay principal of and interest on any borrow- 
ing authorized by this vote from the limitation on to- 
tal taxes imposed by General Laws, Chapter 59, Section 
21C (Proposition 2 1/2), to acquire by purchase, emi- 
nent domain or otherwise, for conservation purposes, 
under Section 8C of Chapter 40 of the General Laws, as 
amended, five parcels of land owned by the Sandy Pond 
Trust, comprising 168 acres, more or less, four of 
which parcels are described as parcels 1, 9, 11 and 12 



45 



in a deed from Sumner Smith to the Trustees of the 
Sandy Pond Trust, dated August 31, 1961, recorded 
with South Middlesex Deeds in Book 9881, Page 569 
(but excluding from said parcel 12 the portion there- 
of conveyed by Sandy Pond Trust to the Executors of 
the Will of Alice G. Meriam by deed dated September 
16, 1983, and including the adjacent land conveyed 
to Sandy Pond Trust by such Executors by deed re- 
corded therewith) , and the fifth of which parcels is 
the land shown as Lots 28-1.01 and 28-1.02 on Land 
Court Plans No. 29457 and 13936; that the sum of 
$1,500,000 be hereby raised and appropriated for this 
purpose; that the Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Selectmen, is authorized to borrow $1,500,000 under 
Section 7 (3) of Chapter 44 of the General Laws, as 
amended, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town 
therefor, payable in accordance with said Chapter; 
that the Selectmen are authorized to apply to the 
appropriate agencies of the Federal Government and 
the Commonwealth, or either of them, for grants for 
such acquisition, and to accept gifts toward such 
acquisition, and to apply such grants and/or gifts, 
and interest thereon, to the expenses of such acquisi- 
tion and of such bond or note issue, and to interest 
and/or principal on such bonds or notes; that any re- 
imbursement under Section 11 of Chapter 132A of the 
General Laws shall be applied as provided therein and 
is hereby appropriated for that purpose; and that the 
Selectmen are authorized to execute and deliver in the 
name and on behalf of the Town such documents and 
agreements, and to take all other action as may be 
necessary or desirable to carry out the provisions of 
this vote. 

ARTICLE 5 . To see if the Town will vote, subject to and condi- 
tional upon a favorable vote of the Town to exempt the 
amounts required to pay principal of and interest on 
any borrowing authorized by a vote under this Article 
from the limitation on total taxes imposed by General 
Laws, Chapter 59, Section 21C (Proposition 2 1/2), to 
acquire by purchase, eminent domain or otherwise, for 
conservation purposes, a certain parcel of land owned 
by the Sandy Pond Trust, hereinafter described > con- 
taining approximately 38 acres, and for that purpose 
to "raise and appropriate a sum of money by taxation, 
by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or by 
any combination of those methods; to apply to the U.S. 

46 



and to the Commonwealth or either of them for grants 
or reimbursements for such acquisition and to appro- 
priate any such grant or reimbursement toward payment 
of the costs and expenses of such acquisitions; or 
take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : An amendment to the motion under Article 5, as fol- 
lows: 

"To amend the motion by inserting the following after 
the word "amended" which appears as the first word of 
the seventh line of the written motion appearing on 
the blue handout: "with the exception of a 50-foot 
wide easement through the property, which easement 
may be acquired for municipal purposes." was adopted 
by a majority voice vote. 

A second amendment substituting the figures "$375,000" 
for the figures "$500,000" was also adopted by major- 
ity voice vote. 

The main motion, as amended, was defeated by a major- 
ity vote. (This motion read as follows: 
"That the Selectmen are authorized in the name and on 
behalf of the Town, subject to and conditional upon 
a favorable vote of the Town to exempt the amounts 
required to pay principal of and interest on any bor- 
rowing authorized by this vote from the limitation on 
total taxes imposed by General Laws, Chapter 59, 
Section 21C (Proposition 2 1/2), to acquire by pur- 
chase, eminent domain, or otherwise, for conservation 
purposes under Section 8C of Chapter 40 of the General 
Laws, as amended, with the exception of a 50-foot wide 
easement through the property which easement may be 
acquired for municipal purposes, five parcels of land 
owned by the Sandy Pond Trust, comprising 38 acres, 
more or less, described as Parcel 4 in a deed from 
Sumner Smith to the Trustees of the Sandy Pond Trust 
dated August 31, 1961, recorded with South Middlesex 
Deeds in Book 9881, Page 569; that the sum of $375,000 
be hereby raised and appropriated for this purpose; 
that the Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen 
is authorized to borrow $375,000 under Section 7 (3) 
of Chapter 44 of the General Laws, as amended, and to 
issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor, payable in 
accordance with said Chapter; that the Selectmen are 
authorized to apply to the appropriate agencies of the 
Federal Government and the Commonwealth, or either of 
them, for grants for such acquisition, and to accept 

47 



. 



gifts toward such acquisition, and to apply such 
grants and/or gifts, and interest thereon, to the 
expenses of such acquisition and of such bond or 
note issue, and to interest and/or principal on such 
bonds or notes; that any reimbursement under Section 
11 of Chapter 13 2A of the General Laws shall be ap- 
plied as provided therein and is hereby appropriated 
for that purpose; and that the Selectmen are author- 
ized to execute and deliver in the name and on behalf 
of the Town such documents and agreements, and to 
take all other action, as may be necessary or desira- 
ble to carry out the provisions of this vote." 



ARTICLE 6, 



VOTED 



To see if the Town will vote to appropriate, by bor- 
rowing, by transfer from available funds, or any com- 
bination thereof, a sum of money, for the recon- 
struction of a portion of Bedford Road, as shown on 
a preliminary plan presently on file in the office of 
the Town Clerk, and that the Treasurer be authorized 
to borrow in anticipation of reimbursement by the 
Commonwealth under Chapter 283, Acts of 1976, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 
(By majority vote) 

That the Town appropriate the sum of $137,000 for the 
reconstruction of a portion of Bedford Road, as shown 
on a preliminary plan presently on file in the office 
of the Town Clerk, and that to meet said appropria- 
tion, $32,000 is to be taken from free cash, and that 
the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, is 
authorized to borrow the sum of $105,000, under 
Section 6A of Chapter 44, in anticipation of reim- 
bursement from the Commonwealth. 



ARTICLE 7 



VOTED : 



ARTICLE 8 



To see if the Town will vote to appropriate, by bor- 
rowing, by transfer from available funds, or any com- 
bination thereof, a sum of money for the placing un- 
derground of all utility wires on Bedford Road in the 
vicinity of Lincoln Center, to be completed in con- 
junction with the reconstruction of Bedford Road, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 
To pass over the article. 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
$10,000, or any other sum, by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, by borrowing, or any other com- 
bination thereof, said sum to be used by the Planning 
Board for planning and studies related to the Town- 
wide Land Use Conference and the development morator- 



48 



VOTED: 



ium imposed at the 1983 Annual Town Meeting, or take 

any other action relative thereto. 

(Unanimously) 

That the Town appropriate $6,000 from free cash to be 

used by the Planning Board for planning and studies 

related to the Town-wide Land Use Conference and the 

development moratorium imposed at the 1983 Annual Town 

Meeting. 



ARTICLE 9, 



VOTED: 



ARTICLE 10. 



VOTED: 



To see if the Town will vote to appropriate by trans- 
fer from Water Department Surplus a sum to be added 
to the amount appropriated under Article 5 of the War- 
rant for the Annual Town Meeting on March 26, 1983, 
for line item #952 (Expense), or take any other action 
relative thereto. 
(Unanimously) 

That the Town appropriate the sum of $13,000 to be 
added to the amount appropriated under Article 5 of the 
Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting on March 26, 1983, 
for line item #952 (Expense), said sum to be trans- 
ferred from Water Department Surplus. 

To see if the Town will vote to urge the United States 
government to delay for one year the deployment of new 
American missiles in Europe in order to give the nego- 
tiators more time to reach an agreement that would in- 
clude no new deployment of Euromissiles by either side 
and substantial Soviet reductions of already deployed 
missiles; and to communicate this vote to the Presi- 
dent, the Vice President, the Secretary of State, the 
U. S. negotiators, the U. S. Ambassador to the United 
Nations and the Town's representatives in Congress, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 
(Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to urge the United States govern- 
ment to delay for one year the deployment of new Amer- 
ican missiles in Europe in order to give the negotia- 
tors more time to reach an agreement that would include 
no new deployment of Euromissiles by either side and 
substantial Soviet reductions of already deployed mis- 
siles; and to communicate this vote to the President, 
the Vice President, the Secretary of State, the U. S. 
negotiators, the U. S. Ambassador to the United Na- 
tions and the Town's representatives in Congress. 



49 



ARTICLE 11 . To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of 
money for the repair of the cupola and roof at the 
Town Office Building, or take any other action rela- 
tive thereto. 

VOTED : (Unanimously) 

That the Town appropriate the sum of $15,000 from the 
Overlay Reserve to be added to the amount appropriated 
under Article 19 of the Annual Town Meeting of March 
26, 1983, for the purpose of completing unforeseen 
emergency repairs to the cupola and roof of the Town 
Offices Building. 

There being no further business to come before the Meeting, it was 
moved, seconded and unanimously voted to adjourn at 11:25 p.m. 

Elizabeth J. Snelling 
Town Clerk 



SPECIAL TOWN ELECTION 
November 29, 1983 

In accordance with a Warrant issued by the Selectmen, the polls were 
declared open at 8:00 a.m. by Town Clerk Elizabeth Snelling. The 
following Wardens assisted Mrs. Snelling throughout the day: John 
Ritsher, Fred Wilfert, Kerrie Luce, Alice E. Garrison, Beth Suther- 
land, Corinne MacLean, Arnold MacLean, John Caswell and Eleanor Wil- 
fert. The polls were declared closed at 8 p.m. by Mrs. Snelling. 
There was a total vote of 361, with 120 in Precinct #1, and 241 in 
Precinct #2, with the following results: 

Question Precinct 1 Precinct 2 Total 

#1. Shall the Town of Lincoln 
be allowed to exempt the 
amounts required to pay for 
the bond issued for the re- 
pairs and renovation of the 
Codman farmhouse, presently 
owned by the Town, in order 
to create a small shared 
living facility for the 
elder iy and living quarters 
for the caretaker of the 

50 



97 


204 


301 


21 


34 


55 


2 


3 


5 



Question Precinct 1 Precinct 2 Total 

Codman Barn 
Complex? 

Yes 

No 

Blanks 

120 241 361 

#2 Shall the Town of Lincoln 
be allowed to exempt the 
amounts required to pay 
for the bond issued in 
order to purchase, for 
conservation purposes, 
certain parcels of land 
owned by the Sandy Pond 
Trust? 

Yes 

No 

Blanks 



109 




212 


321 


11 




27 


38 







2 


2 


120 




241 


361 


Elizabeth J. 


Snell 


ing 




Town Clerk 







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53 



CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE FUNDS 
June 30, 1983 

Julia A Bemis $ 300.00 

William W. Benjamin 500.00 

Marie H. Bisbee 200.00 

Mildred E. Bowles 200.00 

Agnes L. Brown 300.00 

George Browning 200.00 

Sarah J. Browning 200.00 

Elizabeth G. Chapin 300.00 

Robert B. Chapin 300.00 

William N. Costello 100.00 

Mary H. Cushing 100.00 

Anthony J. Doherty 500.00 

Paul Dorian 150.00 

Charles P. Farnsworth 350.00 

Edward R. Farrar 300.00 

Francis Flint 250.00 

Orila J. Flint 300.00 

Donald Gordon 300.00 

Raymond E. Haggerty 150.00 

George Harrington lO^.OO 

Samuel Hartwell 300.00 

Thomas Huddleston 200.00 

Abijah G. Jones 300.00 

M. Gertrude Kelley 300.00 

John J. Kelliher 200.00 

Byron Lunt 300.00 

Gardner Moore 300.00 

Lena M. Newell 325.00 

Joa Pacewicz 400.00 

John H. Pierce 500.00 

Anne D. Pollard 300.00 

Charles 0. Preble 100.00 

Annie A. Ray 300.00 

Mary Susan Rice 87.27 

E. H. Rogers 250.00 
Mary James Scripture 500.00 
Eugene Sherman 200.00 
Charles S. Smith 300.00 
J. Waldo Smith 300.00 
Webster Smith 300.00 
Helen 0. Storrow 2,000.00 
George G. Tarbell 400.00 
Laura B. & Arthur E. Thiessen 500.00 
Maria L. Thompson 500.00 
Mabel H. Todd 200.00 
Ellen T. Trask 200.00 
Albert Washburn 500.00 
Elizabeth S. Wheeler 200.00 
Ellen F. Whitney 100.00 
Lewis W. Woodworth 150.00 
J. S. Wible 100.00 

F. B. Sargent 200.00 
Thomas Kershaw 1,000.00 

$16,912.27 

54 



CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE FUND 

Perpetual Care Funds at 7/1/82 $15,912.27 

Perpetual Care Fund income accumulated at 7/1/82 8,761.21 

Paid to Cemetery Perpetual Care Fund for 

maintenance of lots 1,000.00 

Income received 7/1/82-6/30/83 2,194.53 

Less payments, per Cemetery Commissioners 9,746.99 

Accumulated income at 6/30/83 2,208.7 5 

TOTAL $18,121.02 

CASH AND INVESTMENTS AT JUNE 30, 1983 

Middlesex Savings Bank, Income Account 1,208.75 

Middlesex Savings Bank, Perpetual Care Funds 

Investment Certificate to mature 2/13/85 15,912.27 

Savings Account 1,000.00 16,912.27 



TOTAL $18,121.02 



LINCOLN STABILIZATION FUND 
Cash Account 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1982 32.71 

Interest income 7/1/72 - 6/30/83 46.24 

78.95 

Bank interest allowed to accumulate 46.24 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1983 $ 32.71 

CASH AND INVESTMENTS AT JUNE 30, 1983 

BayBank Trust 32.71 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 476.62 

TOTAL $509.33 



55 



OUTSTANDING DEBT AT JUNE 30, 1983 

90,000 School Project Loan, 4.00%, due $45,000, each April 1, 1984-85, 
issued under Ch. 645, Acts of 1948. 

90,000 Total School Loans 



20,000 Swimming Pool Loan, 4.60%, due $10,000. each April 1, 1984-85, 
issued under Ch. 44, S. 7(2B) of the General Laws. 

7,500 Codman Kitchen Loan, 5.75%, due $2,500, each July 1, 1983-85, 
issued under Ch. 44, S. 7(3) of the General Laws. 

200,000 Conservation Land Loan, 4.65%, due $20,000, each April 1, 1984-93, 
issued under Ch. 44, S. 7(3) of the General Laws. 

50,000 Conservation Land Loan, 8.875%, due $10,000 each May 15, 1984-88, 
issued under Ch. 44, S. 7(3) of the General Laws. 

30,000 Codman Complex Loan, 5.50%, due $5,000 each Sept. 15, 1983-88. 

210,000 Energy Conservation Loan, 7.80%, due $25,000 each Dec. 1, 1983-88, 

and due $20,000 each Dec. 1, 1989-91, issued under Ch. 44, 
S. 7(36) of the General Laws. 

517,500 Total Municipal Loans 



607,500 NET DEBT 



5,000 Water Loan, 5.50%, due $5,000 June 15, 1984, issued under Ch. 44, 
S. 8(5). 

130,000 Water Loan, 5.20%, due $15,000, each August 1, 1983-90, issued 
under Ch. 44, S. 8(5). 

105,000 Water Loan, 4.65%, due $15,000, each April 1, 1983-90 issued 
under Ch. 44, S. 8(5). 

12,000 Water Loan, 5.25%, due $12,000, April 1, 1984, issued under 
Ch. 44, S. 8(7). 

2,000 Water Loan, 5.25%, due $2,000, April 1, 1984, issued under Ch. 
44, S. 8(5). 

1,055,000 Water Loan, 7.80%, due $105,000, each Dec. 1, 1983-85, $90,000 
due each Dec. 1, 1986-87, and $80,000 due each Dec. 1, 1988-94. 



1,309,000 TOTAL WATER LOANS 



1,916,500 TOTAL DEBT (bonded) 



56 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 
Betty L. Lang 



Current Taxes 
Personal 
Real Estate 



Prior Years' Taxes 
Personal 
Real Estate 



REVENUE 
July 1, 1982 - June 30, 1983 



$ 129,869.99 
4,068,342.35 



In Lieu of Taxes 

Massachusetts Port Authority 
Carroll School 
U.S. Dept. of Interior 
City of Cambridge 



Fines 

District Court 
Parking Clerk 
Library 



20.75 
102,489.02 



From State Local Aid Fund 

School Aid Chapter 70 257,443.00 
Lottery 50,243.00 
Local Aid Fund 170,488.00 
Loss of Taxes on Public Land 54,689.73 
Real Estate Abatements for Elderly 3,042.60 



33,500.00 
3,000.00 
5,133.00 
2,229.26 



18,925.00 
1,284.50 
3,669.22 



$ 4,198,212.34 



102,509.77 



535,906.33 



43,862.26 



23,878.72 



Licenses & Permits 
Licenses 
Permits 



Grants & Gifts - Federal 

Revenue Sharing, P.L. 92-512 

Air Force School 

USDA 

Title III ABE 

Title III In-Service Institute 

Chapter 2 ECIA 

Title IVC Project Art Band 

Title VIB Imp Diagnostic Approach 

Title VIC Special Education 



991.00 
44,796.50 



54,657.00 
2,346,105.37 

18,965.79 

31,503.00 
1,188.00 
4,320.00 

50,248.00 
1,957.00 

32,084.00 



45,787.50 



2,541,028.16 



57 



Grants from State 
School 

Transportation 
Building Assistance 
Met co 



80,195.00 

37,393.67 

223,228.00 



Other 

Highway Aid 52,831.00 

Library Aid 3,549.00 

Elder Affair Grant 3,521.00 

Chapter 90 Highway Reimbursement 34,991.21 



$ 340,816.67 



; 



94,892.21 



Grants from County 
Dog Fund 



717.52 



Gifts from Individuals & Others 
Codman Trustees 
Adams Woods 
Library Fund 
Emergency Assistance 
LCENA 
Dial Program 



32,255.02 
1,760.00 
4,810,76 
35.00 
1,353.50 
7,252.15 



47,466.43 



Motor Vehicle Excise 
1983 
1982 
Prior Years 



150,730.95 

59,543.17 

3,652.99 



213,927.11 



General Government 



Selectmen 


4,131.01 


Treasurer & Collector 


4,980.54 


Assessors 


309.58 


Town Clerk 


2,483.60 


Planning Board 


321.90 


Board of Appeals 


710.00 


Conservation 


242.82 


Codman Rental 


1,320.00 


Town Hall Rental 


737.50 


Center School Rental 


950.00 


Public Safety 




Accident Reports 


500.90 


Ambulance Fees 


9,361.96 


Alarm Assessments 


700.00 


Firearms I.D. 


46.00 


Restitution 


45.00 


Sale of Property 


250.00 


Fire Dept. Fees 


678.00 


Building Inspector 


85.00 


Sealer of Weights & Measures 


398.00 



16,186.95 



12,064.86 



58 



Health & Sanitation 
Garbage Collection 
Board of Health, Misc, 
Dog Clinic 
COA - Workman's Comp. 



Highway 

Veterans' Benefits 

School 
Tuitions 
Rentals 
Lunch Program 
AFSC 



Library 

Lost Books 



15,947.74 

3.03 

171.00 

1,194.93 



300.00 

24,826.66 

6,158.54 

39,519.35 



409.63 



$ 17,316.70 

783.33 

1,163.10 



70,804.55 



409.63 



Recreation 

Summer Day Camp 
Tennis Stickers 
Square Dance 



Youth Committee 

After School Sports 

Dances 

Movies 

Special Events 



Cemetery 

Sale of Lots 

Interments 

Foundations 



Unclassified 

Employee Insurance Reimbursements 
Air Force School 
Met co 



Interest 

On Deposits 
Taxes 

Motor Vehicle Excise 
Investments 
Revenue Sharing 
Cemetery Fund 
Trust Funds 



15,064.00 

1,387.10 

163.00 



3,510.00 

1,029.60 

535.00 

170.00 



19,362.50 

3,075.00 

220.00 



88,695.28 
1,585.85 



90,045.51 

22,031.07 

659.23 

25,069.57 

2,741.20 

993.92 

4,299.12 



16,614.10 



5,244.60 



22,657.50 



90,281.13 



145,839,62 



59 



Agency, Trust & Investments 
Dog Licenses due County 
Care & Custody of Dogs 
Fish & Game Licenses 
Deputy Collector 
Police Detail 
Conservation 
Swimming Pool 
Pierce House 
Day Camp Special Needs 
Campers' Insurance 
DPW Insurance Settlements 
Ambulance Billing 
School Custodian 
School Field Trips 
Guarantee Deposits 
Youth Committee Activity 
Codman Community Farm 
Parking Clerk 
Housing Commission Rentals 
Employee Deductions 
Tailings 
Trust Funds 
Surplus Cash Investment 



? 1,440.75 

356.00 

1,527.50 

1,962.20 

22,384.57 

18,271.67 

23,127.26 

28,735.37 

108.00 

348.00 

5,222.87 

930.00 

1,250.36 

5,338.27 

1,550.00 

1,920.00 

1,885.39 

355.00 

3,300.00 

1,541,438.57 

1,195.43 

125,322.64 

3,260,000.00 



$ 5,047,969.85 



Refunds 



5,403.72 



Municipal Indebtedness 
Serial Bond 
Temporary Loans 
Premium on Bonds 



210,000.00 

200,000.00 

168.70 



410,168.70 



Total General Receipts 



14,051,913.36 



Cash Balance, July 1, 1982 
General 
Federal Revenue Sharing 



352,758.61 
55,622.67 



408,381.28 



14,460,294.64 



60 



Water Receipts 
Water Rates 
Water Connections 
Hydrant Service 
Late Charges 
Shut-offs 

Insurance Settlement 
Misc. 

Serial Bond 
Temporary Loan 
Premium on Bonds 
Refund 



$ 197,867.77 

16,650.00 

20,000.00 

540.10 

560.00 

1,660.00 

365.00 

1,055,000.00 

1,200,000.00 

678.85 

28.72 



$ 2,493,350.44 



Water Cash Balance, July 1, 1982 



Total Revenue & Cash on Hand 



290,611.66 
2,783,962.10 

17,244*256.74 



61 



EXPENDITURES 

July 1, 1982 - June 30, 1983 

General Government 

Selectmen $ 1,561.15 

Finance Committee 77.58 

Town Office 298,878.30 

Town Office Bldg. 25,947.15 

Consulting & Engineering 11,373.23 

Legal 30,014.09 

Conservation 97,336.25 

Assessors 19,445.37 

Town Clerk 358.79 

Election & Registration 4,069.27 

Planning Board 4,617.47 

Board of Appeals 412.80 

Tree Warden 2,498.73 

Town Bldg. Consolidation,Art#21 (82-83) 39,549.76 

Town Hall Improvement, Art #11 (81-82) 1,940.06 
Planning Board Traffic Study Art#16 (80-81) 2,956.20 

Concord Rd. Bike Path Art#32 (78-79) 5,633.58 



Protection of Persons & Property 

Police Department 318,734.36 

Police Summer Patrols Art #4 (81-82) 4,372.02 

Fire Department 216,590.30 

Fire Alarm Cables Art#20 (83-84) 2,399.07 

Ambulance 6,950.00 

Communications 67,915.50 

Civil Defense 512.90 

Fire & Police Bldg. 13,361.83 

Building Inspections 33,344.80 

Town Building Repairs, Art#5 (81-82) 4,972.92 

Town Building Repairs, Art#26 (82-83) 7,747.99 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 1,315.00 



Health & Sanitation 

Board of Health 31,587.59 

Garbage Collection 15,840.00 

Animal Officer 16,556.80 

Council on Aging 12,110.83 

COA Dept. of Elder Affairs Grant 721.00 

Minuteman Home Care 198.00 

Emergency Assistance Fund 35.99 



Public Works 

Salaries & Expense 458,880.21 

Public Works Building 13,081.51 

SLF Cover Material, Art#22 (81-82) 2,076.00 

Construction & Maint. of Rds. ,Art#5 (78-79) 4,291.24 

Construction & Maint. of Rds. ,Art#2 (79-80) 18,290.23 

New Equipment, Art #25 (82-83) 35,000.00 



62 



546,669.78 



678,216.69 



77,050.21 



531,619.19 



Veterans' Services 62.00 

Education 

Elementary Schools 2,170,041.44 

Regional High School 607,822.60 

Regional H.S. Roof, Art#13 (81-82) 10,240.02 

Vo-Tech High School 36,884.00 

Air Force School 2,325,674.71 

Air Force School Cafeteria 56,217.58 

School Lunch Program 8,519.54 

Metco 122,272.11 

Chapter 2 ECIA 4,181.62 

Title III ABE 31,509.95 

Title IVB ESEA 946.90 

Title IVC Project Art Band 50,248.00 

Title III In-Service Institute 328.48 

Title VIB Special Ed Improvement 32,286.39 

Title VIB Improved Diagnostic Approach 1,914.30 

Dial Program, Other Grants 7,122.29 



Library- 
Salaries & Expense 179,868.42 
Building 17,596.46 



Recreation 

Salaries & Expense 27,938.58 
New Tennis Courts, Art#28 (78-79) 123.36 



Town Debt Service 

Serial Bonds 144,500.00 

Interest on Serial Bonds 25,930.00 

Temporary Loans 200,000.00 

Interest on Temporary Loans 4,974.78 

Payment in Antic, of Adams Woods Pledges 1,112.79 

Premium on Bond 168.70 



5,466,209.93 



197,464.88 



28,061.94 



Youth Committee 

Salaries & Expense 15,799.46 

Cemetery 

Interments 692.46 

Expense 11,774.59 

Cemetery Improvement s,Art#l 7 (83-84) 2,038.11 



14,505.16 



376,686.27 



63 



Unclassified 

Middlesex County Pension Fund 

Employee Hospital & Ins. Fund 

Property & Indemnity Insurance 

Town Report & Town Meeting Expense 

Celebration Committee 

Historical Commission 

Codman Complex Maintenance 

Housing Commission 

Energy Committee 

New Flagpole, Art#9 (82-83) 

LCENA, Art#29 (82-83) 

Codman Barn Repairs Art#10 (78-79) 

Energy Conservation #32 (82-83) 



156,316.00 

184,774.12 

64,881,71 

5,267.76 

2,034.45 

328.42 

407.42 

3,296.41 

163.70 

3,750.00 

250.00 

1,153.94 

190,154.25 



612,778.18 



Refunds 

Motor Vehicle Excise 
Real Estate 
Garbage 
Other 



3,861.99 

15,061.19 

120.00 

, 126.15 



19,169.33 



Agency, Trust & Investments 
Fish & Game Licenses 
Dog Licenses due County 
Police Detail 
Pierce House 
Deputy Collector 
Conservation 
Conservation Detail 
Swimming Pool 
Day Camp Special Needs 
Day Camp Insurance 
Codman Community Farm 
DPW Insurance Settlements 
Ambulance Billing 
Parking Clerk 
School Rentals 
School Custodian 
School Field Trips 
Library Special Fund 
Library Lost Books 
Youth Committee Activity 
Guarantee Deposits 
Codman Trustees 
Housing Commission Repairs 
Housing Commission Rentals 
Adams Woods Contributions 
North Lincoln Study Committee 
LCENA Contributions 
Donaldson Trust Fund 
Other Trust Funds 
Court Judgments 
Tailings 

Employee Deductions 
Surplus Cash Investment 



1,527.50 

1,605.25 

22,750.55 

29,055.80 

2,112.20 

258.32 

29.75 

20,778.37 

142.50 

360.00 

2,192.88 

5,368.26 

930.00 

150.28 

8,260.00 

1,250.36 

5,621.64 

2,925.60 

432.80 

1,830.00 

19,850.00 

1,750.00 

10,000.00 

1,597.63 

30.38 

231.47 

926.14 

4,785.83 

26,145.71 

4,000.00 

1,083.92 

1,536,604.37 

2,635,000.00 



4,349,587.51 



64 



State & County Assessments 

Audit Municipal Accounts 412.98 

State Recreation Area 49,554.38 

Motor Vehicle Excise 757.65 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 1,013.47 
Metropolitan Air Pollution Control District 1,290.66 

Mass Bay Transportation Authority 135,201.66 

County Tax 158,530.44 



Total Expenditures 

Cash Balance, June 30, 1983 
General 
Federal Revenue Sharing 



1,171,965.00 
51,020.87 



346,761.24 
13,260,641.77 



1,222,985,87 



14,483,627.64 



Water Department 
Salaries 
Wages 
Expense 
Bonds 

Interest on Bonds 
Water System Study, Art#l (80-81) 
Tower Rd. Well Site,Art#7 (79-80) 
Reservoir Construction Art#10 (81-82) 
Farrar Pond Well Art#20 (81-82) 
Chemical Equipment Art #21 (83-84) 
Water Insurance Settlements 
Refunds 

Temporary Loan 
Premium on Bond 



Water Cash Balance, June 30, 1983 



225.00 

64,130.83 

73,233.31 

49,000.00 

90,750.00 

192.08 

8,068.27 

156,708.60 

162,756.62 

2,165.92 

902.30 

473.30 

2,050,000.00 

678.85 



2,659,285.08 
101,344.02 



Total Expenditures & Cash on Hand 



2,760,629.10 
17,244,256.74 



REVENUE SHARING EXPENDITURES 
July 1, 1982 - June 30, 1983 



Revenue Sharing Funds 

Police Department, Salaries 



62,000.00 



Revenue Sharing reports and supporting documentation may be examined by 
the general public in the office of the Town Accountant, Town Office Bldg. 



65 



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70 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Joseph W. Howard 

Paul E. Marsh 

Douglas M. Burckett, Chairman 

Local Boards of Assessors continue to be more closely regulated and 
more intensely monitored by the state than any other agency of local govern- 
ment. All of the schedules, forms, procedures, and timetables which give 
Lincoln property taxpayers fits are products of the government of the Common- 
wealth — not of three fiends inventing red tape in the Town Offices. Listed 
at the end of this report are the six leading items of assessing practice — 
all matters of state law — which all taxpayers should be familiar with as well 
as a summary of property and a recapitulation of taxation for 1983 — all items 
defined by the state. 

What the Board does, in determining any one taxpayer's obligation, is to 
try to allocate as objectively as possible a proper proportion of this levy 
for each owner to pay — by using procedures mandated by the state the results 
of which are checked by the state. The Board is essentially a local agency 
of the Commonwealth. 

Items of assessing regulations you should be familiar with: 

1) The status of property on January 1 is the determinant of the tax 
in any year. 

2) All real estate and personal property tax abatement applications 
must be filed with the Board by October 1 of the year involved or 
30 days after the date of mailing of the tax bill. 

3) Motor vehicle and trailer excise tax abatement applications must 
be filed with the Board by December 31 of the year succeeding the 
year involved. If cars are changed during the year, it is the tax- 
payer's responsibility to file an abatement application. 

4) Chapter 59, Section 5, Clause 41 of the General Laws, as amended, 
provides for certain real estate tax exemptions for taxpayers who 
meet certain age, financial, etc., qualifications. Additional 
information may be obtained from the Assessors' Office. All ap- 
plications under Clause 41 must be filed with the Board by December 
15 of the year involved. 

5) Chapter 59, Section 5, Clause 41A provides for the deferral of 
real estate tax payments in certain instances. Additional infor- 
mation may be obtained from the Assessors' Office. All application 
under this clause must be filed by December 15 of the year involved. 

6) Veterans with 10% or more disability, holders of Purple Heart awards, 
and others, may qualify for a partial exemption. Additional infor- 
mation about these exemptions may be obtained from the Assessors' 
Office. 



71 



REAL ESTATE SUMMARY 



Property Description 

Residential-single 
dwelling unit 

Condominiums 

Residential - two or 
more dwelling units 

Part commercial/ 
part residential 

Commercial 

Land classified under 
Ch 61A 



Agricultural 


9 


Part residential/ 




part agricultural 


17 


Industrial 


— 


Vacant Land 


293 


Conservation Restriction 


79 



1,968 



11,200 
1,499,300 

9,440,600 
639,600 

270,311,800 





Assessed Valuation i 


Number of Parcels 


as of Jan. 1, 1983 


1,348 


$218,483,800 


188 


27,078,600 


8 


7,589,000 


8 


1,175,700 


18 


4,394,000 



72 



1983-84 Recapitulation 

Appropriations and Assessments: 

Appropriations to be raised by taxation $5,940,586.67 

Appropriations to be taken from available funds 419,237.04 

Final court judgments 4,000.00 
Overlay deficits of previous years 

Offsets to Cherry Sheet estimated receipts 305,236.00 

Snow and ice removal 1,738.53 

State and County assessments 336,006.00 

Overlay current fiscal year 207,591.35 

Gross Amount to be Raised $7,214,395.59 

Estimated Receipts and Available Funds : 

Estimated receipts from State $1,125,642.00 

Local estimated receipts 905,690.00 

Free cash to reduce tax rate 195,500.00 

Amounts to be taken from available funds 419,237.04 

Total estimated receipts and available funds $2,646,069.04 

Amount to be Raised by Taxation $4,568,326.55 

$7,214,395.59 

Valuation and Tax: 

Real Estate 

Residential $255,262,800 at $16.40 $4,186,309.38 

Open Space 9,409,000 at $16.40 154,308.93 

Commercial 5,640,000 at $16.40 92,494.91 
Industrial 



$270,311,800 $4,433,113.22 

Personal Property $ 8,244,697 at $16.40 $ 135,213.33 

$278,556,497 $4,568,326.55 

Tax Rate per thousand (1983-84) 

School rate $ 9.15 
General rate 7.25 

$16.40 



73 



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74 



Protection of Persons and Property 



FIRE AND POLICE DEPARTMENT 

D, James Arena, Chief 

The following is a report of activities of the Lincoln Police Department 
for the year 1983: 

Motor Vehicle Enforcement and Investigations: 

Accidents investigated 277 

Accidents with injury 55 

Fatalities 4 

Traffic citations issued 768 

Criminal Law Enforcement and Investigations: 

Report of: 

Break and entry 27 

Larcenies 91 

Stolen cars, bikes 21 

Narcotic law violations 17 

Town ordinance violations 9 

Vandalism 93 

Disturbances 86 

Domestic disputes/civil problems 40 

Reports of attempted crimes 14 

Non-classified 31 

Arrests, motor vehicle § criminal 112 

Miscellaneous Activities: 

Response to alarms 726 

Reports of suspicious persons, cars, 

etc. checked 40 

Animal complaints 205 

Ambulance runs 239 

Assists to other police agencies 68 

Total calls logged 8183 

The year also saw a personnel change with the retirement by reason of 
disability of Officer David Finan. David served with the Department for 
approximately ten years and was a hard working, dedicated officer. After 
an extensive search for a replacement, David Eysie of Norwood, a former 
Hickory, North Carolina police officer was appointed as the newest member 
of the Department. 

Residents are reminded that we have been working with the "Priority One" 
community-wide alliance to prevent crime and as such have materials available 
on request concerning same. Information may be received in this regard 
from Officer Barbara Bardsley, Lincoln Crime Prevention Officer. 

75 



We again extend our thanks to fellow town employees for their coopera- 
tion and to the community at large for its cooperation and support. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

The following is a report of the activities of the Lincoln Fire Depart- 
ment for the year 1983; 



Runs 



Response to accident scenes 86 

Airport runs 24 

Ambulance calls 239 

Brush fires 31 

Building fires 7 

Box alarms, building 49 

False alarms 130 

Investigations 53 

"Lock-outs" 84 

Car fires 26 

Mutual aid requests 33 

Reports of outside burning 14 

Special service 34 

Water problems 23 

Wires down or arcing 14 

Other Activities: 

Burning permits issued 590 

Boxes tested 131 

School fire drills 32 

Inspections 109 

The department continues to maintain an ongoing program of training 
drills for its regular and call department members. Additionally members 
of the department have taken advantage of training seminars offered by the 
Massachusetts Fire Training Academy, 

In December long time Call Deputy Chief Bill Doherty retired from his 
active role with the department. Although he will continue in limited 
service we would comment that his long, dedicated service to the department 
and community is worthy of notice. 

Our thanks to fellow town employees and the community for continued 
cooperation, encouragement and support. 



76 



PARKING CLERK 

Lorraine Dean 

Number of tickets issued 270 

Fines paid 189 

Fines unpaid 81 

Percentage paid 70 



e. 



Total money taken in for the year 1983 - $1087.00 

Total money taken in since 4/1/82 - $2534.25 
(beginning of the town's take-over of the parking tickets) 



77 



BUILDING DEPARTMENT 

Ernest L. Johnson, Building Inspector 
Courtney Atkinson, Assistant Building Inspector 
Kenneth Desmond, Wiring and Fire Alarm Inspector 
Russell J. Dixon, Plumbing and Gas Inspector 
Nancy luelke, Secretary 

During the past year the building department has processed close to 
6 million dollars vorth of new construction. It issued 173 permits worth 
S41,561.00 for an all time high. 

Brooks Hill, Oak Meadow and Smith Hill subdivisions are almost com- 
pletely finished with sold homes. 

A section of the Umbrello land is now being considered for housing for 
the elderly. The "Ricci" land is also under further study by a private 
organization. Only one other subdivision off of Old County Road is being 
considered at this time. 



Enforement of the town's zoning by-laws, a responsibility of the 
Building Inspector, has been especially difficult this year with several 
court cases still pending. The Concord court has been very cooperative 
in aiding this department with its zoning problems. 

Inspections of wood burning stove installations are being very well 
handled by the Fire Department. Residents should note that stove permits 
are still issued from the Building Department at Town Offices and not the 
Fire Department. 

Statistics for the year are as follows: 

Values as submitted by applicants -- 

Building $5,626,962. 

Plumbing 203,560. 

Wiring 157,410 . 

55,987,932. 

Permits issued — 

New residential 25 

Additions & remodelling 54 

Garages, sheds, barns 19 
Solar 

Pools 3 

Greenhouses 6 

Reroofing 12 
Tents (temporary) 

Town buildings renovated 3 

Miscellaneous 1 

Signs 1 

Wood burning stoves 35 

173 



78 



Permit fees collected 

Building 

Plumbing 

Wiring 

Wood Stoves 

Signs 

Fire Alarms 

Recertifications 

$41,561 



$27 ; 


,291. 


5; 


,343. 


7, 


,609. 




975. 




3. 




80. 




260. 



? 



79 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

Ernest L. Johnson 

The General Laws of Massachusetts requires that all devices used 
for weighing or measuring commodities be accurately checked and certified 
at least once a year. 

For the year 1984 the seal is "RED". Look for it on gas pumps 
and scales in grocery stores and road side stands. All devices have 
been checked and certified as follows: 

Scales sealed 12 

Scales not sealed 1 

Gas pumps sealed 39 

Gas pumps not sealed 3 

Total 55 

Fees collected $422.00 



80 



Health and Welfare 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

George P. Faddoul, DVM 
John M. ' Lough 1 in, MD 
William B. Stason, MD, MS, Chairman 

Hight light 

The threat of Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) provided the major 
excitement of 1983. The Board of Health, with the concurrence of the 
Selectmen and Conservation Commission, decided to rejoin the East Middlesex 
Mosquito Control Project and monitor mosquitoes for presence of the virus 
while planning long-term mosquito control measures. Fortunately, the 
summer was dry, the mosquito population low, and no virus was identified 
in the local area. No spraying was done to the delight of conservationists 
and the consternation of mosquito control advocates. The threat of EEE 
persists in 1984 and, again, monitoring will be performed. 

Sanitary Landfill 

Groundwater sampling, done four times during the year, revealed no 
critical contaminants. The westerly third of the landfill has been filled 
to final elevation, and has been graded and sealed with semi -pervious 
fill and peat. 

Subsurface Sewage Disposal Systems 

Site investigations witnessed (i.e. percolation tests 

and test pits.) 25 

New disposal systems inspected and approved 16 

Repaired disposal systems inspected and approved 12 

Systems investigated for accessory apartments 4 

Installers permits issued 12 

Septage handlers equipment inspected and licenses issued 5 

Sanitarian Inspections 

Two inspections were made of local restaurants, supermarkets, cider 
mills, schools and public places holding catered events. No major viola- 
tions were noted, but proprietors were urged to correct a series of minor 
discrepancies. 

Garbage Collection 

The Board of Health provides garbage collection services for residents 
who desire it. The current contract is with Mr. Joseph Cotoni, a Lincoln 
resident, and the current annual cost per resident is $80. Approximately 
220 housholds used this service in 1983. The service is entirely self- 
supporting. 

81 



School Health Program 

Health services in the Lincoln Public Schools continued to be provided 
under separate contracts with the Emerson Hospital Home Care Department for 
nursing services and David McCormack, MD for physician coverage. School 
health aides are hired directly by the Board of Health but are under the 
supervision of the School Nurse. 

Ms. Jan Tuxbury, RN, resigned as School Nurse to take on the challenge 
of raising two adopted children and was replaced by Ms. Alice Bradford, 
The School Nurse, together with Ms. Mary O'Brien and Ms. Anne Mahoney as 
Health Aides and Dr. McCormack, continued to provide a wide range of health 
services, screening and educational programs to the school community. 

The School Health Program functioned smoothly in 1983 and experienced 
no major problems. Comments and suggestions from townspeople on how to 
improve services are welcomed, however. Please direct these either to the 
School Nurse or to the Board of Health. 

Home Health Care Services 

Home visits, provided under contract by Emerson Hospital Home Care 
Department, were reduced from 45 in 1982 to only 9 in 1983, The reduction 
resulted from the substitution of telephone calls for visits where circum- 
stances permitted. Visits to investigate communicable diseases remained 
unchanged. 

To date we have not been made aware of any problems resulting from this 
reduction in home visits. The Board of Health would be extremely interest- 
ed, however, in hearing about any needs for home health services that are 
not now being met. 

Health Promotion Acitivites 

Flu Clinic : 110 persons received vacination for flu or pneumocvecal 
pneumonia in 1983. 

Hypertension and Glaucoma Screening : In conjunction with the Council 
on Aging, the Board of Health provides semi-annual screening clinics. 

Eliot Mental Health Center 

This center provided 3,630 hours of services to 94 Lincoln residents 
in 1983 for a variety of emotional and school-related problems. These 
services are only partially paid for by direct payment by patients or 
insurance. The balance is covered by school contracts, federal and state 
contracts and contributions from participating towns. Lincoln's contribu- 
tion in 1983 was $6,076. 



82 



ANIMAL INSPECTOR 



Jennifer Pettit 



The Animal Inspector's responsibilities are to supply the Department 
of Food and Agriculture, Division of Animal Health, of the Commonwealth with 
a list of animal owners and the numbers, kinds, and the state of health of 
each animal in Lincoln. If any complaints or problems arise with the health 
or care of any livestock in Lincoln the Animal Inspector resolves these 
in accordance with the Town's and State's animal health rules and regulations 

Dog bites are also the responsibility of the Animal Inspector. When 
someone is bitten by a dog, the dog is quarantined for 10 days, observed 
for signs of rabies and, if found healthy, released. 

There has been some concern about rabies in nondomestic animals. 
Often a sick nondomestic animal is suffering from distemper, parasite 
infestation, or other illness, not rabies. In 1983 one mouse, one cat 
(bitten by a bat) and one fox were tested at the State Laboratory Institute, 
Jamaica Plain. All were found to be negative for rabies. 

Every year the Board of Health offers a rabies vaccination clinic 
at the Town Barn. This year 57 dogs were innoculated. 

1983 Inventory of Animals 



Estimated number of barns 


53 


Horses 


64 


Ponies 


22 


Pigs 





Cows 


18 


Goats 


1 


Sheep 


85 


Donkeys 


2 


Mules 





Dog bites 


23 


Mouse bites 


1 


Chipmunck bite. c 


1 



83 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

lit 

Clifford Bowles 

Robert Church 

Beverly Eckhardt 

Mary Ford 

Harry Healey, Treasurer 

Elizabeth Kershaw 

Sally Mansfield, Secretary 

John Manzelli, Vice Chairman 

Ann Paddock 

Anne Satterfield 

Aire -Mai j a Schwann 

Natalie Rudin, Chairperson 

Ruth Kramer, Coordinator 

As the over sixty population in Lincoln increases so has the activities 
of the Council on Aging (COA) . 

One of the most popular and successful programs of the year was our 
Thursday Coffee and Conversation Group. This began in June and continued 
through December. Aire-Maija Schwann and Ann Paddock were in charge of the 
refreshments and Anne Satterfield provided excellent programs. Dr. Lynn 
Weigel generously donated his time and spoke to the older residents on general 
health care at one of the Thursday programs. Anne Satterfield also provided 
programs throughout the year including nutrition, slide presentations, tours 
and movies. John Manzelli kept the over sixty population busy with classes 
in furniture refinishing, flower arranging, lamp shade stenciling, sewing 
and an exercise group. Five bus trips to out-of-town spots of interest 
were provided for the older residents through arrangements with Doherty's 
Bus Services, coordinated by Cliff Bowles. 

During the year, eleven health clinics were held and coordinated by 
Mary Ford. In October, the health clinics were moved from the Pierce House 
to Bemis Hall. Two of these clinics included oral cancer screening, thanks 
to time generously donated by Stephen Cohen, D.M.D. COA also cooperated 
with the Board of Health for a flu protection clinic. 

A request for funds was made in September to the Department of Elder 
Affairs of the Commonwealth under the formula grant program. This source 
provides a fixed amount of money to every community in the state that provides 
a financial statement and a description of the needs to be addressed for the 
benefit of elder residents. The COA was pleased to receive $810.00 from this 
source. With these funds, we were able to hold four podiatric and two audio- 
logy clinics. 

COA was pleased to receive a grant for $429.00 in December from Minute- 
man Home Care Corporation/ Area Agency on Aging, Title III-B. With these 
funds, the COA will hold three workshops on Health Insurance, Home Care and 
Income Maintenance. These workshops are planned for March, May and September. 
The March workshop will be held by the COA and the Friends of the COA. 

The COA continues to study and discuss housing options for the older 
residents. The Council is working with the Housing Commission on the Codman 
Farmhouse which will be shared living for the elderly. Martha DeNormandie, 

84 



an off-Board member of the COA, conducted two series of workshops on Alter- 
native Housing for the Elderly. They discussed and visited alternative 
living accomodations for the senior set. 

The Council on Aging has been extremely fortunate in receiving the help 
of many capable and caring volunteers during the past year. The COA wishes 
to give our sincerest thanks to them. 



FRIENDS OF THE COUNCIL ON AGING 

The Friends of the Council on Aging, the non-profit corporation set up 
in 1982 as the volunteer arm of the COA, has had a busy and productive year. 
We are most grateful to all who responded to our townwide membership appeal 
both in their willingness to contribute their time as volunteers and their 
financial assistance in support of COA activities. 

Our annual meeting in early March featured an excellent panel on housing 
alternatives for older people, which in turn served as a catalyst for further 
thinking and activity on this subject and culminated in the November Town 
Meeting vote to create a shared living facility in the Codman Farmhouse. 
Also Martha DeNormandie, named by the COA as off board member in housing, 
organized two well attended four session workshops on housing alternatives 
which helped many people clarify the options in this complicated field. 
The Friends contributed towards consulting costs for these series. 

Throughout the year the Friends has been instrumental in furnishing the 
COA quarters at Bemis Hall and developing the rooms into an inviting and 
welcoming center for older people. Volunteers, under the leadership of 
Louise Rogers have overseen the maintenance of the areas on a revolving 
weekly basis, and the Hospitality Committee, headed by Amalie Kass, has 
provided refreshments and acted as hostesses for the monthly health clinics 
as well as for other "special occasions". 

The Friends has also been able to subsidize other COA activities 
especially social events and trips which are so important in avoiding feelings 
of isolation in older people, and we have helped in the production and mail- 
ing costs of the Newsletter to inform townspeople of the many activities. 

We welcomed three new members to our Board of Directors this year. 
Louise Rogers, Robert Church and Russell Mahan joined charter members 
Alice Garrison, Amalie Kass and Jane Row. The officers remained Charlotte 
Barnaby, President; Louise Bowles, Treasurer; and Margaret Kirkpatrick, Clerk. 

We feel the Friends of the Council on Aging is now a well established 
entity and we look forward to further service to the town. 



85 



MINUTEMAN HOME CARE CORPORATION (MHCC) 

The Town of Lincoln is one of 16 communities in this region which 
receive social services from the Minuteman Home Care Corporation. Since 
1977, Lincoln has paid an annual "local share" that has entitled it to 
be represented by one voting member and one alternate member on the MHCC 
Board of Members. During 1983, Beverly Eckhardt has been Lincoln's Member, 
serving early in the year as Vice-President and Chairman of the Service 
and By-Laws Committees. In September, Dr. Eckhardt was elected President 
of the Board and Chairman of the Long Range Planning Committee. Lincoln's 
Alternate Member on the MHCC Board is Miriam Korhonen, who has been named 
for the current year to the Service and Social Committees. 

During the fiscal period from 1 July 1982 to 30 June 1983, 13 Lincoln 
residents received homemaker services valued at $14,368 through MHCC. 
In addition, MHCC also administered services to older residents through 
funds of the Older Americans Act, including transportation, nutrition 
programs and information and referral . 

Occasionally, our Council on Aging Coordinator is confronted with 
particularly difficult problems in responding to a referred client's needs. 
Such a client is typically in a deteriorating state of health, with no 
close relatives to provide support. In such instances, the assistance of 
the MHCC Protective Services Worker has been of great value. In 1983, the 
salary of the MHCC Protective Services Worker was paid primarily from money 
raised in MHCC's private fund raising drive, to which Lincoln residents 
contributed $1115. MHCC is continuing its private fund raising efforts in 
1984, and will again use this source of money to pay for a full time worker. 

The incorporators of MHCC established the local share assessment for 
each member town in 1976 in order to meet the requirement of a one -quarter 
local match to qualify for federal funds under Title III of the Older 
Americans Act. The dollar amount of each share was based upon the number of 
low-income residents living in each of the 16 communities of the region. 
Although the amount of Title III funds have risen yearly to a 1984 total of 
$479,452. local shares remained constant. This past October, with 1980 
Federal Census data available, the MHCC Board approved a re-evaluation of all 
local shares. New assessed amounts have been computed by taking into account 
the 60-plus population of each town and the Consumer Price Index of inflation 
for the current year. In fiscal 1985, the town of Lincoln will be asked to 
pay $344 as its local share. The $344 amount is Obtained by adding to the 
base of $198 a 3.5% inflation adjustment of $7 and $139 reflecting a 70 
percent increase in our 60-plus population since 1970. 



86 



DOG OFFICER 

Jennifer Pet tit 

The following is a report of my activities as Dog Officer from July, 
1982 through June, 1983: 

The 3524 calls consist of lost, found or strayed dogs, problems at 
the schools, complaints, neighborhood problems, chasing and harassing people, 
chasing and killing livestock, animals hit by cars, information, adoption, 
and problems with cats, skunks, racoons, horses, cows, pigs, etc. There 
was a report of a cougar sighting and a dead coyote was found on Route 2A 
neaT* the landfill. A record system kept daily and the town and state dog 
regulations have helped find solutions for all the different kinds of 
problems. 

The established communication with Dog Officers of neighboring towns 
and the Lost Pet Hot Line has helped in the effort to match lost and found 
dogs with their owners. The Buddy Dog Humane Society, Northeast Animal 
Shelter, and Metropolitan Assistance Aids have been a great help in placing 
stray dogs from the pound in good homes. I would also like to thank the 
Police, and Fire Department and all the people who have assisted me with 
a variety of problems. 

I would like to take this opportunity to remind all dog owners that 
dogs must be licensed and the tag must be on the dog at all times. An 
important reason for the tag is that in the event that your dog is lost 
or injured, you can be notified immediately and perhaps save its life. 

The total number of calls have almost doubled from the past year due 
to the availability of a full time animal control officer at the Town Offices 

Statistics on Activities of Dog Officer 

July, 1982 through June, 1983 

Calls 

Lost Dogs 526 

Found Dogs 923 

Complaints 603 

Other animals 221 

Dog bites 106 

Dead-hit animals 119 

Vet 47 

Cats 270 

Information 709 

Total Calls 3,524 



87 



NORTH EAST SOLID WASTE COMMITTEE 

Henry J. Rugo, Town Representative 



Formal acceptance of the North East Solid Waste Committee CNESWC) 
Service Agreement by 22 municipalitites activated the project by permit- 
ting the financing plan to be put into effect. A $197,000,000 revenue 
bond offering, by the Industrial Development Financing Authority of the 
Town of North Andover as issuer, found a ready market for delivery late in 
April. Rather vexing delays, caused by complications arising from the 
unusual nature of the offering, were rewarded by fortuitous changes in the 
interest rates. Since debt service is a large fraction of the expected 
project operating cost, this development can only have an effect that is 
markedly advantageous to the contract communities over the 20-year life of 
the contract. 

Since the commencement date of May 27, 1983, detailed design and 
construction of the facility has been proceeding ahead of schedule. 
Scheduled completion date is May 27, 1986; past performance of the 
contractor on a recent similar project, actual versus projected per cent 
completion, and signficant bonus for early completion suggest that 
expectation of an earlier date may not be wholly unreasonable. 

The Commonwealth has negotiated an agreement with the City of Peabody 
for space in its expanded landfill for interim, residue and back-up use by 
the NESWC communities. 

During the present construction period as well as during the 
operating period covered by the Service Agreement, the interests of the 
Contract Communities will be monitored and directed as to policy by the 
Advisory Board, on which each Community has a representative. More 
immediate control of Community interests is exercised by a nine-member 
Executive Committee, the quasi-monthly meetings of which are actively 
monitored by the Lincoln representative. The day-to-day activities of the 
NESWC project are followed for the Communities by the Contract Community 
Representative (CCR), which function is currently being carried out by the 
Commonwealth's Bureau of Solid Waste Disposal (BSWD), reporting to the 
Executive Committee, under an agreement signed in October, 1983. 
Reimbursement of BSWD expense is to be made ultimately from project funds 
once the facility begins to operate. 

Consulting-engineering and project coordinating services are 
provided, under contract with the BSWD in the Community interests, by Roy 
F. Weston, Inc. personnel who had been associated in a related capacity 
during the planning phase of the project. 



88 



During the "shake-down" period of the project especially, provisions 
for all necessary functions in the Contract Communities' interest are 
under constant review and adjustment because there is no precedent for 
this set of relationships. 

The principal task remaining to be done before the resource recovery 
facility begins to operate is the development of an acceptable plan for 
collecting the Town's solid waste and hauling it to North Andover. 

Active participation in 128 West Resource Recovery Council planning 
by the Town representative was terminated this year. 



89 



Planning and Public Works 



PLANNING BOARD 

F. Douglas Adams 
Basil C. Chigas 
William G. Constable 
Warren F. Flint, Jr. 
Rosamond P. Delori, Chairman 

The Planning Board spent a substantial portion of 1983 planning for the 
future of North Lincoln. For years the Board has walked a fine line, 
pursuading developers to leave the proposed corridor for a Northern Alignment 
of Route 2 undeveloped, while feeling frustrated by our inability to 
effectively plan for long range land use in North Lincoln because no real 
resolution of the Route 2 question existed. Late in 1982 the Board was faced 
with a development scheme on the 100-acre Ricci Farm field which lay directly 
in the path of the proposed Northern Alignment and its connection to Hanscom 
Field. The developers were operating under the most recent information 
available from the State DPW, i.e., that a new northern artery of Route 2 was 
not a priority in the foreseeable future. Their development, unlike others 
we had seen recently (Brooks Hill and Smith Hill) could not be designed so as 
to co- exist on the site with the new highway that has remained a priority of 
Lincoln town boards. The Board realized that such a development might 
preclude the possibility of the Northern Alignment ever being built and went 
to the Town Meeting in March, 1983, with motions to stop building for one 
year while the town took a crucial look at North Lincoln. 

With the passage of the North Lincoln Building Moratorium, the Planning 
Board appointed the North Lincoln Study Committee, headed by Robert Lemire, 
comprised of representatives from the Conservation Commission, Planning 
Board, Selectmen, and Long Range Planning Committee, whose task it has been 
to carry out a year- long study of North Lincoln. More specifically, the 
NLSC has used the Caswell Traffic Model to predict traffic patterns in the 
area in the year 2000 under varying scenarios as well as to investigate the 
potential for commercial development of 47 acres of residential property 
bordered by the Minute Man National Historical Park and Hanscom Field. A 
final report of the NLSC is included here following this report. The most 
significant finding of the NLSC was an affirmation that Route 2 as presently 
configured along with Route 2A will be incapable of handling traffic growth 
by 2000. 

In order to provide a forum for debate and reporting, as well as to 
meet the needs of the Conservation Commission and the Housing Commission, the 
Planning Board initiated planning for what became the October 29, 1983 Land 
Use Conference, "Route to Tommorrow: Challenges and Choices." Again, a 
subcommittee was appointed, headed by Susan Fargo. We refer you to the 
report of this committee. The conference provided the board with significant 
input, including the following areas of consensus: 

1. Traffic and the future of Route 2 were critical to 80% of the 363 
respondents to the conference questionnaire. 

90 



2. The 47 acres should not be rezoned for commercial use without 
further study of all the impacts of such action. 

3. Protection of the Northern Alignment of Route 2 (the Ricci parcel) 
through outright purchase was not an overwhelming priority, although 
it appeared that those attending the conference wished to see the 
Town continue to investigate ways of preserving undeveloped parcels 
until they might be used for a road. 

In preparation for the lifting of the Moratorium in March, 1984, and 
because of new development proposals for the Ricci Farm, the Board has 
commissioned independent appraisals of that parcel. The board has also 
included a questionnaire with the annual town census prefaced by arguments 
for and against a northern alignment, polling the residents (as opposed to 
those who answered the Conference Questionnaire) as to their preference on 
the ultimate location of Route 2. With these two pieces of information, the 
Board will make proposals to the March Town Meeting that we hope will contri- 
bute to a resolution of the Route 2 question. 

Apart from the ongoing question of North Lincoln, the Planning Board has 
continued to propose zoning amendments, review subdivisions and special permit 
applications, as well as represent the land use interest of the town on 
several committees. A brief summary of these activities follows: 

Zoning Amendments: 

1. Unregistered Cars -- An amendment to the Zoning By-law was passed 
prohibiting the ungaraged storage of more than two unregistered 
cars in the residential districts of Lincoln. This amendment was 
proposed in response to citizen concern about uncontrolled storage 
of unregistered vehicles on several parcels in Lincoln. 

2. Internally Lit Signs -- An amendment to the sign provisions of the 
Zoning By-law was passed allowing the Planning Board to issue 
special permits for internally lit signs. This amendment was 
proposed to add flexibility to relatively new sign provisions. The 
Sign Committee, chaired by Barry Solar, has continued efficiently in 
the review of sign applications and its recommendations to the Board 
have permitted even-handed enforcement of the by-law. 

Zoning Enforcement: 

The Planning Board has worked closely with the Selectmen and the Zoning 
Enforcement Officer (the Building Inspector) to enforce the Zoning By-law. 
Using the relatively new device of non-criminal violation fines, we have been 
successful at reminding property owners of their obligation to conform with 
the Zoning By-law. 

Subdivisions: 

1. Ricci Farm -- In our last annual report, it appeared that a 

rezoning to R-3 would be proposed at the March, 1983 Annual Town 
Meeting. The developers chose not to proceed with this proposal. 
Although we have no confirmation from them, we believe that they 
determined that the project was not viable due to the high water 

91 



table and extensive wetlands on this site. 

2. Brooks Hill -- This subdivision is now complete, all covenants and 
escrow accounts having been released. 

3. Smith Hill, Oak Meadow, and Umbrello — These cluster subdivisions 
are near completion. The Board is working closely with Frank Emmons, 
the Town Engineer, to be sure that work is completed to the Town's 
satisfaction before the final release of Town control. 

4. Warbler Springs -- During 1983 a cluster subdivision into 19 lots 
was proposed for the Connolly land fronting on Tower Road. The 
proposal was complicated by a proposed subdivision of contiguous 
land in Weston accessed through Lincoln by the Connolly subdivision 
road. The Town of Weston has serious questions about this access 
from the start and ultimately did not approve the subdivision in 
Weston. Although the cluster plan in Lincoln seemed viable, the 
developer chose not to go forward with plans in Lincoln at this time. 

Bike Paths: 

1. Old Brooks Road -- The Conservation Commission and Planning Board 
have agreed on construction of the final connector to Oak Knoll, and 
we anticipate completion of the connector in the Spring of 1984. 

2. Concord Road -- 1983 saw the construction of the Concord Road Path. 
After years of struggle to design and obtain state approval and 
funding, bids were solicited and accepted. We are grateful to the 
Town Engineer, Frank Emmons, and the Bike Path Committee, co-chaired 
by Bob Cunningham and Linda Svetz, for their help in completing this 
project and we look forward to working with them in the future. 

Other Committees: 

1. Long Range Planning Committee -- The LRPC published the results and 
some initial analyses of the questionnaire mailed with the 1982 
town census. This demographic profile of Lincoln as it entered the 
1980' s will be a valuable planning resource to the town as we 
assess needs and goals for the future. 

2. Winter Street Task Force -- The Planning Board has worked closely 
with the Selectmen and members of this task force to articulate 
Lincoln's concerns to state agencies about the negative impact on 
traffic in Lincoln that will result from the development of the 
Kennedy Pig Farm in Waltham by Bay Colony. 

3. Hans com Area Traffic Committee -- This committee of representatives 
from Bedford, Concord, Lexington and Lincoln is nearing completion 
of its traffic study of the Hanscom area. We anticipate that 
significant conclusions about optimal road configurations in the 
Hanscom area will be available in February, 1984. 

4. Joint Committees -- The Board has joined with the Selectmen to 
study: a.) Lewis Street parking, traffic patterns, road alignment, 

92 



and land use; b.) traffic in order to develop a long range plan 
for coping with projected increases in traffic in Lincoln. The 
Board is also working with the Housing Commission on a number of 
Zoning By-law amendments that will further promote diverse housing 
in Lincoln. They include liberalizing the accessory apartment 
provisions of the by-law and possibly linking subdivision approval 
to provisions of affordable housing. 

It should be obvious from this report that it has been an extraordinarily 
busy year for the Planning Board. It was also a year of significant delega- 
tion of responsibility to subcommittees and friends of the Board in order to 
get the job done. We are deeply grateful to those who have so generously 
devoted themselves to the seemingly impossible tasks we have charged them 
with. We could never have accomplished what has been accomplished on our 
own. Thank you all. 



93 



BOARD OF APPEALS 

Jane Cooper Brayton 

D f Arcy G. MacMahon 

Mary W. Sheldon 

David F, Sykes 

James F. McHugh, Chairman 

Morton B, Braun, Associate Member 
Margaret B. Marsh, Associate Member 

During 1983 the Board of Appeals received twenty-one applications 
and held fifteen public hearings. Eleven of the applications were for 
special permits- Nine of these were granted, one was postponed and one 
deemed "not needed". The remaining ten applications were for variances, 
seven of which were granted and three withdrawn. None were denied. In 
addition, seven apartment permits were renewed. 

Throughout the year the Board of Appeals attempted to carry out its 
three primary responsibilities in keeping with the general purposes and 
intent of the Town's Zoning By-laws and the General Laws of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts, i.e., deciding appeals, deciding requests for special 
permits, and deciding requests for variances. 

During the year the Board took the opportunity to meet with the 
Selectmen, the Planning Board, and the Town Moderator to enhance the general 
understanding of the constraints imposed by Massachusetts Law on the Board's 
power to grant variances. As a result of that meeting and a number of 
instructive letters to the editor of the Concord Journal from long time 
Town residents, there now seems to be better understanding among the Town's 
officials and citizenry that unlike its broad discretionary power when 
acting on applications for special permits, the Board's power to grant a 
variance is narrowly constrained by Massachusetts law, law superimposed 
on the requirements of the Town's by-law itself. The Massachusetts statute 
dealing with variances is not simply a mechanism for enabling people to 
escape routinely from the by-law's literal terms. Instead, the statute 
requires that everyone be bound by the literal terms of the by-law unless 
those terms will result in extreme "hardship". Moreover, not just any 
hardship will suffice. The "hardship" necessary for a variance must be 
one which springs directly from soil conditions, shape or topography unique 
to a landowner's property. The "hardship" also must be one which, in 
essence, would render that property useless for all practical purposes 
unless the variance were granted and it cannot be one that property owners 
bring upon themselves either by spending money or by misplacing foundations 
or other structures. 

As in past years, the Board continues to rely on, and to receive, 
the assistance of numerous other Town boards in connection with the appli- 
cations presented to it. It remains grateful for that assistance. In 
the same vein, the Board extends again a particular note of thanks to 
Nancy Zuelke, its Clerk, for her continuing careful attnetion to the 
administrative details so necessary for its continued efficient operation. 

Finally, the other members of the Board wish to thank Jim McHugh, 

94 



who goes off the Board in January, 1984, for his countless hours of service 
to the Town in his role as Chairman. For his unstinting sense of fairness, 
his firm and equitable way of dealing with all parites, and his resilience 
to pressure from special interests, the Town will be forever grateful. We 
shall miss his imagination and good humor. 



95 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Kenneth Bassett 

Joseph Bower 

Lee Dane 

John Lee 

Robert Mack 

William Rizzo 

J. Quincy Adams, Chairman 

This year marked the end of a long membership on the Commission by 
William Preston. Bill has been a member of the Conservation Commission 
since 1969 and his love of open land and wildlife was reflected in his steady 
contribution to the Commission's work. Because he was also chairman of the 
Lincoln Land Trust, he contributed greatly to the coordination between the 
activities of the two organizations. His service and knowledge will be 
missed. His vacancy is filled by Mr. John Lee who adds to the Commission 
valuable knowledge of farming. 

Acquisition Program 

In November, the Town took a major step forward by voting to acquire 
the remaining property of the Sandy Pond Trust that was adjacent to the Sandy 
Pond Reservoir. This watershed land is now permanently protected. The 
acquisition also makes available for other conservation purposes land that 
is centrally located and is of great beauty. In particular, key trails 
linking the area near the schools with Sandy Pond and Adams Woods are now 
preserved. 

In preparation for the Town Meeting and to support a fund-raising 
program for the Sandy Pond Trust land acquisition, the Commission held more 
than twenty neighborhood meetings. In the end the goal of raising more than 
$500,000 was achieved, the vote in Town Meeting was overwhelming, and the 
Town concluded the necessary action by voting to exempt the borrowing for 
this acquisition from the provisions of Proposition 2\. 

Nathalie Rice, the Administrator of the Commission, deserves great 
credit for her extensive contributions to this effort, preparing the brochure 
mailed to the Town, preparing and delivering the slide presentation at all 
the meetings and hearings, and coordinating the activities of the Commission 
members. Also invaluable were the efforts of Warren Flint, Sr. , consultant 
to the Commission, who managed the fund-raising effort, kept the books, and 
personally carried out a major portion of the drive. Special thanks are 
due to Mr. Kenneth Olsen, the Rural Land Foundation, and the Baker Bridge/ 
Sandy Pond neighbors who made major gifts to the program. 

During the year the Commission also received a generous gift of land 
from Mr. and Mrs. Henry Spencer of Lincoln Road. Their gift provides the 
first building block for a possible trail connecting Beaver Pond and the 
schools. The Commission is very appreciative of this gift and will continue 
to work toward completion of the acquisition goals identified in the Town's 
1977 Open Space Plan. 



96 



Wetlands 

The Commission held seven wetlands hearings, primarily in connection 
with the construction of houses, driveways and ponds. 

In May of the year, the Commission was presented with a report on 
Lincoln's groundwater. The report, entitled "Groundwater Protection: Town 
of Lincoln", was completed by four graduate students at Tufts University. 
Nathalie Rice, one of the four students, supervised the project on behalf 
of the Commission. Advisors to the project were members William Rizzo 
and Lee Dane, and geologist Leona Champeny. 

Conservation Land Management 

The following are reports of activities taking place on Lincoln's 
conservation land in 1983: 

Ranger Program : Conservation Rangers continue to deal with public use 
problems such as motor vehicles on trails, drinking, unauthorized swimming, 
parking violations, and in the winter during ski season, general crowd 
control. This year the Commission hired a Ranger/Technician, Robert Benson, 
who works both on the conservation crew and as a Ranger. The position of 
Ranger Naturalist has been eliminated. Robert Benson and Nathalie Rice 
supervised two summer Rangers, who included Mary Ellen Reardon and Lincoln 
resident, Barbara Dane. 

The Commission was especially fortunate in having the volunteer help 
of Barbara Dane from April through August. Barbie worked part-time in the 
office and lent her artistic talent and countless hours to the Sandy Pond 
Trust Acquisition and to a land use report on the Sandy Pond area. Working 
under the Commission's internship program, Connecticut College senior, Mary 
Ellen Reardon, volunteered full-time during the month of January. She 
contributed to an ongoing report on the past land use of the Sandy Pond 
area. Kip Graham, a second intern, completed a forest inventory of Pine 
Hill during the spring and early summer. 

Rangers estimate that there were 65,000 to 70,000 person -visits to 
Lincoln's conservation land in 1983. A large percentage of this total 
includes winter skiers who flock to Lincoln to take advantage of our 35+ 
miles of trails. 

Farmland Program : In the 1983 growing season, 135 acres of agricultural 
land was rented] 47 acres to nursery and vegetable crops, and 88 acres to 
hay. Total farmland revenue was $2,945. The agricultural future of the 
St. Anne's fields was temporarily challenged during the spring and summer 
by the work of an ambitious beaver. Its dam at the lower end of the St. 
Anne's ponds raised the water level considerably, and threatened Concord 
Nursery's standing stock. After lengthy deliberations, countless dam break- 
ings, and an attempt to construct a beaver-proof culvert, the Commission 
regretfully decided to ask the State to trap the lone beaver. It was be- 
lieved that the beaver swam up Beaver Dam Brook from the Sudbury River, 
finally settling in the St. Anne's ponds. The beaver is now a resident of 
the Nashua River, 



97 



The management work conducted on Lincoln's conservation land is under- 
taken by a conservation crew consisting of Conservation Land Manager, Michael 
Murphy, Arborist/Technician, Richard Lachapelle and Ranger/Technician, Robert 
Benson. The Commission is greatly appreciative of their fine work on 
Lincoln's trails, fields and woodlands. 

Trails : The most important addition to the trail system this year was a 
private connector which was cut between Mt. Misery and Adams Woods. Nearly 
2,000 feet in length, it winds its way from the Mt. Misery fields through 
a magnificent hemlock grove, along an open meadow, up and down slopes and 
across two beautifully constructed bridges. The trail is open to the 
public courtesy of the owners of the land over which it passes. The Commis- 
sion extends its appreciation to these individuals and families for making 
a much desired trail possible. Additionally, trail work was undertaken at 
Adams Woods where severely gullied trails were rerouted and fire vehicle 
access trails were upgraded. At Mt. Misery, hazardous trees were removed 
from trail edges, including lightning-struck White Pines. The lumber from 
these Pines was later used for bridge decking on the Mt. Misery-Adams Woods 
connector. Work at Tanner's Brook has just been started, where trails will 
be upgraded and erosion control measures undertaken. 

Fields : Brush was cleared from the edges of Codman fields; and at Valley 
Brook, the Warner parcel and Tanner's Brook, old fields were restored to a 
more open appearance. 

Woodlands : As mentioned, a student intern, Kip Graham, completed a forest 
inventory of Pine Hill. No forest thinning was completed this year however. 

In addition to special projects and routine maintenance on conservation land, 
the conservation crew undertakes numerous other responsibilities such as 
roadside tree planting, thinning to favor developing roadside tree saplings, 
and prevention of Dutch Elm disease. This year a great deal of time was 
also spent on the Concord Road bikepath. Where construction for the path 
passed through conservation land, the crew removed trees and brush, preserved 
shade trees and natural vegetative buffers and opened and rebuilt stonewalls. 



98 



LAND-USE CONFERENCE COMMITTEE 

Eleanor Gallitano 

Ann Gannett 

Susan Goodrich 

John Lee 

Richard Reece 

Paul Svetz 

Ruth Wales 

Susan Fargo, Chairman 

Early in 1983 several critical and complex planning issues confronted 
the town. Pressures for development in North Lincoln and throughout the 
region and increasing traffic townwide prompted town officials to propose a 
fall land use conference to seek guidance from the community. The need to 
reexamine the town's long-standing policy of advocating a northern realign- 
ment of Route 2 became crucial in the winter with the proposed development of 
the Ricci farmland in North Lincoln. At the same time, another "hot spot" 
simmered on the town's eastern border in the Winter Street area where 
proposed office park construction and expansion in Waltham threatened to have 
a major traffic impact on the town's roadways. 

An additional impetus for a community forum was the Sandy Pond Trust's 
offer to the town of a chance to buy several pieces of key watershed land; 
the town's Open Space Plan of 1977 needed review and updating, In light of 
recent town meeting defeats of two housing proposals for the Umbrello land, 
residents also needed to consider the town's future course of action in 
housing. 

An underlying motivation for a conference was the need perceived to 
bring residents of the town together -- at a forum without the immediate 
pressure of a town meeting vote -- to express their feelings on these issues, 
which affect not just neighborhoods but the town as a whole. 

Consequently, the Annual Town Meeting in March 1983 appropriated 
$5,000 for a conference to examine these land-use concerns. Later added to 
that appropriation were $2,000 in funds remaining from the Neighborhood Lot 
Program of 1977 and $1,000 appropriated by a Special Town Meeting Nov. 15, 
1983. 

In late May the Planning Board appointed the Land-Use Conference 
Committee with a three- fold charge: to develop and distribute pertinent 
background information townwide before the conference; to plan and organize 
a conference; and to prepare a permanent record of the proceedings. The 
issues to be addressed in some form fell within the general categories of 
open space; housing; planning issues in North Lincoln; and options for 
controlling traffic generated by growth outside the town's borders. 

The committee, meeting on a weekly basis, was faced with several 
challenges: the limited time available in which to organize a conference; 
the range and complexity of the issues; and the need to coordinate the efforts 
of several other committees and individuals. Immediate tasks were the 
creation of a conceptual framework to encompass the issues; development of an 
appropriate conference format; the preparation and distribution of the 
necessary preconference materials; and formulation of a questionnaire. 

99 



Over the summer, "Route to Tomorrow: Challenges and Choices" took shape. 
The title of both conference and preconference booklet was chosen to reflect 
the unique nature of this event at which regional pressures for growth and 
development and traffic -- concomitants of the Age of High Tech -- were major 
themes. Also intended was an open-ended forum at which townspeople could 
explore together the problems and options, rather than be presented with 
predetermined solutions. 

The committee opted for a one-day conference on Saturday, Oct. 29. The 
Bemis Trustees provided support by scheduling a lecture the evening before 
to place the conference issues in a larger, more global perspective. The 
Trustees invited William K. Reilly, President of the Conservation Foundation 
in Washington, D.C., to speak on Friday, Oct. 28, on planning issues and 
approaches both in the United States and abroad. 

The conference at Brooks School on the following day was divided into 
two halves, morning and afternoon; each consisted of a plenary session 
followed by workshops held in classrooms throughout Brooks and Smith schools, 
each with a discussion leader, a recorder and identical sets of questions. 
The large group discussions, in conjunction with the preconference booklets, 
were aimed at providing residents with information and viewpoints on the 
issues, to aid discussion in the workshops. Residents were assigned at random 
to the groups to insure a different mix of people morning and afternoon. 

The morning general session contained several components. Focusing on 
the issues of traffic, pressures from growth and development, and Route 2, 
the session was informational and factual, rather than philosophical, in 
nature. Robert A. Lemire began the morning with a presentation entitled, 
"Lincoln: Wiring for the Age of High Tech." A panel of four, representing 
several interested regional or state entitities, reacted to the issues 
presented and responded to audience questions posed by Moderator Denny Lawton 
of the Metropolitan Area Planning Council. 

Panelists included: Norman Faramelli, Director of Planning at Massport; 
Robert Nash, Superintendent of Minute Man National Historical Park; Kenneth 
Kruckemeyer, Associate Commissioner of the Massachusetts Department of Public 
Works; and Jacquelyn Smith, Chairman of the Lexington Planning Board and 
member of the Massport Board of Directors. 

The afternoon was devoted to housing and open space concerns, In the 
auditorium session, John Quincy Adams and Kenneth Bassett of the Conservation 
Commission presented, respectively, an overview of the Open Space Plan and an 
outstanding collection of aerial slides of Lincoln by photographer Alex 
MacLean. The Housing Commission's presentation which followed was a discussion 
modelled after the television program "Miller's Court." Led by Charles 
Kindleberger, a panel of Lincoln residents expressed a diversity of opinions 
on the issue of housing for moderate income and elderly needs. The afternoon 
Moderator was Margaret Marsh. 

Opening the day was a slide show, "Lincoln Seen," compiled by Richard 
Reece from the slide collections of several residents. By popular request, 
that evocative picture of Lincoln was shown again during the lunch break, when 
it was accompanied by the flute performances of Jane Moss and Ethel Farny, 
Lunch, prepared by students from Minuteman Regional Vocational Tech. School, 

100 



offered a choice between spinach salad or a sandwich, fruit and dessert. 
The plenary sessions were recorded on audio tape with the assistance of the 
Audio-Visual Department of Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School. The tapes 
are available at the Lincoln Public Library. 

The publication, "Route to Tomorrow: Challenges and Choices," containing 
reports authored by several groups and individuals, was distributed to house- 
holds by the Boy Scouts, beginning the weekend of October 15. The 103-page 
booklet was planned as a workbook of background information on the region, 
the roads, North Lincoln, housing and open space. Also included were 
additional resource materials on local zoning, municipal needs and past 
planning efforts. The undertaking, which required enormous cooperation among 
the contributing committees, culminated in an intense week of activity in 
late September to get the manuscript to the printer by an October 1 deadline. 

Another public informational effort was a bus tour on October 15 organized 
by Diana Smith which visited areas of concern around Winter Street, Route 2, 
and in North Lincoln. 

Publicity efforts included a telephone "tree" organized by the League of 
Women Voters, with the aid of the Council on Aging and the Garden Club; 
press releases and other newspaper coverage; attractive posters, and a 
30- foot banner which hung over Lincoln Road. The committee also arranged for 
a series of articles to appear on the editorial page of the Lincoln Edition 
of the Concord Journal in the weeks preceding the conference. Written by 
town residents, these articles provided additional information on the issues 
to be discussed at the conference. 

On Saturday, Oct. 29, at least 504 people attended and engaged in the 
day-long dialogue, which was spirited and informed. The mood of the day was 
upbeat, prompting one participant to characterize the proceedings as a 
"magnificent tribal occasion." The committee's final task was to prepare and 
print an account of the day, based on the recorders ' notes and the 363 
questionnaires returned by residents. Robert Pinto provided invaluable 
assistance in the computerized tabulation and analysis of the questionnaires. 

The efforts of the committee in carrying out its charge would have been 
impossible without the selfless and enthusiastic contributions of so many in 
this community-wide event. Our thanks go also to our predecessors, those 
who planned and executed earlier conferences in 1970 and 1977, and from whom 
we learned a great deal. 



101 



NORTH LINCOLN STUDY COMMITTEE 

Basil Chigas 

Warren Flint, Jr. 

Raymond Johnson 

Mary Helen Lorenz 

Robert Pinto 

William Rizzo 

Robert Lemire, Chairman 

The North Lincoln Study Committee was formed by the Planning Board in 
December 1982. Its purpose was to take a fresh look at pressures for change 
in the area of Lincoln north of Route 2 so that clearly stated and broadly 
supported land use objectives can be set for that area, based on well 
defined policies with practical implementation techniques, mechanisms and 
resources. 

Early observations pointed to the need for a building moratorium in 
order to delay proposed development of the 116-area Ricci and Guirleo 
properties, which would seriously impair the feasibility of relocating 
Route 2 to a northern alignment in accordance with long-standing town policy, 
or connecting the Hanscom access road with Route 2. A one-year moratorium 
was approved at the March, 1983 Town Meeting. 

The Committee met over 30 times, participated in several Planning Board 
hearings, made a preliminary report of its findings to the March, 1983 Town 
Meeting, presented its findings in the pre- conference report published before 
the October, 1983 Land Use Conference, and made a presentation of those 
findings at the conference. The results of that conference will be published 
in 1984. 

The Committee focused on three major issues. These were: 

1. Route 2 location options and relative traffic and land use impacts 
on area residents, the whole town, through traffic, the Massport/ 
Hanscom complex, and Minute Man National Historical Park. 

2. The impact of the optional corridor takings on individual landowners 
situated in both the present and northern corridors. 

3. The possible rezoning of 46.7 privately held acres situated between 
Minute Man Park and Massport for office park purposes. 

Much of our work was made possible by a grant of $2,000 by the Trustees 
of the Ogden Codman Trust, of which $510 remained unspent as of December 31, 
1983. We are particularly grateful to the Trustees for their early response 
to our request for assistance so that work could begin in early 1983. The 
Committee will cease to function at the March, 1984 Town Meeting. 



102 



LINCOLN LAND CONSERVATION TRUST 

Robert C. Brannen 

William G. Constable 

William A. King 

John D. Lee 

John F. Loud, Treasurer 

Margaret B. Marsh 

Samuel G. Mygatt 

Robert H. Webb, Secretary 

William M. Preston, Chairman 

During 1983, the Trust received a gift of 0.66 acres of land from Mr. 
and Mrs. Peter Schliemann and Mr. and Mrs. David B. Mosher; it is shown as 
Lot #72-11.01 on the assessors' map of their development on Silver Hill 
Road. No new conservation restrictions were received in this period. 

By far the most noteworthy conservation event of 1983 was the acqui- 
sition by the Town of the greater part of the land offered for sale by the 
Sandy Pond Trust. This included most of the remaining privately-owned 
shoreline of Sandy Pond and its watershed. A significant portion of the 
purchase price was raised from private sources, which included a donation 
of $8,000 by the Land Trust and one of $50,000 by the Rural Land 
Foundation. 

It is interesting to recall that in 1957 the land around Sandy Pond 
was almost entirely privately owned. At that time, as the result of a 
death in the Wheeler family, a shore lot of somewhat over 3 acres owned by 
the estate was put on the market. It is designated "No. 1" on the Trail 
Map. It was immediately realized that to allow this lot to be developed 
would be to set a dangerous precedent and to make it much more difficult 
to protect the remainder of the watershed. A meeting of interested people 
was called; it resulted in the prompt organization of the non-profit, tax- 
exempt Lincoln Land Conservation Trust. In very short order, the entire 
purchase price of $11,500 was raised by public subscription and the land 
bought and permanently protected as "conservation land", the first in 
Lincoln, (it was not until the following year that the Town Conservation 
Commission was formed.) This was only the first battle in a campaign 
extending over many years to protect Lincoln's reservoir; it was crowned 
by success exactly a quarter of a century later at the Town Meeting last 
November. We owe a debt of gratitude to the literally hundreds of our 
fellow citizens who have contributed time and effort to this complex and 
difficult project; we may be proud also that the Town had the wisdom to 
support them with its votes, right down the line! 



103 



A completely revised Land Trust Trail and Conservation Map was put on 
sale at the Town Offices last June. The length of public trails in 
Lincoln shown on it may be broken down as follows: 



On Town-owned land 21.6 miles 

On Land Trust land 8.1 miles 

On private land 14.4 miles 

On minor public roads 1.7 miles 






Total 45.8 miles 

Acquisition of the Sandy Pond Trust property transferred 2.1 miles of 
important connector trails from "private" to "Town-owned" in the table 
above . 

During the past summer we were fortunate to have a particularly 
capable and dedicated trail crew: Michael Krembs and Mark Hart, both 
students at Andover Newton Theological School. Braving extreme heat, 
humidity, fierce mosquitoes and poison ivy they put in 487 hours clearing 
and widening trails, felling leaning trees, spraying poison ivy and 
opening up back land growing up in brush. Close coordination was 
maintained with the Conservation Commission's Michael Murphy. 









104 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



ADAMS WOODS ESCROW ACCOUNT 



Balance 12/31/82 

Principal, Fidelity Cash Reserves 
Interest accrued 

Paid 1/2/83, third Adams installment 
Principal 
Interest 



Interest accrued in 1983 

Balance, 12/31/83 

Principal, Fidelity Cash Reserves 
Interest accrued 



225,000.00 
69.747.96 



112,500.00 
28.995.23 



112,500.00 
54.296.61 



294,747.96 



141.495.23 
153,252.73 

13.543.88 
166,796.61 



166,796.61 



EXCLUDING ADAMS WOODS ESCROW ACCOUNT 



Balance 12/31/82 

Harvard Trust 

Fidelity Cash Reserves (J.W.P.) 

Fidelity Daily Income Trust 
Received 

Contributions 

Sales of trail maps 

Rent of fields 

Herman land, Final pledge and matching funds 

Interest: Harvard Trust 

Fidelity Cash Reserves (J.W.P.) 
Fidelity Daily Income Trust 

Expenses 

New trail map revision 
Printing and postage 
Trails - wages and supplies 
Social Security taxes 
New brush cutter and chain saw 
Workmen's Compensation insurance 
General Liability insurance 
Miscellaneous 

Gift to Town of Lincoln toward Sandy Pond 
Trust Land 



Balance 12/31/83 
Harvard Trust 

Fidelity Cash Reserves (J.W.P.) 
Fidelity Daily Income Trust 



3,837.89 
6,472.29 
14.311.84 24,622.02 



4,600.00 
530.00 
200.00 

2,000.00 
184.36 
571.17 

1.453.17 



1,961.00 
480.32 

3,683.39 
456.81 
699.90 
214.00 
372.00 
37.30 

8.000.00 



9.538.70 
34,160.72 



15.904.72 
18,256.00 



1,447.53 
7,043.46 
9.765.01 18,256.00 



105 



HOUSING COMMISSION 

Raymond A. Johnson 

Mary Helen Lor en z 

Katherine S. McHugh 

William B. Russell 

Elizabeth J. Snelling, Chairman 



At the Special Town Meeting on November 15th, the Housing Com- 
mission's proposal for the Codman farmhouse, which included the 
total interior renovation, construction of a modest addition in the 
rear and a change in use, was approved overwhelmingly. Upon com- 
pletion, the farmhouse will provide shared living facilities for 
four elderly persons in addition to the caretaker for the Codman 
Barn complex. 

In further support of the project, $100,000 in bonding was also 
approved at the Town Meeting, which, together with a $50,000 distri- 
bution from the Codman Trust and surplus funds in the Codman Barns 
account, should provide the necessary funding based on the estimated 
total cost of $160,000. It should be pointed out during the Com- 
mission's review of the farmhouse property, it became apparent that 
the Town would be obligated to spend as much as $50,000 merely to 
preserve this Town property regardless of use. 

Preliminary approval has been received from the Historic Dis- 
trict Commission for the proposed exterior changes, and once this 
Commission has completed its review and issued a final certificate 
of appropriateness, a formal request will be made to the Board of 
Appeals for permission to establish an accessory apartment (to be 
occupied by the resident caretaker). It is our hope to complete 
the approval process and commence construction in early spring in 
order to have the property ready for occupancy during the latter 
part of 1984. 

We believe that the success of this type of living arrangement 
depends to a large extent on the development of a carefully con- 
sidered plan for its operation. Accordingly a subcommittee, which 
includes representatives from the Council on Aging, as well as pro- 
fessionals from the social welfare field, is now at work developing 
a management plan, which will govern all aspects of living in this 
congregate facility. 

The Commission spent some time in the winter of 1983 consider- 
ing the possibility of constructing a small development of afforda- 
ble housing on the 38-acre parcel of land belonging to the Sandy Pond 

106 



Trust on Sandy Pond Road. This particular parcel, which was part 
of the overall Sandy Pond Trust holdings being offered to the Town, 
was not considered "of conservation interest", since it is located 
outside the Sandy Pond watershed, unlike the balance of the land. 
Accordingly the Commission held two meetings in the neighborhood, 
and it became apparent that there was considerable opposition to 
the proposal for this type of housing, particularly in view of the 
fact that a change in zoning would be necessary to permit the density 
which would be required to make the development financially feasible. 
After careful consideration, it was unanimously agreed that it would 
be unrealistic to expect that the project could be successfully 
carried out, and accordingly the Conservation Commission was notified 
that the Housing Commission did not intend to pursue the possibility 
of acquiring this land any further. 

During the summer, the Commission devoted considerable time to 
reviewing the present zoning bylaws in order to make recommendations 
to the Planning Board on possible amendments which would facilitate 
the creation of accessory apartments, as well as potentially provide 
some additional moderate income housing as part of standard develop^ 
ments. At a meeting with the Planning Board in December, however, 
it became apparent that the "linkage" proposals required further 
study, as there are a number of legal problems to be solved. How- 
ever, there was greater unanimity about the possibility of amending 
the bylaw to make the creation of accessory apartments easier and 
less cumbersome. A subcommittee of members of the Housing Com- 
mission and the Planning Board is currently studying specific pro- 
posals to be made in this connection, and an article has been placed 
in the Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting covering certain proposed 
amendments. 

Much of the summer was spent in preparing a Housing Profile, 
including a great deal of statistical information, for publication 
in the Land Use Conference booklet: Route to Tomorrow : Challenges 
and Choices . The Land Use Conference, chaired by Susan Fargo, de- 
serves a great deal of credit for its work in organizing the Confer^ 
ence, which was held on October 29th. It was well-planned, well- 
attended, and its conclusions will be extremely helpful to the vari- 
ous Town Boards as they plan for the future. 

Although the final report of the Conference has not yet been 
printed, preliminary reports indicate that the Town believes that 
the current policy of providing housing alternatives for persons of 
moderate income should be continued. A large majority of those 
present believe that the Town f s policy on housing should continue 
to be implemented by the Housing Commission, not by an Authority. 

107 



I 1 LI 
We are gratified by this decision and will continue to work on ways 
of providing housing alternatives for our elderly and for those of 
moderate income, keeping in mind the obvious wish of the Town to 
do so as far as possible in ways that will least affect the present 
character of the Town. 



108 



LINCOLN ENERGY COMMITTEE 

Becky Bartovics, Chairman 
Samuel Donnell 
Margaret Hubbard 
Charles Resnick 
Peter Rothstein 



This year has seen the completion of the Energy Conservation Measures 
which had been budgeted at the 1982 Town Meeting. The Town employed Sergio 
Modigliani of Energy Design Team to oversee the progress of the work. J & R 
Construction, Inc. of Natick had been chosen to do the actual work. Storm 
windows or double glazing were put in place on all Town buildings; the walls 
of the Fire & Police Station were insulated and in the Smith School, banks 
of incandescent lighting were replaced with more energy efficient floure- 
scent fixtures. Throughout the process, Sergio Modigliani maintained a close 
watch on all of the work and therefore was able to keep the quality at a 
high level. Although most of the work was completed by July 30th, we will 
not have conclusive energy saving data until the end of this fiscal year, 
after one full heating season. To date, $199,676.98 of the original $210,000 
voted for energy conservation measures has been expended. The balance of 
$20,323.02 will be required for additional projects planned during fiscal 
1984. 

In addition, the committee has been involved in two other projects: 
establishing a maintenance schedule for all Town buildings, and an educa- 
tional project. We have been and will continue to work with Ernie Johnson 
and Bill Hinchey in order to bring all of the Town buildings up to recom- 
mended energy conservation standards. We have developed annual maintenance 
schedules for each building which will be closely monitored. In addition, 
we will encourage suggestions from all Town employees. 

Margaret Hubbard and Sam Donnell have been working with the school 
to make a software package available to the science and math facilities. 
This would also assist the Town in monitoring energy expenses. 

The Committee continues to see areas for future reductions in Town 
expenses. We hope that all townspeople will feel free to give us suggestions 
as to further areas into which we might look. 



109 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Robert L. DeNormandie 

Gabriel Farrell 

Stuart B. Avery, Chairman 

The completion of the new well beside Farrar Pond, including the in- 
stallation of chemical feed equipment, was the major event of 1983-84, how- 
ever, a variety of other tasks kept Town Engineer, Frank Emmons and Water 
Department employees busy. They include: 

Final grading and completion of landscaping around new reservoir; 

Annual spring and fall flushing of the system; 

Replacement of five fire hydrants; 

Replacement of approximately 350 feet of 10" water main along South 
Great Road; 

Repair of water main breaks along Route 2A, Tower Road, Farrar Road and 
at DeCordova; 

Locating, exercise and repair, if necessary, of all water main primary 
gate valves; 

Replacement of defective water meters; 

Supervision of the installation of seventeen new water services and 
the extension of water main at Brooks Hill (1150 f /8") and Smith Hill 
(900'/8"). 

All repair work was coordinated effectively with the Department of 
Public Works in order to accomplish the tasks efficiently and economically. 

The cable which will be utilized to send signals from the new well to 
the Town Barn where key indicators will be monitored and recorded has been 
hung. This project will be completed over a three year period and will tie 
each of the three water sources to the monitoring station. 

It is expected the Farrar Pond well will be operational in early Spring. 
It will provide a much-needed alternative water source and permit a great 
deal more flexibility in meeting consumption and fire protection requirements 
The well's water flow is greater than expected resulting in a significant 
increase of water pressure, particularly in the Farrar Road/Route 126 area. 
Water customers here, as well as elsewhere, in the Town were advised of this 
fact and where pressure is expected to exceed 100 pounds per square inch the 
Water Commissioners recommended installation of a pressure reducing valve 
to protect home equipment and to prevent potential flooding. 

1983/84 will also be remembered as the year Stuart Avery retired from 
the Water Board. After providing guidance and insight for twenty years 
Stuart decided to step aside. His wisdom, experience and constant good 
humor will be sorely missed. 

110 






STATISTICS AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1983 



Miles of main 
Hydrants in use 
Gates in use 
Blow-offs 
Services in use 



Beginning 
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Additions 


End of 
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44. 


49 


0.39 


48,88 


400 




4 


404 


514 




8 


522 


44 







44 


1468 




17 


1485 



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112 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 

Richard P. Carroll, Director 

The past year the department has accomplished many projects. The 
following list is that of the more significant ones. As in the past, the 
department has made every attempt to meet the needs of the Town. 

Road resurfacing and upgrading: 

1. Concord Road: 

A. The repair of existing catch basins near Baker Bridge Road and 
the installation of a new system near Hillside Road. 

B. Repair of the road base near Old Concord Road. 

C. The overlay with Type I Bituminous Concrete from South Great 
Road to Baker Bridge Road for a distance of 6200 feet. 

2. Trapelo Road: 

A. Installation of sub-drains from Tabor Hill towards Old County 
Road 400 feet. 

B. Replacement of a culvert pipe and installation of additional 
drainage structures near the Spock house. 

C. Replacement of four drainage structures at various locations. 

D. The overlay with Type I Bituminous Concrete from Minebrook Road 
to the Waltham Line for a distance of 7500 feet. 

3. Bedford Lane (Rt. 2A to Virginia Road): 

A. Repair and cut brush on shoulder of road. 

B. Overlay with Type I for a distance of 800 feet. 

Drainage Installations and repairs: 

1. Granville Road: Repair of existing basin at the intersection of 
Baker Bridge Road. 

2. Moccasin Hill: Reconstruction of one catch basin. 

3. Pierce Park: Repair head wall and dam for first pond. 
Special Projects: 

1. Pierce House: Regrade and sod section of lawn for function area. 

2. Center School: 

A. Fill and shape slope abutting soccer field. 

B. Install 140 feet of stone wall in conjunction with building 
renovations. 

3. Water Department: 

A. Remove and replace 300 feet watermain on South Great Road. 

B. Perform site work on Farrar Road Well. 

113 



4. Trees: 

A. Removed and disposed of 162 roadside trees 

B. Brush cutting on Lexington Road, Page Road, Old County Road, 
Codman Road, Sandy Pond Road and Silver Hill Road 

5. Concord Road Bike Path: 

Removal of trees and brush preliminary site work to prepare for 
path contrustion. 

The support by all given to me and my department is greatly appreciated, 



114 



PIERCE PROPERTY COMMITTEE 

Joanna Pierce Bradshaw 

Lynn Donaldson 

Margaret Flint, Sr. 

Margot Lindsay 

Aulikki Olsen 

William Shea 

John B. French, Chairman 

Dawn Murphy, Pierce House Manager 

Use of the Pierce House by town boards and committees, and for various 
private functions has continued to grow again this past year -- the latter 
increase has been reflected in rental income and a full reservations 
schedule that frequently runs into a twelve month span. Lincoln residents 
have had family celebrations here on the average of one every two or three 
weeks; non-residents have engaged the house for a like number of functions. 
(Lincoln residents should know that their reservations may be made as far 
as a year in advance; non-residents are limited to six -month reservations.) 
This rental income, supplementing that of the Pierce family trust, has 
permitted a number of repairs and improvements. 

At the end of this year Aulikki Olsen and Joanna Pierce Bradshaw, 
after several years on the Pierce Property Committee, chose to retire from 
the Committee for reasons of their own schedules. We shall miss their 
special contributions to our meetings. 

In December our resident manager, Kerrie Luce, became Mrs. Clive 
Jordan, and left with her family to live in Memphis, where her husband is 
stationed with the Navy. The Committee would like to give official recog- 
nition here of Kerrie 1 s excellent management over the past five years. The 
increased scheduling of private functions mentioned above has helped the 
financing of a number of renovations, among them energy saving and safety 
improvements, the installation of a first floor bathroom, outside step rail- 
ings, floodlights, and interior and exterior painting. And to do the house 
justice, there is a new chandelier and a piano. Kerrie has been good to 
work with, and we wish her good fortune. 

Dawn Murphy became our resident manager in January 1984. She and her 
husband, Michael, who works with the Conservation Commission, and their two 
children now occupy the apartment on the second floor of the Pierce House. 
They have long shared the Town's affection for this house and the park, and 
look forward to carrying on the program of its use. 

This coming year the Pierce Property Committee, with the advice and 
help of Max Mason and Mike Murphy, looks forward to embarking on a program 
of grounds improvement. 



115 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

Marjorie L. Holland 

H. Arnold Mac Lean 

James DeNormandie, Chairman 

Agents: Warren F. Flint 

Elizabeth J. Snelling 

We continue to improve the less developed parts of the Lexington Road 
Cemetery, not only to make them consistent with the quality of the older 
portions, but also to be prepared for the needs of our community. We have 
planted a number of rhododenrons and dogwood which will maintain and extend 
already established planting patterns. 

We believe we have in general improved the grass mowing arrangements, 
although there have been one or two instances of overmowing in natural areas 
Several large dead oaks that failed to survive the gypsy moth invasion of 
the last two years have been removed and will be replaced in most instances. 

A susbstantial portion of the roadways have been resurfaced. This pro- 
gram will continue on an annual basis until all are in satisfactory con- 
dition. Three stone headwalls at the culverts were rebuilt and an opening 
in the stone wall on the south side was made to give access to the 5 acres 
purchased a few years ago. 

During 1983, twelve lots were sold, and there were thrity-three inter- 
ments. 



116 



CELEBRATIONS COMMITTEE 

Denise Dean 

Jeffrey M. Mudge 

Karen Boyce, Co-Chairman 

Robert Dean, Co-Chairman 

The Committee's role is to coordinate all activities for three major 
holidays: Patriot's Day, Memorial Day and Independence Day. 

Patriot's Day featured the traditional rain as well as the traditional 
alarm and muster of the Lincoln Minute Men, under the direction of Guy 
Guarino. The march to Concord, the parade and the grave ceremony did take 
place in spite of the weather. 

Torrential rain reduced the turnout for the Memorial Day ceremonies 
which featured outgoing Lincoln Selectman Henry Morgan as guest speaker. 
Our thanks to Bill Whalen for his many years of contribution to these cere- 
monies and all the other participants for their efforts in making this day 
a success in spite of the downpour. 

Since the Committee's quota for precipitation had been filled on both 
Patriot's Day and Memorial Day, the glorious Fourth dawned dry and with 
searing heat for the second year in a row. The program of family oriented 
events based on the theme "The Beauty of Lincoln" included the following: 

a three mile and five mile road race, directed by Susie Hunter which, 
considering the heat was completed by a surprisingly large number of con- 
testants, 

a Children's Parade marshaled by John and Pat Hatsopoulos which stepped 
off from Upland Field Road, 

the tolling of church bells from the First Parish Church in Lincoln to 
announce the beginning of the main parade. This year our Grand Marshals were 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Morgan and they led our parade in grand style riding down 
Lincoln Road in a horse drawn surrey. Cathy and Bob Long were parade marshals 
and Clare and Bob Pinto were assistant parade marshals, we can't thank them 
enough. 

After the awards ceremony, rides on Arthur Fiedler's antique fire truck, 
courtesy of the Lincoln Review, entertainment and a free swim at the Codman 
Pool were enjoyed by a very large number of townspeople. In spite of the 
weather a hardy group of tennis enthusiasts participated in the tennis round 
robin. 

As usual, the Lincoln Grange graciously and good humoredly prepared 
food and drink to help maintain the energy of the townspeople in the exhaust- 
ing heat. For many years they have worked very hard to make the Fourth of 
July in Lincoln a wonderful day and huge success. We want to thank the Grange 
for all their help, we certainly couldn't have done it without them. 



117 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

John W. Carman 
Robert A. Cunningham 
Elizabeth J. Donaldson 
Colin Smith 
Paul E. Marsh, Chairman 

The Historical Commission has been active preparing an application 
to nominate the Old Center portion of the Historic District for listing 
in the National Register of Historic places. By Town Meeting, the paper- 
work will be done and forwarded to the Massachusetts Historical Commission 
for approval and transmittal to Washington. Before the listing, each 
property owner in the District will be notified individually to say 
whether he wants his property included or not. When this process is 
complete, two of the three areas in the Lincoln Historic District will 
have been listed in the National Register since the Codman property 
already is. 

Work has also gone forward on organizing the archives in the Library. 
Microfilm tapes of facsimiles of all US Census reports on Lincoln from 
1790 to 1920 have been added to the collection, all of which is now 
catalogued and filed. Michael Price, the Reference Librarian, has been 
named Curator of the Archives. 



118 



HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 

F. Douglas Adams 

Basil Chigas 

Robert A. Cunningham 

Elizabeth C. Donaldson 

Paul Marsh 

Colin L.M. Smith 

John W. Carman, Chairman 

Kenneth Hurd, Alternate 
Kim Kassner, Alternate 

After appointment to the Board of Assessors, Paul Marsh resigned as 
Chairman and John W. Carman, Vice Chairman, was elected Chairman. 
Operating Rules and Regulations covering submission of applications for 
public hearings and the ensuing Certificate of Appropriateness were 
adopted. 

The Commission held six public hearings on applications for exterior 
modifications to structures within Historic Districts. Four resulted in 
issuance of Certificates of Appropriateness and one will be resubmitted. 
The Codman Farmhouse architectural renderings were considered on a preliminary 
basis with another public hearing needed when final plans are completed. 

There have been preliminary discussions of the plans for reconstruction 
of Bedford Road and the question of putting electric power lines underground 
in the Center Historic District. 



119 



CODMAN COMMUNITY FARMS, INC. 

Suze Craig 

Warren Flint, Jr. 

Daniel Hart 

David M. Hill, Vice President 

Margot Maddock 

Margaret Marsh 

Carolyn Mover 

Roy M. Raja, Treasurer 

Clifford Rice, Clerk 

F. John Solman 

Enid Winchell 

Louise W. Davy, President 

Stanley D. White, Farmer/Manager 

Codman Community Farms began the 1983 growing season with the arrival 
of Farm Manager, Stan White, in later April. Due to rain, Spring plantings 
were delayed, allowing time for machinery repairs. However, May's 14 inches 
of rain helped the growing season dramatically. 

A relatively small crew of seasonal workers were hired at the end of 
May for the growing season. This year's emphasis was on "low labor" projects 
including hay, livestock, and limited vegetables (strawberries, squash, 
raspberries, and sweet corn). The community garden plots were nearly full 
and the farm expanded its community service of custom work. 

Again hay was the largest crop. We harvested over 8,000 bales grown 
in Lincoln. The quality of hay was excellent, improving CCF's reputation 
for quality hay. A new baler has improved our efficiency - not to mention 
the morale of staff. Far Meadow was improved into a Timothy/Alfalfa hayfield 
and Boyce field renovations were initiated, both with the financial help of 
the USDA Soil Conservation Service. 

The livestock projects of pork and lamb were again successful, all of 
which were at prime weight by market time. 

CCF this year continued to expand its service to the community and to 
meet its goal of keeping and returning Lincoln agricultural land productive 
through custom work. The use of our equipment and staff during slack times 
has allowed us to improve or return to productivity 100 acres in Lincoln. 

The agricultural season wound down with the annual CCF Harvest Fair in 
September. Due to rain, the fair was postponed to Sunday, yet still turned 
out to be most successful. 

In 1983, CCF continued to meet its goal of bringing people together 
from all walks of life by promoting agriculture in the community and helping 
to preserve Lincoln's agricultural land and heritage. A most successful 
year, with everyone reaping the rewards and benefits that a community farm 
can offer. 



120 



CODMAN COMMUNITY FARMS, INC. 
Balance Sheet 
November 30, 1983 and 1982 
Assets 

1983 



Current assets: 
Cash 

Accounts Receivable 
Inventory 

Total current assets 

Property and equipment, at cost 
Structures 

Motor vehicles and wagons 
Farm Implements 

Less accumulated depreciation 

Net property and equipment 



Liabilities and Fund Balances 



Current Liabilities: 
Accounts payable 
Accrued expenses 

Total Liabilities 

Fund balances: 

Property and equipment fund 
Restricted fund 
Unrestricted fund 

Total fund balances 



$ 950 

575 

1,525 



21,772 

94 

24,373 

46,239 

$47,764 



1982 



$13,525 


$13,232 


5,177 


3,102 


16,290 


7,631 


34,992 


23,965 


1,619 


1,651 


7,082 


7,570 


23,311 


19,346 


32,012 


28,567 


19,240 


18,496 


12,772 


10,071 


$47,764 


$34,036 



$ 1,948 
500 

2,448 



10,071 

94 

21,423 

31,588 

$34,036 



121 



CODMAN COMMUNITY FARMS, INC. 

Statement of Revenues, Expenses and Changes in Fund Balances 
Years ended November 30, 1983 and 1982 



1983 



1982 



Operating revenues: 
Sales: 
Hay 

Vegetable crops 
Livestock 
Custom work 

Purchased items resold 
Total sales 

Dues 

Garden Plot fees 

Fair 

U.S.D.A. cost sharing 

Interest 

Total operating revenues 

Operating expenses: 

Labor and related costs 

Seed and livestock 

Fertilzer and lime 

Repairs 

Depreciation 

Feed 

Rentals 

Supplies 

Fuel costs 

Insurance, taxes and fees 

Freight and utilities 

Legal and accounting 

Office supplies and expense 

Total operating expenses 

Operating income (loss) 

Non-operating revenue (expenses) : 
Unrestricted gift 
Restricted gift -equipment funds 
Gain on sale of equipment 

Net non-operating revenues 

Excess revenues 
Fund balances at beginning of year 
Fund balances at end of year 



$20,932 


$14,978 


589 


4,017 


4,151 


4,034 


7,009 


5,980 


2,765 


585 


35,446 


29,594 


4,245 


4,190 


885 


1,160 


4,242 


4,047 


759 


288 


985 


1,277 



46,562 



43,231 
3,331 



11,320 
14,651 

31,588 

$46,239 



40,556 



2,144 


21,027 


779 


3,268 


9,134 


3,318 


4,413 


3,486 


5,062 


3,423 


3,352 


2,669 


1,703 


1,591 


1,159 


1,049 


2,220 


2,566 


560 


591 


820 


595 


677 


608 


1,208 


830 



45,021 
(4,465) 



..-, 


2,850 


9,000 


- 


2,320 


1,800 



4,650 
185 

31,403 

$31,588 



122 



CABLE TELEVISION ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Jack K. Carver 

Gabrielle Farrell 

Jim Flynn 

Josephine K. Gump 

Stephen R. Low, Chairman 

John A. Klobuchar 

Nathan F. Parke 

James L. Pettee 

Joseph Rosen 

Michael Simon 

Robert G. Wolf, Vice-Chairman 



In 1983, Lincoln's Selectmen voted to begin the cable television 
licensing process. The Cable Television Advisory Committee was appointed 
to assist in the study of cable television issues, the writing of an 
issuing authority report (a document which specifies Lincoln's system 
requirements), evaluation of applications, and other matters related to 
licensing. The actual licensing decision rests, however, with the 
Selectmen. 

Three companies have applied for a cable television license in 
Lincoln. Adams-Russell, headquartered in Waltham, operates (or will soon 
operate) systems in nearby towns, including Lexington, Bedford and 
Sudbury. They propose to serve us from their headend in Maynard. 

New Communications Corporation, headquartered in Cambridge, is an 
affiliate of Kalba Bowen Associates, a firm which consults to 
municipalities and companies on matters involving cable television. New 
Communications Corporation does not presently operate any cable systems, 
but they have applied for licenses in Wayland and Concord. Lincoln would 
be served from a headend whose location has not yet been identified. 

West Surburan Tele-Communications, Inc. is an affiliate of Denver- 
based Tele-Communications, Inc. (TCI), the firm recently awarded the 
franchise in Waltham. That headend would be used to serve Lincoln. 

The committee is presently drafting an issuing authority report which 
will be presented to the Selectmen in early 1984. Following the 
Selectmen's review and approval, the report will be forwarded to each 
applicant. They will then have an opportunity to amend their proposals. 
Following analysis of the amendments and a public hearing, the Selectmen 
can deny all applications or they can award a license to one of the 
applicants. Selection of a licensee will then require negotiation of a 
final license before construction could begin. 

Among the most important findings from its investigation of cable 
television is that a combination of federal and state regulations preclude 
the town from regulating either rates or programming. 



123 



The Committee meets on most Thursday nights in the Town Offices 
building and appreciates public attendance at its meetings. On December 
1, 1983, the committee conducted a special meeting for the purpose of 
presenting a status report to the public, for answering questions, and for 
receiving feedback. Appended to this report is the information handout 
prepared for the December 1 discussion. 

Finally, to answer the question most frequently asked of committee 
members, cable television service could be available to Lincoln 
subscribers in 1985 if the licensing process proceeds at the current pace. 



WHAT IS CABLE TELEVISION? 
INFORMATION FOR LINCOLN RESIDENTS 

What is cable television? 

Cable t.v. is a network of coaxial cables and related electronic 
equipment permitting distribution of a large number of television channels 
from a central source to individual homes. 

How does cable television differ from broadcast television? 

The most obvious difference is the manner in which signals are trans- 
mitted to the home viewer. Cable television transmits signals via coaxial 
cables. Broadcast television transmits signals over the air. 

How is the cable system constructed? 

A cable network is designed and constructed to be placed along with 
other utility lines on existing poles or underground to form a 
distribution system very similar to that of a telephone network. 

A main cable would pass through your neighborhood. If existing 
utility lines are strung above ground, so would the cable. If the utility 
lines are underground, the cable would be underground also. 

From this cable, a smaller line (called a house, drop) would be 
connected to your television set. A converter, which sits on top of your 
television set, will allow you to select channels. The converter is 
usually included with the cable subscription at no additional cost. 

How does one subscribe to cable television? 

By calling or writing the cable firm awarded the franchise in your 
community. You may then request a subscription form and brochure 
outlining available programming services or you may order the service 
directly. Subscribers pay an installation fee and are billed monthly. 

Must I_ subscribe for a - ainimum time period? 

No. Most cable -companies bill by the month. You may discontinue at 
any time. 

124 



Is cable voluntary? 

Absolutely. Cable will not interfere with existing broadcast 
televison reception. The choice to subscribe or not is yours. 

Will everyone in Lincoln be able to get cable? 

Everyone in Lincoln will be able to get cable, but it is possible 
that some households will have to pay more for cable services than others. 
Each franchise applicant will address this issue in the application 
process and the issue will be resolved through negotiation. 

What if there are service problems once it is installed? 

Subscribers with reception problems will contact the cable company. 
Sometimes you will be able to resolve the problem over the phone; if not, 
a cable technician will make a service call to determine where the problem 
is. Most service calls are free. 

What procedure will Lincoln follow to grant a. franchise? 

The state Cable Televison Commission (CATV) has established rules and 
regulations pertaining to the cable television franchise process. Lincoln 
has taken the initial step of requesting bids from prospective cable 
companies. 

These intial proposals were submitted by Adams-Russell, 
Telecommunications, Inc. and New Communications Corp. in August, 1983. 
the Lincoln CATV Committee has studied the proposals, and is preparing a 
set of bid specifications detailing the form and content for the final 
proposals. After the final proposals are submitted, the Committee will 
evaluate and compare them and their respective companies. After the 
evaluation process, it will recommend a bidder to the Selectmen. 

What are the selection criteria? 

In addition to determining how reasonable the proposals are, the 
Committee will also investigate each applicant's financial capability, 
technical expertise, operating experience, business conduct in other 
municipalities, and degree of local commitment and responsibiltiy. 

Who makes the final decision? 

The Board of Selectmen choose the winning bidder, negotiate the final 
terms of the contract, and pass an ordinance granting the franchise. 

Must Lincoln grant a. franchise? 

Lincoln is under no obligation to grant a franchise and may stop the 
proceedings at any time. By state statute, though, it must inform the 
prospective bidders why it stopped the process. 



125 



What programming will be available? 

Programming is generally available in several tiers (levels). The 
lowest tier would include the existing local t.v. stations, community 
information and public access channels. 

Optional service will be offered for an additional fee. Such 
programming includes recent movies, sporting events, and entertainment 
specials. Some may come as a package; that is, you must buy the entire 
package in order to get a particular program in that package. Pay-per- 
view may also be offered. 

Pay-per-view permits you to view selected movies, sports and 
entertainment events, etc., on a selective basis. You'll then be billed 
for the programs you watched. 

How is the programming obtained by the cable company? 

The cable company may use a satellite dish, low-power microwave 
receivers, or trunk cables to obtain programming. Placement of towers or 
dishes will be made in accordance with existing statutes. With studio 
facilities in Lincoln, the system could also carry locally produced shows. 

What other services are available over cable television? 

Because of cable's capacity to carry a large amount of information to 
and from each home, there are many possibilities for additional service. 
Most such services are technologically possible today, but are not yet 
economically feasible. Additional services currently available include 
home security alarm systems and institutional networks capable of 
connecting hospitals, libaries, schools and other institutions to provide 
a low-cost means of communications. 

Will we share the system with other towns? 

Lincoln may or may not share the system with surrounding towns, 
depending on who holds the franchise. The technology can differ from 
system to system, so interconnecting may be technically difficult. The 
CATV Committee has been exploring the possiblities of interconnects with 
Lincoln-Sudbuy Regional High School, Hinuteman,and the school system at 
Hanscom. 

Because the licensing process occurs at the local level, establishing 
a regional cable district would require special legislation and does not 
seem likely to take place. 

How would Lincoln benefit by hav ing cable? 

Cable immediately would offer an expanded range of programming. In 
addition, the system would offer opportunities for educational use not 
currently available. It could also provide the capability for security 
and medical alert systems. Finally, an interactive or two-way cable 
system (the type presently being installed) could provide the capability 
for banking, shopping, making reservations, etc. from the comfort of 
one 's home. 

126 



Will othe r technologies make cable obsolete? 

Other technologies, like fiber optics and direct broadcast satellite, 
may eventually be able to deliver television programming and other 
services to homes. But most cities and towns in the U.S. are using cable 
technology now, and a wide and valuable range of national and local 
services are currently available for cable that are not available for 
other technologies. 

How is the public protected from the showing of pornography? 

A common worry is porgnography. The Federal Communications 
Commission prohibits the showing of anything obscene, which is a difficult 
term to define. Also, prohibition against obscenity is the only standard 
that a local government can legally impose. But attempting to define 
obscenity for the CATV franchise could be a divisive undertaking, which 
invariably turns on constitutional grounds. 

By law, cable companies are prohibited from showing X-rated movies or 
any other material of a similar nature. Cable operators do offer R-rated 
movies and other materials which contain a higher level of sexuality, 
profanity or violence than what is commonly shown on broadcast stations. 
This type of controversial programming is only available on premium 
channels which subscribers will not receive unless they agree to pay an 
extra seven to ten dollars per month per channel. 

As a protection for concerned parents, all cable companies offer 
lock-out devices which prevent children from viewing some or all of the 
cable channels when parental supervision is unavailable. These devices 
either operate by a key lock or an electronic combination which parents 
can program into the converter box that sits on top of their t.v. set. 
Lock-out devices will be available for little or no cost to any subscriber 
who requests one. 

Who monitors the system after it is operating? 

The winning bidder will specify a performance level in its proposal 
and will most likely monitor system performance periodically. After all, 
if residents aren't happy with the quality, they won't subscribe. 

In addition, most municipalities appoint a committee or board to 
oversee the cable system's performance, programming, etc. The town awards 
the license on the basis of operating expectations and can revoke the 
license for failure to meet expected service levels. At the same time, it 
is important to recognize that under existing state and federal statutes, 
the town has little control over programming and/or fees once a license 
has been awarded. 



127 



UNDERGROUND WIRING COMMITTEE 

John H. Boyer 
Martha DeNormandie 
Butch Donaldson 
Gabe Farrell, Chairman 
Rudolph Litte 
Peter Von Merten 

This committee was created by action of the 1983 Town Meeting which 
authorized our investigation of the feasibility of placing utility wires 
underground throughout the Town for safety and aesthetic considerations. 

The committee was saddened and handicapped by the untimely death of 
Dr. Donaldson. The committee had the pleasure of Dr. Donaldson's 
attendance at the first meeting. It was immediately obvious at that 
meeting that Dr. Donaldson would be a strong and effective contributor to 
the committee's projected efforts. 

It quickly became evident that the task of placing utility wires 
underground throughout the Town would be expensive and full of problems 
that would be difficult to solve. There was, it might be added, an 
urgency to determine answers to numerous questions in view of the pending 
repaying/ reconstruct ion of Bedford Road and the belief that if anything 
can be done in burying wires, provisions should be made during the road 
construction particularly if the Town decided in favor of the original 
motion which was only for limited underground ing at the Center. 

The Boston Edison Company was cooperative when requested to submit 
estimates for four different proposals which were: first, to reroute the 
wires up Library Lane; second, to do the work in the immediate vicinity of 
the center; third, to place the utility wires underground from the Center 
to Reservoir Road; fourth, to place the wires of the entire Town 
underground. The representative from Boston Edison pointed out that they 
would not carry any wire in off the road more than two feet and that 
bringing in the wire from the edge of the street to a house would have to 
be done by a prive electrical contractor. He also stated that Edison 
prefers overhead wiring because maintenance is so much easier. At this 
time the telephone company's cost of putting their wires underground is 
not available. 

The Cable T.V. Advisory Committee will require the licensee to place 
wires underground where other utilities are underground and to move their 
cable underground if other utilities are moved. 

The impact on street lighting with underground wiring is not clear at 
this time. 

In summary, it can be predicted that the cost of putting all the 
utility wiring underground would be extremely expensive. It does seem 
reasonable, however, to pursue the first two proposals presented by the 
Edison Company to the Town and mentioned above. 



128 



WINTER STREET TASK FORCE 

Terry Fenton 

John Goodrich 

John Hammond 

Margot Lindsay, Chairman 

James White 

Agnes Wiggin 

Richard Wiggin 



The Winter Street Task Force was created in 1982 by the Selectmen and 
the Planning Board in response to the proposed office park development of 
the Kennedy pig farm on Winter Street in Waltham. Its mission is to study 
and help to alleviate the impact of the development on Lincoln. Since 
that time, the developer has progressed with plans and is now scheduled to 
break ground in the spring of 1984. The development will be approximately 
the size of the Burlington Mall and draw 5,000 daily. 

The growth of commuter traffic through Town will continue at an 
accelerated pace as development in Waltham from this and other projects 
moves forward. If Lincoln becomes overrun with traffic, much of the 
ambience which the Town has worked so hard to preserve with its careful 
land use planning will be lost. Traffic will be one of the Town's major 
concerns for, the rest of the century. 

With the assistance of many interested townspeople, the Task Force 
has spent considerable effort reviewing the proposed development, 
assessing its real impact on the Town, and exploring suitable solutions. 

A major traffic study, probably the most comprehensive such study by 
any group to date, was completed with the assistance of a consulting 
traffic engineer, John Caswell's computer model, and more than one-hundred 
Town volunteers collecting data. The study examined traffic volumes, 
turning data at key intersections, origins and destinations, and routing 
information to determine traffic patterns and traffic growth from the 
development. Its findings include: 

1. The principal impact on Lincoln will be a significant increase 
in traffic from people going to and from the development. 
Virtually all of this traffic will be from sources outside of 
Lincoln; Lincoln will be used as a short cut to/from the west 
and north. 

2. This increase in traffic is a major townwide problem, not just a 
local one. Significant increases will occur on Trapelo, 
Bedford, Sandy Pond, and Baker Bridge Roads, as well as Winter 
Street and Old County Road. 

3. Evening rush-hour traffic through Lincoln Center will exceed the 
safe carrying capacity of the "five corners" intersection near 
the library. 



129 



4. Additional development potential exists that could generate 
several times more traffic than this. There are 287 developable 
acres, already commercially zoned, in that immediate section of 
Waltham. Several additional development proposals have already 
been advanced. 

5. The most effective means of diverting this traffic from narrow 
Lincoln streets onto the major state roads (Routes 2 and 128) is 
to discontinue Winter Street near the Lincoln/Waltham boundary. 

In addition to the traffic study, the Task Force has initiated a 
number of steps to deal with this problem: 

1. Discussions have been held with the developer and with several 
governmental bodies, including Waltham, and efforts have been 
made to influence the state regulatory processes. So far, this 
has not produced results. 

2. The 1983 Town Meeting approved a warrant article authorizing the 
Selectmen to begin proceedings to close Winter Street. 

For the specific challenge created by the development in 
Waltham, the traffic studies have shown conclusively that 
closing Winter Street not only virtually eliminates this 
pressure point, but, if it were in place today, would reduce 
traffic on many streets to well below their current levels. 
Therefore, the Task Force has adopted the closing of Winter 
Street as its principal objective. 

Because Winter Street is part of the county layout, the 
authority to discontinue it rests with the County 
Commissioners. Since the road connects two towns, both towns 
and other constituencies will be heard in this complex legal and 
political process. 

3. At the Task Force's suggestion, the Town Historical Commission 
has alerted the Massachusetts Historical Commission to the 
impact of the traffic on the Lincoln Center Historical District. 
They are jointly exploring the applicability of a new statute 
which may help to mitigate traffic impacts. 

4. The Task Force continues to research possible legal challenges 
to the development if mitigation of traffic is not achieved. 

The Selectmen and Planning Board have proposed the formalization of a 
master Traffic Plan calling for steps to reroute commuter through-traffic 
onto the major state routes and off of the narrow residential streets. 
This should be a major priority throughout the Town. 

The Task Force appreciates the support of the many citizens who 
continue to give time and/or money to this important townwide effort. 



130 



Schools, Library and Recreation 



TRUSTEES OF THE LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Carolyn Birmingham 
Eleanor Fitzgerald 
Douglas Harding 
Mary Newman 
Robert Shenton 
David Ford, Chairman 





Term 


Expires 


School Committee Appointee 




1985 


Elected 




1986 


Sel f -perpetuat ing 






Self -perpetuating 






Selectmen Appointee 




1984 


Self -perpetuat ing 







OVERVIEW 

On the eve of its centennial year the Lincoln Public Library finds 
itself .at an interesting and challenging point in its history. 

During the past year it can take pride in the fact that the traditional 
goals of a library have been satisfied -- often with distinction. Total 
circulation (90,770) increased 4.5% over the previous year. Approximately 
1,000 more books were added to the collection, which now totals 58,618. 
Despite a critical shortage of space, room was somehow found to house these 
books, and to carry on a varied series of programs and activities. A large 
print collection was established. Back issues of the Lincoln Edition of the 
Concord Journal have now been committed to microfilm. The record collection 
continues to grow. 

In short, this year has been a continuation of a general trend in Lincoln 
that has been going on for the past twenty years -- and which has produced 
a library capable of dealing with a very sophisticated and literate audience. 

MINUTEMAN LIBRARY NETWORK 

The challenge facing the Library in the future is to maintain the level 
of quality it now enjoys -- and to improve upon it. One way to do this is 
by means of harnessing the computer. The Trustees and the Librarian have 
been active during the past year in investigating the benefits of Lincoln's 
participation in a shared automation system. As a result of those discussions, 
the Lincoln Library played a major role in the formation of the Minuteman 
Library Network, a group of libraries from fourteen area towns. This group 
was awarded a federal grant of $440,000, which will be used to purchase the 
central computer, located at the Framingham Public Library, one of the members 
of the consortium. 



We are enthusiastic about this development for a number of reasons. 
Briefly, joining the consortium will mean: 

1) expanding our collection of 58,618 books to over 2 million (we will 
have access within one or two day's time to anything available in the 
collections of all the libraries in the consortium); 

131 



2) increased efficiency of book ordering procedures and bookkeeping 
for our own collection; 

3) possible linkage eventually with the schools; and 

4) a tie-in with home computers in the not -so-distant future. 

No aspect of modern times has seemed any more ready-made for computers 
than the handling of library records and information. The cost of storing 
those records has plummeted and, with the help of the federal grant, there 
has never been a more cost-effective time to take advantage of this new 
technology. It is hoped that the members of the Lincoln community will view 
the Library's participation in the Minuteman Library Network with all the 
enthusiasm this development deserves. 

CENTENNIAL 

In the fall of this year, the Library will celebrate the 100th anniversar) 
of its founding. A committee has been formed, and plans made for centennial 
activities. They include: a written history of the Library (an effort 
coordinated by the Lincoln Historical Soceity) , a Centennial Ball, dramatic 
events, a membership drive for the Friends, and the establishment of a capital 
development fund. It is intended that the centennial be a festive, meaningful 
event -- well-publicized, well-attended, and generously supported. 

STAFF 

Children's Librarian Heddie Kent retired in the fall; this year also 
saw her complete twenty-five years of service to the Library and to the 
children of Lincoln. This report cannot adequately express the debt we owe 
this woman for her many years of effective service. Some of the feelings 
of gratitude implied here were expressed at a farewell party organized by 
Ellen Sisco and held at the Library on May 1st. A town-wide gathering was 
also organized by the Friends of the Library; it was held at the Pierce 
House on June 1st. 

Amy Gavalis was hired to replace Heddie Kent. Amy comes from the 
Swampscott Public Library, where she was Children's Librarian for five years 
prior to her coming to Lincoln. Also joining the staff was Michael Price, 
who comes to us from the library at the New England Historic Geneological 
Society via the Iredell County Library in Statesvil-le, North Carolina. 
Michael is principally our Reference Librarian, with additional responsibil- 
ities for our historical archives and our on-line data base searching activi- 
ties. Naomi Luft, whose part-time service to the Library spans ten years, 
worked part of this year as temporary replacement for Cathy Brannen, Assistant 
Children's Librarian, who was on maternity leave. 

PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 

The popular Wednesday Morning at the Library program, now in its eleventh 
year, continues under the able guidance and ever fresh outlook of Ellen 
Cannon and Ethel Mackenzie. That these two women consistently tap the 
Lincoln community for imaginative programs is a tribute to their skills and 
those of the participants. Ellen Sisco 's Thursday Evening Film programs 
continue to satisfy the public need for high-quality films. The Friday 

132 



Morning Book Club remains a forum for meetings at which a broad array of 
books and subjects is discussed. The Council on Aging again this year 
scheduled several programs in cooperation with the Library. 

In addition to established programs, the Library saw the introduction 
of several new and special programs. In November the Friends of the Library 
sponsored Lincoln Artists' Night, a memorable event which introduced resident 
artists and their works to each other and to the community. Bill Poisson 
organized two evenings of "Classic Jazz at the Library", with sequences of 
taped music interspersed with narration by Bill. Michael Price, with expert 
technical assistance from Janice Bower, organized a seminar explaining a 
new service offered by the Library: on-line data base searching by means 
of the Library DECmate computer. 

The Children's Room was in transition during much of 1983, but the 
staff managed to carry on with its extensive children's programming nonethe- 
less. We continued our toddler program for parents and two-year-olds, our 
pre-school story hours, after- school programs, films, craft programs, and 
the latest edition of Mrs. Kent's library plays, "Signor Padrone", produced 
in February in the Bemis Hall. 

It should be noted that, in addition to Library-sponsored events, the 
Library welcomes other local groups who have a need to use our facility 
for meetings. Last year the organizations availing themselves of this 
opportunity included: the Lincoln Historical Society, the Garden Club, the 
League of Women Voters, the Stamp Club, and the newly-formed Entrepreneurs 
Group . 

FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY 

The Friends are flourishing. Under the leadership of Silke Moss they are 
a veritable wellspring of vitality and fruitful ideas. In addition to the 
Spring Book Sale, which netted $930, they sponsored the on-going book sale 
in the Library foyer. Other events sponsored by the Friends were (in random 
order): the purchase of a new rug for the Memorial Room and a year's worth 
of passes for library patrons to the Museum of Science, an exhibit of Robert 
Indiana's paintings, a talk by Anne Bernays at the annual meeting on May 18th, 
the establishment of a Friends of the Library office in Bemis Hall, Lincoln 
Artists' Night, Memorial Day support and refreshments, Mrs. Kent's retirement 
party at the Pierce House, the traditional Easter Egg Hunt on the Library 
lawn in the spring, and able assistance with the Library float in the 4th 
of July parade. 

An upcoming task for which the Friends have volunteered is to help the 
Library convert its book records to computer format for use in the Minuteman 
Library Network. 

It is obvious from such an array that the Friends are indeed an active 
group ! 

BUILDING AND GROUNDS 

A number of physical changes were made to the Library during the year, 
i none of them by any means radical, but all of them certainly worth noting. 
In answer to the need to save energy, the north wall was reconstructed. 

133 



Most of the floor-to-ceiling glass was replaced by solid wall construction. 
This also allowed for a modest increase in shelf space within the building. 
On the advice of the Town Building Inspector, and with the use of funds de- 
voted to the repair of town buildings, the sills on that part of the building 
around the main entrance were replaced. Money from the Tarbell endowment fun 
was used to replace and upgrade the bookshelves in the Tarbell Room. The 
Memorial Room, which had been used only for storage, was renovated and out- 
fitted at very little cost, and now serves as an office for the Head Libraria 

As a part of our energy program, the Library received a contribution of 
extensive consulting and planning services from George G. Tarbell, III, 
which resulted in the installation of a new energy -efficient burner, a dona- 
tion of the H. B. Knowles Co. The Library wishes to thank both parties for 
their generosity and expertise. 

As in the past, we thank with fondness Francis Gleason for his continu- 
ing concern and help with the Library shrubs and grounds. 

GIFTS 

It is a pleasure to acknowledge the many gifts of books, money, time and 
services that the Library has received during the year. Robert and Mary 
Newman established a fund for the purchase of large print books. The 
Library received donations from William T. and Mary H. Payne (matched by 
the Digital Equipment Corporation) for general use, and from the Lincoln 
Historical Society and the Concord Journal to help with the cost of micro- 
filming back issues of the Lincoln Edition. For the second year in a row 
the Library was the recipient of a generous gift from John and Peg Carman 
to the John W. and Eleanor Tarbell Carman Fund; this gift was matched by the 
Mobil Oil Corporation. Antoher generous donation was received from the 
estate of Ann S. M. Banks. 

We received numerous gifts of books, records and tapes, and we are most 
grateful for all of them (a list of donors follows this report) . Help from 
our many volunteers, pages, and pages-in-training is also greatly appreciated 
throughout the year. 

EXHIBITS 

DeNormandie Room: Robert Indiana - Prints from a traveling exhibition; 
Ted Gartland - Photographs of Faces; Marian Cook.- Sea Fantasy; Stephanie 
Komfeld- Applique and Crocheted Wall Hangings; Hilary French - Color Photo- 
graphs; Kaleidoscope of Lincoln Artists; Ruth Williams - Bermuda Photo- 
graphs . 






134 



January. 12 

February 9 

March 9 

April 13 
May 11 
October 12 
November 9 



WEDNESDAY MORNING AT THE LIBRARY 
1983 

"Computers and Modern Life" A panel discussion, with Mike 
Harvey, Henry Olds, Gail Salvini; Jay Daly, moderator. 

"Reporting the News In Print and On Television" with Ben and 
Martha Bradlee. 

"What Happened to the Controversy About Weather Modification?" 
with Robert M. Cunningham. 

"In the Beginning" with Pat Asaff. 

"Boston By Foot" with Polly Flansburgh. 

"Russia - One Trip Is Not Enough" with Martha and Jim DeNormandie 

"What's It All About, Alfie?" with Bert Kessel. 

STAFF - 1983 



Jay Daly 
Ellen Sisco 
Heddie Kent 
Amy Gavalis 
Marjorie Snyder 
Michael Price 
Catherine Brannen 
Mary Irwin 
Phyllis MacFarland 
Audrey Dedinsky 
Nancy Gregory 
Pete Heijn 
Mae Dolinger 
Naomi Luft 
John Bottino 
Robert Bottino 



Monday, Wednesday, Thursday 

Tuesday, Friday 

Saturday 



Librarian 

Assistant Librarian 

Children's Librarian 1958-1983 retired 

Children's Librarian 9/83 

Technical Services Librarian 

Reference Librarian 

Assistant Children's Librarian 

Library Technician 

Senior Library Assistant/Bookkeeper 

Clerk Typist 

Circulation Assistant 

Circulation Assistant 

Children's Room Aide 

Children's Room Assistant 

Custodian 

Custodian 

HOURS - 1983 

9 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. 

9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

10 a.m. to 5 p.m. except during July and 

August - closed 



135 



Library Pages 1983 



Lucy Birkett 
Stephen Birmingham 
Kathie Brobeck 
Susanna Collins 
Paul Fitzgerald 
Gaelen Green 
Laura Heijn 
Hans Hollister 
Rachel Keevil 
Shauna Lo 

Library Volunteers 1983 

Kathie Brobeck 
Bobby Carrol 
Ole Craig 
Virginia Dillman 
Mary Dominicella 
Ellie Donaldson 
Cara Green 
Ricky Guthke 
Mary Ann Hales 
Sontine Kalba 
Tina Kao 
Faith Keevil 



Anne Meriam 
Caroline Murphy 
Shasha Nabih 
Diana Ryan 
Elisa Sartori 
Kay Kay Smith 
Henry Thomas 
Betsy Tong 
Anne Touborg 
Richard Wyner 



Chris Kennedy 
Dorli Littinger 
Rebecca Loud 
Ellen McCarthy 
Suzanne McKay 
Dorothea Murphy 
Anne Norton 
Julie O'Laughlin 
Isabel Peirce 
Bill Poisson 
Craig Smith 
Cheryl Van Horn 



The Library is grateful to the many people who gave books and records to 
support the collection during the year. They include: 



Gordon Baird 

Mr. £ Mrs. Roger Baldwin 

Bruce Bare 

Sally Bobbitt 

Sandra Bradley-Clark 

Paul Brooks 

Martin Buerger 

Mr. § Mrs. Burnham 

Cannon Family 

Gabrielle Coignet 

Lucy Cole 

Peter Conrad 

Betty Cope 

Russ Craig 

Pat and Stephen Crandall 

Kits Culver 

Peter Cutler 

Alexandra Dane 

Eugene Darling 

Martha DeNormandie 

Emy Dickey 

Thomas Dunn 

Ross Finney 

Joseph Finsmith 



Eleanor Fitzgerald 

Al Fullerton 

Francis Gleason 

Rick Goddard 

Bea Grim 

Mary Ann Hales 

Mr. § Mrs. Adler Hanson 

Hapgood Family 

Roger £ Evelyn Harris 

Lynn Harvey 

Elaine Hawkes 

Mr. § Mrs. H. Healey 

Pete Heijn 

Dr. Charles Hersch 

Florence Hollingsworth 

Polly Jackson 

Ann Janes 

Morley John 

Mrs. Kenneth Johnson 

Heddie Kent 

Mrs. William King 

Klobuchar Family 

Mrs. Kruse 

Kubik Estate 



136 



Mr. § Mrs. Thomas Leggat 

Rob Loud 

Dr. Ludwig Luft 

Richard Merian 

Minute Men of Lincoln 

Leonard Moss 

Mr. Morency 

Mrs. Robert Mueller 

Ruth Murphy 

Adeline Naiman 

Mary Newman 

Kenneth 01 sen 

Mrs. Patrick O'Toole 

Kathy Parker 

Jim Pastoriza 

Stephen Proskaur 

Roy Raja 

Mr. Resnick 

Natalie Rudin 

Henry Rugo 



Charles § Anne Satterfield 

Mr. § Mrs. Clement Sawtell 

Mr. £ Mrs. William Schwann 

Mrs. Robert Segal 

Joan Shambaugh 

Ellen Sisco 

Sumner Smith 

Peggy Stathos 

Margaret Sykes 

Ed Taylor 

Mr. § Mrs. Fred Taylor 

Anne Permain Thomson 

Williard Traub 

Ted Tucker 

Mrs. Tunnel 1 

Winthrop Walker 

Cody Webb 

Dick Wengren 

Bella Wheeler 

Ross Whitman 

Ed Williams 



Magazine Gift subscriptions were received from the following people: 



Mrs. L. B. Anderson 

Dr. Balogh 

Book Affair, Inc. 

Dr. Buerger 

Betty Cope 

Ruth Hapgood 



Mike Harvey 
Myer Kolodny 
Dr. Ludwig Luft 
Murv Moore 
Roy Raja 
Bella Wheeler 



The Library received generous gifts last year from the following people and 
others : 

The estate of Ann S. M. Banks 

John and Eleanor Carman 

Digital Equipment Corporation 

Bradford and Ellen Cannon 

The Concord Journal 

The Lincoln Historical Society 

The Mass. Council on the Arts § Humanities 

Robert B. and Mary S. Newman 

Mr. § Mrs. William T. Payne 



137 



STATISTICS - 1983 

General 

Number of days open 289 

Fines collected 3,429.59 

Acquisitions 
Books 

Inventory 1982 57,568 

Purchases 2,706 

Gifts 386 

Total Inventory 60,660 

Discarded or Lost 2,042 

Inventory 1983 58,618 

Books on Tape 
Inventory 1982 
Purchases 
Inventory 1983 

Records and Tapes 
Inventory 1982 
Purchases 
Gifts 

Total Inventory 
Discarded or Lost 
Inventory 1983 2,601 

Circulation 

Adult Books 44,140 

Children's Books 34,581 

Total Books 78,721 

Records and Tapes 5,118 
Misc. Peridicals, rentals, etc. 6,931 

Total all materials, 1983 circ. 90,770 

Programs 

Adult Programs 
Childrens's Programs 

Non- Library groups 

Total Programs 

Program Attendance 
Adult 
Children' s 

Non -Library groups 

Total Attendance 5,215 





21 




13 




34 


2 


,508 




129 




57 


2. 


,694 




93 





62 




151 




42 




255 


1 


,510 


3 


,111 




594 



138 



DE CORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Margaret L. Wengren, President 

John B. French, Vice President and Clerk 

Walter Salmon, Treasurer 

Robert Allen 

Robert Brannen 

Irene Briedis 

Lynn Gar gill 

Mildred Lee 

Steven Manos 

Francis Moult on, Jr. 

Margaret-Ann Rice 

Barbara Sisson 

Carmen Verrier 



139 



PRESIDENT'S REPORT 

Just at the time the annual report to the Town went to print last 
January 83, the DeCordova and its Director, David Katzive, were parting 
company. The Concord Journal headlined, "It was a bad fit," and so it was. 
Despite good will on both sides, it became obvious that David Katzive' s 
view and the Board's view of how the Museum should operate were not com- 
patible. With the Museum's financial health in jeopardy and staff morale 
ailing, a parting of ways was the only answer. 

The Trustees at once appointed Eleanor Lazarus, Director of the School 
and Educational Planning, to serve as Interim Director. They also organ- 
ized a Search Committee with John B. French as Chairman, and gave them- 
selves until June to look for a new Director on their own. Many candidates 
were screened and several were interviewed but no selection was made. 

At this point, Peter Rabinowitz, President of the executive search 
firm P. A. R. , Associates, very generously offered us the services of his 
company to assist us with the search. He worked closely with the Board to 
better analyze DeCordova 's needs, problems and goals in order to define 
the qualities of its Director. The requirements evolved as: administrative, 
financial and development experience; background in art history with cura- 
torial and collections management accomplishments; and the personality and 
ability to deal effectively with all the various groups who are the 
DeCordova 's constituency. With these guidelines, P. A. R. went to work and 
spent the Fall narrowing the field to the candidates the Search Committee 
is now meeting. 

Certainly our greatest needs and problems involve money, and to affect 
DeCordova 's real goals, the incoming Director must be experienced in fund- 
raising and fiscal management. The loss for the year ended December 31, 
1982, as shown on the financial statements which are a part of this report, 
was $130,262. In 1983, Walter Salmon and his Finance Committee worked with 
Ellie Lazarus to pare down the budget to essentials but still provide for 
quality exhibitions and good care of the Museum buildings and our Park. 
We successfully obtained grants: $45,000 from the Massachusetts Council on 
the Arts and Humanities, and $16,500 from the National Endowment for the 
Arts. For the first time the Board of Trustees undertook in the Spring a 
special fund-raising of its own apart from the annual appeal. Also, as is 
mentioned later, the Museum sponsored a very successful auction. This 
strict budget control and additional fund raising brought us to the end 
of the year with a far brighter financial picture than had been projected. 
Although we will not have audited statements for several months, we be- 
lieve the Museum operated at about breakeven in 1983, even without the 
benefit of two bequests for which we are most appreciative. Elizabeth Lee 
of Chestnut Hill, a devoted student at the School, left us a handsome gift 
in thanks for her enjoyment of the DeCordova classes. At her death, 
friends cooperated to arrange a retrospective showing of her work at the 
School. The other gift came from the estate of Ann Monks Banks, a long- 
time Lincoln resident and early supporter of the DeCordova. However, in 
1983 certain critical needs remained unsatisfied such as adequate staff 
salary increases and appropriate care for the collection. 



140 



President's Report Continued 

The extra fund-raising activity by the Board in 1983 is an acknowledge- 
ment that trustee responsibility for today's museum must include active ef- 
forts to provide through gifts or other means the financial backing that 
is needed along with the DeCordova's other income to make the institution 
economically sound. 

For 1984, the Museum again has a balanced budget but this budget does 
not indicate that the DeCordova's financial problems are solved. Funds to 
balance the budget were in part provided by the willingness of the Trustee 
of the DeCordova Trust to transfer funds temporarily from low-yielding com- 
mon stocks to higher-yielding bonds. While providing more current cash 
income, this change in the portfolio obviously exposes the Museum to long 
run risk, particularly if inflation accelerates. Second, this budget fails 
to provide adequate funds for preservation and storage of the collection. 
These problems, which are of long standing, could be issues in the forth- 
coming periodic review of the Museum for reaccreditation. Thus, while 
the financial problems of the Museum are less acute than at the end of 
1982, more funds are a necessity if the Museum is to both better fulfill 
its mission and serve its constituencies. 

Although the year has had its low points and real concerns, there have 
been many accomplishments and above all, a will-to-live, with the sustain- 
ing backing of stalwart supporters and extraordinary strengths of the 
staff. It's hard to think of Eleanor Lazarus as "Interim" Director, be- 
cause from the day she took on this difficult assignment a year ago, she 
has done the job with expertise and the fine touch of a seasoned admin- 
istrator. She has commanded (wrong word for Ellie) - she has warranted 
the respect of the Board of Trustees, the staff, and the membership. 
Special recognition really must go to the people who have made the School 
keep going while Ellie could not: they are Linda Foster, Bee Warren, and 
Mary Woodies, and the fine faculty as well. 

Ellie, together with the Board, weathered wrenching staff departures. 
Peggy Burke who arrived as Development Director to discover that David 
Katzive who hired her was leaving, worked hard for DeCordova for six 
months then left us to work for SPNEA. Peggy continues an interest in the 
DeCordova as a volunteer member of our Development Committee. Two major 
changes involved Mika Hornyak, Director of the Corporate Program leaving 
to go to business school, and Angela Gillen, Membership Director, joining 
her husband on an exciting teaching assignment in Athens. Laurie Lingham 
left the position of Assistant Curator to return to a former affiliation, 
and Rob Whitaker, prized Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds, left 
DeCordova for a more reasonable commute (less than an hour and 20 min- 
utes) now that he has a fourth child to get home to. 

Through these "passages" Ellie kept heart, read innumerable resume's 
and filled the membership job with our own capable Joan Sinatra to work 
with the Associate Council and the annual appeal; hired Joan Bragen, with 
fine experience, for the Corporate Program; added Bob Little with 



141 



President's Report Continued 



excellent recommendations for the Buildings and Grounds slot, and Frank 
Priest to replace retiring John Anderberg as School Custodian. And, she 
filled the important vacant curatorial spots, first with Lisa Weber Green- 
berg as Assistant Curator, and then placed Rachel Rosenfield Lafo, with a 
background of distinction in contemporary art history and conservation, as 
Senior Curator of the DeCordova. 

Amazingly, we are the stronger for these changes, because, in filling 
the positions, we have had to think long and hard about where we are going 
and who can best help us get there. With Ellie Lazarus making these wise 
appointments, and with her budgetary acumen, it would seem obvious that 
she is capable of running the DeCordova. However, Ellie regards herself as 
an educator rather than museum administrator, and prefers to return to the 
School and educational outreach programs, both areas of core strength to 
the DeCordova. The Board of Trustees cannot thank her appropriately for 
the good sense, good humor, sense of organization and feeling of well- 
being that she has brought to the DeCordova as Interim Director. 

This period of self-examination has brought other benefits. A Personnel 
Committee task force, which included Ellie, two staff members and two 
Trustees, studied closely and re-defined Employee Benefit Policies. Walter 
Salmon chaired a group who worked all summer to organize the Board into 
useful standing committees. Margot Lindsay, professional advisor on the 
structure of governance of non-profit institutions, contributed her most 
helpful services to work with the group. The result was a solid roster of 
committees, each chaired by a Trustee, but often including non-Board 
members, which will provide the Director with well-defined sources of ex- 
pertise to serve the DeCordova' s needs. 

The DeCordova Corporation has exercised the Town's endorsement of an 
enlarged Board to include non-resident Trustees. In January, Francis 
Moulton of Concord was elected in tandem with Irene Briedis of Lincoln; 
in December Mildred Lee of Belmont was elected with Robert Brannen as 
her Lincoln counterpart. Another new Trustee is Steven Manos of Lincoln, 
appointed by the Selectmen following Dorothy Thompson's resignation. In 
March 1984 a third pair of Trustees are to be elected, bringing the full 
count to fifteen which, for now, would seem to be an ideal number. 

Some of the stalwart supporters through thick and thin have to be 
recognized: the Associate Council who hosted another delightful "Evening 
with Julian" as well as other events for members, new and old; and Rob 
Allen's Business Council and their Corporate Program; the docents who 
gave time to be trained and talent to interpret exhibitions for our gallery 
visitors; the volunteers who pulled off an auction last May that netted 
$23,000 for the Museum, and, with Trustees Margaret-Ann Rice and Carmen 
Verrier as sparkplugs, plan to do it again this coming May. 

Ellie Lazarus reports on the year's programs and exhibitions but she 
won't tell you that it was her own discerning eye that spotted the 



142 



President's Report Continued 



Abakanowicz exhibition for us and her informed sense of risk that per- 
suaded the Board to undertake a show that would be costly and require un- 
usual funding sources and good attendance to cover the costs. It paid its 
way and it earned the Globe's appraisal as one of the Boston- area's five 
best art exhibitions in 1983. 

The Search Committee is now having second-round interviews with three 
candidates for new Director, and the Trustees and key staff members will 
meet them. Each candidate has the qualities we require and the selection 
is going to be difficult. It must be a "good fit" this time. So much de- 
pends on that chemical balance of right relationships between Director 
and Board of Trustees, between Director and staff, between Director and 
the DeCordova constituency, between Director and the Town of Lincoln. The 
Town has, felt uncertainties about the DeCordova in the last few years 
but you have also known that it is an ongoing significant institution. 
With all the wisdom the Trustees can bring to its governance and with 
your pride, affection and support for it, DeCordova will continue to en- 
rich, educate and entertain the people of the area with special concern 
for those who live in Lincoln. 



143 



DIRECTOR'S REPORT 

The DeCordova has been known for its ability to bring a little bit of 
that "art something" to everyone. Such a view of what we might call 
popularism, however, never got in the way of quality. The Museum's 1983 
programs have marked a renewal of emphasis toward reaching a public of 
varied ages, interests and means. Join me a little and see what I mean. 

The Museum's exhibitions for 1983 have been heralded by the Boston 
Globe , Art Forum magazine, and Chuck Kramer of Boston's Channel 5. Be- 
ginning with an exhibition called "Settings," the DeCordova exhibited 
the work of Carole Bolsey, Neill Fearnley, and Joyce Loughran, three 
young and prominently growing Boston artists whose work individually in- 
terprets inside and outside environments. 

The next exhibition filled the galleries with gales of laughter which 
accompanied William Wegman's photographs, drawings, and video vignettes. 
As Robert Taylor of the Boston Globe said, "His art is a series of strat- 
egies for avoiding narcissism. By employing his dog as the main performer 
rather than himself, Wegman gets rid of pretension. Best of all, he re- 
minds us that art, in addition to its other qualities, spiritual and 
material, is and should be fun." 

An exhibition of another humorist, Ed Koren, well-known cartoonist of 
the New Yorker , followed Wegman, complemented by an exhibition of the new 
work of one of DeCordova 's old friends, Jack Wolfe, who lives in nearby 
Stoughton. 

DeCordova 's continuing tradition of showcasing New England contempo- 
rary artists culminated this year in our summer exhibition, "Art of the 
State," a celebration of the Massachusetts art scene today. "Art of the 
State" presented award-winning paintings, prints and drawings by Massa- 
chusetts artists from the prestigious Artists Foundation's Artists Fellow- 
ship Program. 

The year's knock-out of a show came with the restrospective of the 
work of Magdalena Abakanowicz, an internationally acclaimed Polish artist 
whose large-scale works in fiber struck audiences with the power of their 
message. Their message was deep: the suffering, searching, fragility, yet 
regenerative attributes of humanity — all very close to and inseparable 
from the artist herself. Ms. Abanakowicz was in residence at DeCordova 
for three weeks. Struck as she was by the beauty of DeCordova' s landscape, 
she introduced herself to me with these words: "You have such a beautiful 
place.' I would like very much to build a permanent installation for your 
grounds." On permanent loan from the artist, "Wheel and Standing Fig- 
ure" was built during her three-week stay in September. Because the full 
range of Abakanowicz' s work had never before been seen in the United 
States and because this exhibition was the only one on the East Coast, 
attendance from artists and art-lovers was large and geographically broad. 

As the winter approached, DeCordova hosted "Awards in the Visual 
Arts 2," providing exposure for artists selected from ten different regions 
of the country. The exhibition was part of a larger program, administered 



144 



DIRECTOR'S REPORT (continued) 

by the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art, designed to ensure sup- 
port, patronage and exposure for selected artists. 

The eclectic nature of the 1983 exhibition program mirrors the variety 
of offerings in all other arenas of the Museum. The Museum School, for the 
first time offering photography classes in a studio fully equipped for 
black-and-white and color work, brings in an ever widening group of stu- 
dents. It is increasingly evident that DeCordova students mean business. 
They are not there for diversion. They are serious. Office staff are more 
prepared than ever to offer counsel to the student in order to find the 
"right class" and measurable progress from one term to the next. More 
scholarships are available for students of all ages because of contribu- 
tions earmarked for the School. Although the School's student population 
is vigorous and healthy, the goal of better integration with and use of 
exhibitions by School staff and students is yet to be tackled. Exhibition 
design for 1984 promises to promote such interaction. 

The School's popular summer program for children, called "Art and the 
Environment," drew attention to DeCordova 's most reliable resouce — its 
park. Five energetic instructors, with the help of naturalists from the 
Audubon Society, scattered hither and yon using the park as their subject 
and their medium. The park, for the first time, in addition became a 
focus for afternoon and evening programs: rocks and flowers, ornamental 
and exotic trees, constellations of summer. Music and dance concerts were 
offered to wide varieties of audiences. A spring series brought new 
musical and dance compositions to the DeCordova community, funded by the 
Massachusetts Council on the Arts and Humanities. All three groups in 
the series were winners or finalists in the Massachusetts Fellowship 
Program. 

The summer concert season was extremely well-attended with highlights 
such as Banchetto Musicale playing Vivaldi's "Four Seasons," Real Steel, 
and The Klezmer Conservatory Band. The series brings audiences of ap- 
proximately 10,000 to the DeCordova. Of those 10,000, 2,000 are mem- 
bers and 1,000 are Lincoln residents. They introduce a large, non-Museum 
going crowd to the grounds and thus are a major component of our "populist" 
objectives. We are, however, unfortunately, projecting that 1984 must 
bring a change in the admission fee structure since performance fees have 
doubled and tripled in the last three years, and our prices have not 
changed. 

Bejeweling our year of programs is always a special lecture, funded 
by the Cronin Family. 1983 brought in social critic and author, Susan 
Sontag. Ms. Sontag, who seeks to understand how the literary, visual, 
and performing arts reflect the disturbing realities of our time, read 
from her most recent work and provocatively answered probing questions 
from a well-' informed audience. A four-part photography lecture series, 
the third of its kind, brought topics ranging from computer technology 
to infant /still life photographs. 



145 



DIRECTOR'S REPORT (continued) 



The DeCordova has not only been extending its reach outward but has 
also been examining its inside mechanisms. We are due for Museum reaccredi- 
tation and that means meticulous self-examination. We must overcome acute 
collection storage problems; we must improve a cumbersome, inefficient 
mailing system; we must reexamine labor-intensive record-keeping systems 
in the School, in membership, and in the curatorial office. Much ground- 
work has been laid to make changes in each of these areas, all important 
in serving those who look to the DeCordova for education and entertain- 
ment. 

I shall only be writing one Director's report. In my three years at 
DeCordova, it has become ever more obvious that the developed and unde- 
veloped potential of the Museum is very special. Its unique meaning to 
each person sets it apart from any museum in the Greater Boston area. A 
real gem was entrusted to the Town of Lincoln and I cannot think of a 
town which has a better record to show that it can and will continue to 
promote its well-being. 






146 



DE CORDOVA MUSEUM STAFF — December 31, 1983 

Administrative Staff 

Eleanor Lazarus, Acting Director 

Joan Kennedy, Assistant to the Director 

Martha DeFrancesco, Bookkeeper 
Curatorial Staff 

Rachel Lafo, Senior Curator 

Lisa Greenberg, Assistant Curator 
Education and Programming Staff 

Eleanor Lazarus, Assistant Director for Education 

Linda Foster, School Manager 

Bee Warren, Assistant School Manager 

Mary Woodies, Secretary 

Robert Goss, Store Manager 

Gayle Rich, Performing Arts Coordinator 

Barbara Stecher, Program Specialist 

Frank Priest, School Custodian 
Development Staff 

Joan Sinatra, Membership Director 

Toni Cantlin, Membership Secretary 

Joan Bragen, Corporate Program Director 

Deborah Cassady, Corporate Program Assistant 
Public Relations Staff 

Susan Jaeger, Public Relations Director 

Jean Brueggenjohann, Designer 

Eric Shambroom, Photographer 

Paula Christman, Receptionist 

Charlotte Kupiec, Receptionist 

Joseph Mercurio, Mail Room Clerk 

Barry Higgins, Mail Room Clerk 
Buildings and Grounds Staff 

Robert Little, Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 

James Kougeas, Buildings Manager 

Frank Balduf, Buildings Project Specialist 

Arthur Comer, Maintenance 

Stephen Cucinotta, Guard 



147 



DE CORDOVA MUSEUM BUSINESS COUNCIL - December 31, 1983 



Chairman 

Robert Allen, Dor emus & Company 

John H. Cantlin, Hudson Lock, Inc. 

John Carter, Charles River Partnership 

Peter Farwell, Newsome & Company 

Kenneth Germeshausen, E.G.& G. , Inc. 

Gregory Kolligian, Selame Design Associates 

Ronald Massa, Dynatrend, Inc. 

Howard McMahon, Arthur D. Little, Inc. 

Robert Meghreblian, Distrigas 

Louis Rusitzky, Adams, Harkness & Hill 

Paul Schratter, Amicon Corporat ion 

Stephen Stone, Converse Rubber Company 

Alma Triner, Arthur D. Little, Inc. 

Marilyn Woodworth, Bank of Boston, Norfolk 

William Zellen, State Line Potato Chips 



148 



DE CORDOVA MUSEUM ASSOCIATE COUNCIL - December 31, 1983 

Chairman 

Carmen Verrier, Lexington 

Council Members 

Judy Giroux, Acton 

Audrey Pilbosian, Arlington 

Judith Brown, Bedford 

Lorraine Massa, Bedford 

Judy Bangs, Carlisle 

Ethyl ReSavage, Chelmsford 

David Chase, Concord 

Kristin Joyce, Concord 

Joyce Fearnside, Lexington 

Miriam Richmond, Lexington 

Marlis Schratter, Lexington 

Victoria Wallins, Lexington 

Julie Pugh, Lincoln 

Barbara Sisson, Lincoln 

Robyn ReSavage, Lowell 

Dale dePeyster, Needham 

Barbara Hurwitch, Needham 

Es telle Ringer, Newton 

Annette Saltzman, Newton Center 

Ruth Glass, Newtonville 

Caroline Collings, Stow 

Laura Orsatti, Stow 

Susan Weiss, Sudbury 

Keena Clifford, Way land 

Judith Norton, Wellesley 

Ruth McManus, Wellesley Hills 

Members-at-Large 
Sandy Maczko, Bedford 
Barbara Garrison, Lincoln 
Susan Lesburg, Newton 
Sherry Autor, Newton Centre 
Marie Bedrosian, Watertown 



149 



DE CORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 



STATEMENT OF SUPPORT, REVENUE, EXPENSES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 





Continued 




1982 






Unrestric 


ted 


Restricted 


Combined 




Operating 


Operating 


Total 




Fund 




Fund 


(Note F) 


Expenses : 










Program services : 










Events 


$ 22,718 




$ 17,695 


$ 40,413 


Exhibitions 


220,987 




14,750 


235,737 


Museum school and store 


256,005 




73,636 


329,641 


Summer concerts 


19,310 




12,450 


31,760 


Publications 


158,458 






158,458 


New Works 


6,148 




1,658 


7,806 


Total program services 


683,626 




120,189 


803,815 



Supporting services: 

Administration and general (in- 
cluding interest of $24,132 and 
$17,568, respectively) 
Buildings and grounds 
Depreciation of fixed assets 
Membership and development 

Total supporting services 

Total program and support 
expenses 



210,419 

114,654 

25,807 

45,297 

396,177 



1,079,803 



6,000 



6,000 



126,189 



210,419 

120,564 

25,807 

45,297 

402,177 



1,205,992 



Excess (deficit) of support 

and revenue over expenses 

from current operations (147,762) 



Purchase of fixed assets (Note B) 

Purchase of works of art 

Advances to unrestricted operating 

fund 
Grants and gifts received current 

year, not expended 

Net increase (decrease) in fund bal- 
ances for the year before capital- 
ization of works of art and fixed 
assets 

Add purchases of works of art re- 
corded as assets (Note B) 

Add purchases of fixed assets (Note 

Change in fund balance for the year 
Fund balance, beginning of year 

Fund balance, end of year 



(59,330) 
(4,488) 

8,500 



(8,500) 
17,500 



(147,762) 

(59,330) 
(4,488) 



17,500 



(203,080) 


9,000 


(194,080) 


59,330 
B) 4,488 




59,330 
4,488 


(139,262) 
118,457 


9,000 
8,500 


(130,262) 
126,957 


$(20,805) 


$ 17,500 


$ (3,305) 



ISO 



DE CORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 



STATEMENT OF SUPPORT, REVENUE, EXPENSES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 
for the year ended December 31, 1982 

1982 



Support and revenue: 
Support : 

Gifts to annual appeal 
Grants and gifts 

Total support 

Revenue : 

Individual membership 

Corporate membership 

Admissions 

Museum school and store 

Summer concerts 

Benefits and other programs 

Income from trust funds (Note C) 

Miscellaneous 

Sale of Assets (Note E) 

Total revenue 

Total support and revenue 



Unrestricted 


Restricted 


Combined 


Operating 


Operating 


Total 


Fund 


Fund 


(Note F) 



$ 49,404 


$ 


$ 49,404 


81,536 


19,368 


100,904 


130,940 


19,368 


150,308 


90,142 




90,142 


86,900 




86,900 


55,069 




55,069 


304,700 


73,636 


383,336 


25,095 


12,450 


37,545 


9,945 


15,735 


25,680 


215,849 




215,849 


8,121 


5,000 


8,121 


5,280 




5,280 


801,101 


106,821 


907,922 


932,041 


126,189 


1,058,230 



151 



DE CORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 
BALANCE SHEET, December 31, 1982 



1982 





Unrestricted 


Restricted 


Combined 




Operating 


Operating 


Total 


ASSETS 


Fund 


Fund 


(Note F) 


Current assets: 








Cash 


$ 26,100 


$ 


$ 26,100 


Due to restricted operating fund 


(17,100) 


17,100 


- 






400 


400 


Loan to officer 


23,500 




23,500 


Inventory, at lower of cost or 








market 


5,850 




5,850 


Prepaid expenses 


2,159 




2,159 



Total current assets 



40,509 



Plant: 

Fixed assets purchased subsequent 
to January 1, 1978, net of ac- 
cumulated depreciation 
(Notes B and D) 134,530 

Works of art purchased subsequent 

to January 1, 1976 (Note b) 169,012 



Total assets 



$344,051 



17,500 



$ 17,500 



58,009 



134,530 

169,012 

$361,551 



LIABILITIES 

Current liabilities: 

Notes payable, current portion 

(Note D) 206,137 

Accounts payable and accrued 

expenses 106,366 

Advance payments for Museum 

school tuition 36,393 

Total current liabilities 348,896 

Notes payable (Note D) 15,960 

FUND BALANCES 

Unrestricted operating fund balance (20,805) 
Restricted operating fund balance 

Total fund balances (20,805 ) 

Total liabilities and 

fund balances $344,051 



17,500 
17,500 



$ 17,500 



206,317 
106,366 

36,393 
348,896 

15,960 



(20,805) 
17,500 

(3,305) 



$361,551 



152 



BEMIS LECTURE TRUSTEES 

Saville R. Davis 
Amalie M. Kass 
Margaret Touborg 

The Bemis Committee 

Rebecca Chase Ann Gannett 

Nancy Coons Lee Harrison 

Nancy Ellis Jeanne Healey 

Deborah French Lucia MacMahon 

The Bemis Trustees are pleased to report another successful year of 
lectures designed to fulfill George Bemis 1 mandate to provide "an annual 
course of public lectures of an instructive and elevating character." 
In February, Bradford Washburn, Chairman of the Board of the Science 
Museum, brought adventure and beauty to Lincoln with his illustrated talk, 
"Mapping the Grand Canyon." Dr. Washburn's lecture was the first annual 
John Todd Lecture commemorating the generous bequest made by John Todd 
to the lecture fund. Paul Brooks introduced Dr. Washburn and gave a brief 
memorial of John Todd and of the contributions made by the Todd family to 
the town of Lincoln. 

On a more somber note, the April lecture was given by Harvey Brooks, 
Professor of Technology and Public Policy at Harvard University. He 
discussed "Nuclear Weapons: Hard Questions the Public Must Face," and 
developed the rationale for a "nuclear arms build-down." 

The final Bemis lecture of the year was planned to coordinate with the 
town-wide Land Use Conference held the end of October, William K. Reilly, 
an urban planner and President of the Conservation Foundation in Washington, 
D. C, titled his talk "Surviving Success and Changing Gracefully: Lessons 
in Town Planning from Around the World." His stimulating discussion of 
town planning provided a keynote for the land^-use conference. 

The three lectures were well attended and the audiences responded 
with provocative questions and comments after each one. The trustees 
appreciate the assistance of the Bemis Committee and the cooperation of 
the School Department and other town officials. 



153 



RECREATION COMMITTEE 

Monika Duborg 
Susan Harding 
D'Arcy MacMahon 
George Seeley 
Conrad Todd 
John Walker 

In 1983 after meeting with the Selectmen the Recreation Committee agreed 
to disband and be replaced by a new committee made up of two holdovers and 
four new appointees. The new committee was formed to review the recreational 
needs of the town and recommend courses of action. 

During 1983 the Day Camp Committee continued to run a successful four 
week program for 147 Lincoln children ages preschool to eighth grade. 22 of 
the 41 paid positions on the staff were held by Lincoln residents. In spite 
of the continued operation of the camp based 100% on user fees, the enrollment 
represented the same percent of school aged children as in previous years. 

The Tennis Committee continued to oversee the maintenance of the town 
courts and programs and raised over $1,000. through sticker sales. 

The work of the new committee during the latter part of the year produced 
a Recreation Bulletin listing all known recreation activities of interest 
to townspeople and individuals to be contacted for information. Included 
in the town-wide mailing of this bulletin was a questionnaire designed to 
elicit the interest level people might have in various activities including 
many not now available. 

Committee plans at the end of the year also called for the hiring of a 
part time recreation director. The committee has concluded that for the 
town to actively and consistently support old and new activities it was 
essential that a director be employed. Based on the town response to the 
questionnaire, the availability of a part time director, and guidance from 
townspeople, the committee has high hopes for the beginnings of a broader 
and more comprehensive recreation program for 1984. 



154 



LINCOLN YOUTH COMMITTEE 

Sarah Bobbitt 

John Walker 

Jane Tat lock, Chairman 

Julia S. Pugh, Youth Director 

The Lincoln Youth Committee's mandate is "to promote, coordinate and 
evaluate activities for Lincoln's youth and be responsive to their needs" 
during the school year. The three members (appointed by the School Committee, 
Selectmen, and Recreation Committee) hire the Director and meet with her/him 
on the first Friday of each month at 8 a.m. at Center School. Agendas and 
minutes of all meetings, which are open to the public, are prepared by the 
Director and placed on file at the Town Offices. 

This year reflected a change in interests on the part of Lincoln's youth, 
and a corresponding change in the focus of the committee. The second "Holiday 
Homecoming" party at Pierce House in December for all Lincoln young people 
of high school and college age was successful enough to warrant continuation 
of this tradition. In addition, a ninth grade reunion was sponsored in 
January, which served to bring our most recent graduates together. As school 
age population declines, the older students seem to be more interested in 
getting together, and are beginning to assume some of the responsibility in 
arranging the parties. 

Declining enrollment has also brought declining interest in some herto- 
fore popular activities such as swim parties, roller skating parties, and the 
Wednesday afternoon movie series. Since the Youth Committee strives for cost 
effective expenditure of funds, these activities were cut back. 

The monthly Friday night dances have continued to be popular and seem 
to serve a real need for the Grade 6 - Grade 8 students, since they continue 
to be well attended. With the inception of a signed behavior code and pledge 
by parent (s) to chaperone, these evening events have progressed more smoothly 
than in the past. 

Most of the after school sports and other activities focused on children 
in Grades 2-8 and were operated successfully. Ski trips included high school 
students as well as 5th through 8th graders. The Job Bank continues to be 
updated periodically and helps to match supply and demand for youth employment, 

The committee continued to pursue the subject of drug and alcohol educa- 
tion in Grades K-8. Julie Pugh and Sally Bobbitt attended an all day workshop 
dealing with "Children and Choices", and the committee cosponsored community 
viewing and discussion sessions of the two "Chemical People" programs on 
PBS. Monika Duborg and Nancy Donaldson were appointed as Lincoln represent- 
atives to the Concord-Assabet Council of the Office for Children, with Monika 
selected to serve on the Council's Substance Abuse Committee. 



155 



In addition to sponsoring and operating many different sports programs 
and social activities for the town's youth, the Youth Committee has the 
additional responsibility of acting as facilitator in the community, 
welcoming and supporting ideas for new youth-related programs which would 
not otherwise be available to school age children. The committee and the 
Youth Director are grateful to the many parents, volunteers, and paid 
professionals who have contributed to this year's successes. It invites 
continued input of ideas for new programs from all interested townspeople. 



156 



CODMAN POOL COMMITTEE 

Karen Boyce 

Richard Carroll 

Richard Goddard 

Stephen Neubeck 

Diane Nockles 

Paul Rosen 

Louise Toler 

Susan Harding, Chairperson 

The summer of '83 provided a perfect example of the "long, hot summer". 
From the second week of June onward it was hot and sunny, and the pool water 
bill is ample proof that we had almost no rain. Not surprisingly, the pool 
had a record high number of members and day users. We look forward to 
continued high utilization if the number of toddler swim classes is anything 
to go by. 

We wish to thank our staff for this successful season: Becky Eston, 
Pool Director; Jenifer Thomas and Frank Row as Head Guards; Jim Ehrlich, 
Swim Team Coach; Rob McMorrow as Assistant Swim Team Coach; Brooks King, 
Willy Munroe, Walter Pianka, John Smith and Jay Wang, Life Guards. Our 
new position of cashier expertly filled by Michael Corcoran with Marcie 
Pianka part-time, proved to be helpful to both pool users and staff, and 
we plan to continue the practice this comming summer. 

1984 marks the Tenth Anniversary of the Codman Pool. The committee 
feels that this provides an appropriate occasion on which to complete the 
facility as it was originally envisioned. The lack of certain amenities 
can come as no surprise to pool users since so many of you have spoken to 
me about it. I refer, of course, to the lack of shade and bathing/toilet 
facilities. Our youngest and oldest members suffer most from these de- 
ficiencies, but they affect everyone. The use of the school's field house 
facilities has not proved entirely satisfactory from the point of view of 
both users and school. They are too far away to be monitored property, and 
damage does occur periodically, to be easily accessible, or to conform to 
state law. With shaded areas available the pool can be a more comfortable 
and healthful place for a wider range of users. We anticipate that the 
integration of these needs into the overall design of the pool will enhance 
it aesthetically, physically, and socially. We hope that the town will 
support the committee's efforts to provide a permanent solution to these 
shortcomings by approving the proposed Warrant Article at Town Meeting. 

The Pool Committee welcomes town comments and ideas about the suggested 
improvements as well as all other pool matters. 



157 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Paula Bennett 

Eleanor Gallitano 

Wilson Hayes 

Joan Walker 

Elizabeth Corcoran, Chairman 

The 1982-83 school year was an exciting time of educational 
and financial challenge. During the year the School Committee 
concentrated on curriculum, budget, and the reports of the Re- 
organization Alternatives Committee and the Joint Management- 
Labor Study Committee. 

CURRICULUM 

The areas of writing, science, and computers were designated 
as curriculum goals for the year. To address these goals, broad- 
based curriculum committees were formed, chaired by principals and 
staffed by representatives across grade levels and across campuses. 

Writing - concentration on the scope and sequence of the program 
at various grade levels and an assessment of the program as a whole. 

Science - an in depth look at program, identifying overlapping 
in various areas of this curriculum and establishing a method of 
curriculum monitoring. 

Computers - staff development workshops used to train staff and 
to utilize our computers to the fullest extent possible, the end re- 
sult being an increase in computer literacy for both staff and pupils. 

The continued use of broad-based curriculum committees will in- 
sure the examination and development of curriculum strands on a cy- 
clical basis. Identified strands will be reflected in the budget 
as curriculum goals of the school system. 

BUDGET 

The School Committee lost fiscal autonomy when Proposition 2^ 
became law in 1980. The Finance Committee now has the right to de- 
termine the total expenditure it will support while the School 
Committee still retains jurisdiction over the line items which make 
up this total figure. The decisions of the School Committee with 
regard to program and management of the schools are reflected through 
the allocation of funds to these line items. Although the School 
Committee remains the decision making body, the Finance Committee de- 
termined that our decisions for FY 1983-84 must cost no more than 
those of the previous year. Thus, the schools were level funded. 



158 



The FY 1983-84 budget was built with staff involvement in the 
process and fiscal control that assigned a total amount of money for 
each school depending on the anticipated student population of that 
school. Budget requests were tied to the goals of the school system. 
These goals included staffing that maintained virtually the same 
pupil-teacher ratio for FY '84 as FY' 83, a commitment to curriculum 
work with the emphasis on reading, social studies and computers, and 
the ongoing goal to meet the needs of each individual student . 

As our student population grows smaller, it becomes increasingly 
important to recognize that Lincoln schools are located on two cam- 
puses, one within the Town of Lincoln, the other at Hanscom Air Force 
Base. The Town of Lincoln has operated the schools on the base since 
1957, under a contract that is renewed each year at Town Meeting. 
The Lincoln population, including METCO, is approximately the same 
as the Hanscom population. The total student body numbers just over 
1,000. 

The Lincoln School Committee is responsible for both campuses 
and simultaneously develops a separate budget for each campus. The 
Lincoln schools are financed by local taxes and state aid while the 
Hanscom schools are funded by the Department of Defense which assumes 
the full cost of educating the Hanscom students. The Lincoln and 
Hanscom budgets share proportionately in the expense of central office 
administration which is located in the Smith School. Teachers on 
both campuses are a part of the Lincoln School System and tenure and 
seniority extends across campuses. 

Although the enrollment on the Lincoln campus was projected to 
decline by nineteen for FY '84, and most line items were reduced in 
the budget, a decrease in enrollment does not decrease the total per 
pupil cost. There is a fixed nature to some costs such as plant, 
administration and transportation as well as existing contractual 
obligations with staff and other personnel. Some of the reductions 
taken reflect past decision to maintain specialists full time to 
allow for specialized programs. Level funding no longer allowed this 
luxury. It is important to note that 73% of the budget is found in 
salaries. It was in this area that the bulk of the needed reductions 
were taken. These reductions responded to several years of declining 
enrollment and although scheduling adjustments were anticipated, the 
school program remained rich and varied in its offerings. The high 
quality of education within the disciplines was maintained. 

REORGANIZATION ALTERNATIVES COMMITTEE 

The Reorganization Alternatives Committee, composed of staff, 
administrators and parents, was formed in the fall of 1982 to ex- 
amine future educational direction of the Lincoln School System in 



159 



order to insure quality education in the face of a decline in student 
population and increasing fiscal constraints. The charge of the School 
Committee to the Reorganization Alternatives Committee centered on 
four areas: the definition of an excellent small middle school, ex- 
ploration of alternative educational organizational structures, the 
feasibility of flexible scheduling, and examination of the status 
quo. 

The School Committee and the administration will be addressing 
the recommendations and suggestions of the Reorganization Alternatives 
Committee as long-range plans are put in place. 

JOINT MANAGEMENT-LABOR STUDY COMMITTEE 

To facilitate future negotiations, the School Committee and the 
Lincoln Teachers' Association agreed to establish a Joint Management- 
Labor Study Committee composed of teachers and School Committee desig- 
nees. This Committee met during the nonbargaining year to determine 
if inequities existed in the salary schedule, and to make recommen- 
dations to resolve these inequities. 

The recommendations of the Joint Management-Labor Study Committee, 
while not binding, did identify inequities and possible resolutions 
which were reported to the School Committee and the Lincoln Teachers ' 
Association. The negotiating teams of the two bodies will now con- 
sider these recommendations during contract talks. 



James Spindler, having served with wisdom for six years on the 
School Committee, chose not to seek re-election. The resignations 
of Hanscom Representatives Vollie Fields and Warren Hutton and 
Hartwell Principal, William Warren, were accepted with regret. Diane 
Nockles was appointed Acting Principal of Hartwell, Russell Tornrose 
was appointed Principal of Brooks and Lois Taylor was appointed 
Director of Pupil Services. Wilson Hayes was elected to the School 
Committee and Travis Thompson and Orville Eacker joined us as Hanscom 
Representatives . 

Dr. Elizabeth Twomey completed her first year as Superintendent 
of the Lincoln Public Schools. Her sensitive leadership has guided 
us through difficult budget, curriculum and staffing decisions that 
have resulted in a more cohesive school system that widens the educa- 
tional opportunities of each and every child. 



160 



A summary of the year would not be complete without acknowledge- 
ment of the superb work of staff and administrators. We appreciate 
the open communication of the Finance Committee, the P.T.A. , the League 
of Women Voters, the Reorganization Alternatives Committee and the 
Joint Management -Lab or Committee, the thoughtfulness of parents and 
the support of the Lincoln, Hanscom, and METCO communities. 

We thank you. 



161 



SCHOOL 



Hartwell 



Brooks 



*() = METCO students 



LINCOLN PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
ENROLLMENT AS OF OCTOBER 1, 1983 



GRADE 


SECTIONS 


STUDENTS* 


K 


2 


35(8) 


1 


2 


51(8) 


2 


2 


45(7) 


3 


3 


62(12) 


4 


2 


49(11) 


5 


3 


63(14) 


TOTAL : 


14 




6 


2 


44(8) 


7 


4 


75(12) 


8 


4 


81(13) 


TOTAL : 


10 





TOTALS 



305(60) 



LINCOLN CAMPUS TOTAL: 



**** 



200(33) 
505(93) 



Han scorn Primary 



Hanscom Middle 



K 


3 


68 




1 


3 


66 




2 


3 


61 




3 


4 


64 




TOTAL : 


13 




259 


4 


3 


52 




5 


3 


71 




6 


3 


75 




7 


3 


48 




8 


2 


46 




TOTAL : 


14 




292 


HANSCOM 


CAMPUS 


TOTAL: 


551 


,N PUBLIC 


SCHOOLS 


TOTAL: 


1056 



CASE and Outside Placements - Lincoln: 6 

Hanscom: 11 



162 



LINCOLN PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 



Elizabeth A. Twomey 
Juliana Marchessault 
Lois Taylor 
Robert Budds 
Maurice Wright 
Diane Nockles 
Russell Tornrose 
Sally Webber 
Ronald Hadge 



Superintendent of Schools 

Business Manager 

Director of Pupil Services 

Director of Plant Operations 

METCO Coordinator 

Acting Principal, Hartwell School 

Principal, Brooks School 

Principal, Hanscom Primary School 

Principal, Hanscom Middle School 



Hours: The Office of the Superintendent is open Monday through 
Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 



163 



LINCOLN PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



CLASS OF 1983 



Danielle-Marie Abrams 
Khashayar Mohammad Atabaki 
Alan R. Avila 
Mariana Lowell Barzun 
James E. B. Benton 
Patrick James Birmingham 
Kimberly D. Brock 
Mina D. Carter 
Sharon A. Cole 
Kathy L. Cooper 
Katherine D. Corcoran 
Thomas Ames Damon 
Evelyne Louise Delori 
Stephen Matthew Domenichella 
Rachel Elizabeth Donaldson 
Anneliese Marie Eckhardt 
Julian John Gallitano 
Brian D. Goss 
Jennifer L. Green 
Pamela Mercier Greene 
Kimberly Greenhow 
Tracey Ellen Hart 
Hans R. Hollister 
Dana Nicole Jones 
William Hastings Kitses 
Wendell Joseph Knox, Jr. 
Leila Ladjevardi 
Laura Liepins 
Kim L. Lopez 
Kimberlee Marie Lyons 
Shawn M. Marcoux 
Roy E. Martin 



Ruth Elizabeth McDougald 
Sheila Gail McNeill 
Richard Haley McMorrow III 
Lisa Marie Mola 
David L. Myers 
Shahira N. I. Nabih 
Shirley Mae Nelson 
John Joseph O'Loughlin 3rd 
Helen Thacher Perera 
Sarah Maria Stratton Perry 
Jill Rapaport 
Kenneth Alan Ritsher 
Tiffani Elizabeth Roberts 
Sarah Hildreth Russell 
Louis R. Sartori, Jr. 
Geoffrey J. Schwartz 
Donald A. Seville 
Sam Howard Silvers tein 
Shelley Anissa Smith 
Michelle Elizabeth Spreadbury 
Andrew M. Sussman 
Dana French Tatlock 
Karen H. Taylor 
Scott Earl Teabo 
Calli S. Thorne 
Walter Grant Thorpe 
Richard W. Tingey 
Lorna S. Van Horn 
Laura Jean Wallwork 
Timothy Dwight Weaver 
Tanya Diane Williams 
Richard G. Wyner 



164 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Richard F. Brooks 

Alan W. Cherish 

Raymond Clark 

Alan H. Grathwohl 

Lynn B. Donaldson, Vice Chairman 

William A. King, Chairman 

The past year has witnessed developments in many fronts at the Regional 
High School. Some of the more significant projects and efforts are as 
follows. 

Administration . Brad Sargent, the Principal of the High School, was 
named Superintendent, effective July 1, 1983 with the result that Brad 
now serves the School in both capacities. As the School enters a critical 
stage in its adjustment to changes in enrollment, student needs and priorities 
and the retirement of skilled and devoted teachers, coupled with the continued 
constraints on public spending, Brad has indicated a series of efforts to 
insure proper classroom sizes consistent with sound teaching and, most 
importantly, to provide the educational resources needed by a highly diversi- 
fied student body. 

Educational policy . As many readers of this report know, a series of 
community based coffees were held in both Lincoln and Sudbury in the fall 
of 1982 for the purposes of discussing directions at the high School, using 
as a point of focus proposed modification of the graduation requirements. 
From these gatherings there came a consensus that the high School should 
continue to provide the diversity of curriculum and program that is thought 
to be essential to a comprehensive secondary school. The School Committee 
and the Administration have taken this charge as reflective of the wishes 
of a substantial portion of our high school community and we are continually 
seeking ways to achieve these goals, notwithstanding limitation of resources. 
We are proud of the achievements of the graduating class of 1983 in many 
areas, including an exceptional number of scholarships and awards and a 
fine record of college admissions. 

Community participation . In addition to the coffees and the efforts 
of the volunteers who helped to sift through and analyze the ideas that were 
offered, a notable community effort has been undertaken through the organiza- 
tion by volunteer citizens in both towns of the Lincoln-Sudbury School 
Foundation, of which John Sirota has kindly agreed to serve as President. 
The Foundation has been formed through the efforts of concerned citizens 
in both towns to supplement and enrich the educational program at the 
high school in ways that could not be accomplished through public funding. 

Shared responsibilities . With a view to efficiency in administrative 
operation and costs, the Regional High School has continued to retain the 
services of John Wilson as Business Manager and Anthony Zarella as Special 
Needs/Student Services Director on a shared basis with the Sudbury schools. 
In addition, under the leadership of a newly-formed Committee on Building 
and Grounds we are exploring ways of utilizing the services of the Sudbury 
Park and Recreation Department in maintaining and upgrading the high school's 
athletic track and baseball diamonds and of developing a planned multi-year 
program for renovation and repair of the high school building. 

165 



Special needs education . L-S West has continued to be a highly success- 
ful program for students who require a degree of supervision and structure 
that cannot normally be provided within the main high school. Unfortunately, 
the School Committee and the Administration is faring less well in dealing 
with the heretofore uncontrolled costs of schooling for educationally handi- 
capped or disabled youngsters whose tuitions and transportation expense 
must, by law, be borne by the Regional High School (as well as by the towns 
at the lower school level). No one having responsibility for the administra- 
tion of the public high school wishes to be less than caring for and sensitive 
to the needs of these young people; at the same time, we continue to witness 
the inroads that private tuitions, transportation and other costs are making 
in our regular academic, guidance, atheletic and other programs. We cannot 
report, as of the date of this report to the towns, what the outcome of this 
matter will be; it will most certainly be a major subject in the School 
Committee's submission of the 1985 high school budget to the towns for 
hearing and town meeting approvals. 

The School Committee . Much of the business of the School Committee 
has been conducted through its working subcommittees on, respectively, 
Student Needs Assessment, the Curriculum, Buildings and Grounds, Collective 
Bargaining and the Budget. From these subcommittees, working with Brad 
Sargent and others as appropriate, come a variety of proposals and recommenda- 
tions which are submitted to the full committee and to the communities 
for discussion in open meeting. Among the more significant efforts this 
year has been the adoption of a statement of athletic philosophy for the 
school, emphasizing among other things the importance of providing opportunity 
for team participation to as many students as possible and in a manner 
consistent with the school's educational goals. Through the Committee on 
Student Needs Assessment, the review and evaluation of changes in graduation 
requirements continues. 

The School Committee continues to seek and solicit the guidance and 
support of the citizens of both towns. We welcome and thank you for your 
participation. 



166 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 

Bradford H. Sargent, Superintendent 

The 1982-83 school year at Lincoln-Sudbury was highlighted by the 
graduation of another successful group of Seniors. These students, like 
so many before them, benefited from the fine programs offered at our high 
school, thanks to the generous support from the communities. The communities 
can take pride in the reports I receive each year from students who have 
gone on from our school either to college or to work and are warm in their 
praise of our school. 

The future presents us with a challenge. As enrollments decline and 
resources become more scarce, we must strive to maintain the excellence 
our school has achieved. I am confident that the communities wish to 
preserve this fine reputation and look forward to working with the staff, 
students and parents to achieve this goal. 

The following information will indicate some of the successes of our 
students and other details for your perusual. 



167 



LINCOLN -SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 



GRADUATES - CLASS OF 1983 



Marc L. Aaronson 
Kathryn Mary Ackroyd 
Sailing David Adler 
Deborah Catherine Allan 
Gary Spencer Allen 
Sharon B. Alsen 
David Joseph Andrews 
Stephen Edward Arees 
Karen M. Arego 
Mark Arpino 

Dianne Elizabeth Aufderhaar 
Diana Elizabeth Austin 

Andrea Marie Barnes 

Keith L. Bazarnick 

Gwenyth Beaven 

Perry Andrew Beckett 

Rebecca Bekampis 

Edward Bell 

Raoul A. Berman 
*Bonnie Leigh Beihler 
*Jo-Ann Elizabeth Bigwood 

Mari Sharon Blecher 

Steven Charles Blessington 
*Sherley E. Blood 

Greg Bochicchio 

Sharon 0. Boggs 

John S. Bombara 

Donald Joseph Bowers, Jr. 

Erin Martha Boyce 

David C. Boynton 

Ariel F. Brain 

Daniel John Brasington 

Robert Steven Brown 

William G. Brown 
*Lucy A. J. Buchan 

James Mark Bursma 

Tracie L. Burt 

Christopher Byrne 

Cynthia Calendrella 
Bruce Daniel Cameron 
Christopher Caputo 
Thomas Clifford Card 
Catherine M. Carney 
David Jerome Carroll 
R. Patrick Carroll 
Bonnie Cassivi 
Heather Lei Cathcart 
Dianne Susan Chorney 
John Richard Cicciu 



Wendy Mae Cicciu 
Melvin F. Clark 
Paul Andrew Clifton 
Geoffrey Cloud 
Catherine Colburn 
April A. Considine 
J. Dietrich Cooper 
* Jennifer Lynn Cooper 
Jeanette J. Copeland 
Sarah M. Corcoran 
Karen G. Craig 
Meaghan Cronin 
Cathleen Anita Crosby 
Lisa Maria Cubelli 
Kristine Rae Curtis 
Jeffrey Page Cutler 
Douglas William Cygan 

Kevin Daly 

Stephen Daly 

Joanne Davidson 

Michelle Davis 

Karen L. Dawes 

Nicole E. DeBaryshe 

Claire Pamela Decker 

Joseph C. DeFranco 

Julie Jane Delay 

Jeffrey DelPorto 

Kimbra Yvette Dennis 
*Lorna Sonja DeRosa 

Erin Elizabeth Docherty 
*Denise Anne Doiron 

David Dreher 

Susan Kay Durbin 

Charles Durso 

Michael Joseph Einhorn 
Lawrence Q. Elliott 
William W. Fegley 
Lauren B. Feldman 
Jay John Fenlason 
Patricia A. Fennell 
Lisa Ann Fiering 
*Nicola Jane Fildes 
James Joseph Finamore 
Neil John Fisher 
Charles Hastings Fosgate 
Regina Anne Fox 
Eytan Frank 
Jonathan S. Franklin 
Laurie Ann Franklin 



168 



Paul Anthony Fredella 
*Karen Margaret Fredrickson 
*Robert Andrew Freedman 

Josie Anne Freed 

John Herbert Freeman, IV 

Gregory Dean French 

Lisa Patricia Fulks 

James J. Fussillo 

Robert Evan Gabbe 

Jacquelyn Ann Gale 

Daniel Edward Gallagher 
*Lee McCandless Garth 

Lynn Geisselbrecht 

James A. Gerry 
*Jennifer Laura Gitlin 

Christina A. Glaser 

Madelyn Jo Glist 

Julie Ann Glovin 

Amy Jo Golder 

Andrew David Goldstein 

Michael Eliot Gordon 

Robert C. Gorgone 

William Greaves 

Peter Gross 

Susan Elizabeth Guindon 

Roberta Gulick 

Rustom Adi Guzdar 

*Sylvia M. Hadcock 

Richard T. Halstead 

Nancy J. Halter 

Valerie M. Hannon 

Anne Stuart Harding 

Wayne Scott Hardy 
*Susan Harris 

Douglas G. Hartman 

Shari L. Hasche 

Laura Haughey 

Elisabeth C. Hayes 

Mary Heavey 

Patricia Ann Hennessy 
*Charyl Lynne Hetrick 

Eliza W. Hibben 

Peter E. Hinlein 

Jennifer K. Hoagland 

Alice Margaret Hoben 

Thomas George Hoff 
*John E. Hogan 

Matthew S. Holland 

Laurel W. Home 

Scott Horton 

Darryl Brian Hotch 

Cynthia Lee Howell 
*Paul Huffman 



Douglas Huie 
Evan C. Hunt 
Arthur Andrew Hurwitz 

Deneya M. Jackson 
Kristine Lynne Jaixen 
Julia Anesa James 
David Joseph Johnson 
Lynne Ann Johnson 
James G. Johnston 
James Benton Jones 

*Andrew S. Kahn 
Jeffrey Paul Karloff 
Patricia Anne Keane 
Rachael Rebecca Keevil 
Annette Denise Kelley 
Scott David Kellstedt 

*Kathleen M. Kern 

*Cynthia G. King 
David King 

Ellen Frances Kirrane 
David J. Kneeland 
Karen Elizabeth Knoll 
Katrina A. Kruse 

* Annie Kutenplon 
Mark Johnson Kutz 

Karen Jeanne Lankau 

Stephanie Elizabeth Lanza 

Miriam Louise Laurendeau 

Kenneth M. Lavine 

Brett A. Leav 

Andrew Lehman 
*Gary Lemack 

Linda Lepordo 

Elizabeth Leslie 

Steven R. Levey 

Erica Gay Lewis 

Stephen Mark Lewis 

Steven Neil Libby 

Sandra Liepins 
*Edward Lockery 

Scot David Loiselle 

Susan Margaret Londres 

Santiago Lopez 

Brian A. Low 

Gail Ann Lucchese 

Jane F. Lynch 

Richard K. Lyons 

Deborah DeCosta MacDonald 
Scott Craig MacDonald 
Jacqueline S. Maclnnis 
Ronald Maclnnis, Jr. 



169 



Richard Allan MacLean 
Heather MacLeod 
Pamela MacNeil 
Eric Malerbi 
Joseph A. Mancuso 
Michael Marchessault 
Dante Michael Marinelli 
Linda Karen Marino 
Elizabeth Anne Marsh 
Diane Martinec 
Vincent Martinelli 
Robert J. Matthews 
Amy Elizabeth Maurhoff 
Ann Marie McCarthy- 
Maureen McDonald 
Donald G. Mclnnis 
Terrence P. McKelvey 
Beth Anne McNamara 
Martha McNamara 
Harry C. McPherson 
Anne M. McWalter 
Michael F. McWalter 
Cynthia Ann Meade 
Nicole Elena Menegakis 
Jane Alison Middleton 
Michelle D. Middleton 
Kelly Anne Mitchell 
Michael Edward George Moles 
Christine Marie Monaco 
Angela Lynn Moore 
Pari L. Moore 
John M. Moran 
Laura Beth Morgan 
Allan C. Morgan, Jr. 
Carl Andrew Morth 
Susan E. Mulcahy 
Hannah B. Munroe 
David C. Murphy 
Alicia Grace Murray 
Jennifer Curtis Murray 
Michael James Murray 
*Ben M. Mutschler 

Margaret Neal 
Skye Nelson 
Marcia Ruth Nims 
Stephen James Nitz 
Deborah Noel 
Kimberly Noel 
Karen Ann Novak 

*Linda Oechsle 

Karen Edith Olson 
*Elizabeth Oppenheim 

Mary Elizabeth O'Rourke 



Lisa Marie Ovian 

*Amy E. Pacheco 
Vito Nicolo Pampalone 
Andrew Paterson 
Gail Andrea Peisach 
Nancy Ann Pelkey 
Maureen D. Pellegri 
Stuart Andre Peters 

*Allan Martin Pettai 
Brian Edward Pietz 
Renee M. Pittman 
Mary Jane Plamondon 
Anne Poole 
Laura J. Poulin 
Lauren Beth Prince 

William T. Quinn 
Michael Patrick Quinton 

Carey Jean Rasco 
*Jane Read 
Brenda Reardon 
Michael Regenauer 
Thomas Ronald Reiling 
Pamela Richard 
Ranford Richardon 
Elizabeth Anne Riley 
Andrew L. Rivers 
Kimberley A. Rivers 
Phillip Alan Robertson 
Kinley Christopher Roby 
Steven M. Roses 
Robert Ross 
Nicole Roth 
John Adam Roush 
Daniel Ira Rubin 
James William Rushforth 

Amy Louise Sasiela 
Jennifer St. Germain 
*Clayton R. Saltsman 
Paula Leigh Schofield 
Michael Jason Schwartz 

Jeannette A. Schulz 
Dennis Marie Scialabba 
Elizabeth Newell Sellers 
Scott Semple 
Thomas To lies Seymour 
Alison Marie Sharkey 
Caroline Mary Sheehan 
Kurt R. Skinner 
Cory L. Smith 
Douglas Adam Smith 
Dean E. Smith 



170 



Pamela Holden Smith 
*Sheila D. Smith 
Mark Stephen Soerheide 
Linda Ann Spang 
Karl Ross Steudel 
Pamela Anne Stone 
Lee Haviland Stowell 
David Walter Strauss 
Kathleen Marie Sullivan 
Claire Marie Sutherland 
Emmett Daniel Sutton 
Erik W. Swanson 
Christina S. Sweeney 

Kimberly Taylor 
Susan D. Teixeira 
Angela Terry 
Donna Marie Thomas 
John Clayton Thomas 
Michael Durst Thome 
Marcy Ann Trager 
Bruce Allen Travers 
Stephen Tribou 
Scott Francis Troisi 
Kimberly Jane Truesdale 
Henrietta A. Tudela 

Julian A. Uribe 

Alessandra Vasile 
Peter Velie 

Bruce Calvert Wadman 

Amanda Wagner 

Michael David Wallace 

Michael Patrick Wallace 

Paul Victor Walsh 

David Weekman 

Diana Marie Welch 

Deborah Wells 

James E. Wilkins 

Lianne Willey 

Siobhan Williams 

Mark Williamson 

Monica Wilson 
*Ellen Sue Winer 

Christopher H. Wofford 
*Tamsen Carlene Wolfe 

Kenneth Richard Woodland 

David James Wright 

Frederick Morris Wynn, Jr. 

Heidi Ann Zirkel 



*Cum Laude 

171 



DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS ATTENDING REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL 



Lincoln 

Sudbury 

METCO (Tuition) 

Other 

Total 
Boys 
Girls 

Total 



AS OF OCTOBER 1, 1983 
1979 1980 1981 



1982 



1983 



223 


196 


197 


190 


178 


1,221 


1,179 


1,129 


1,110 


1,030 


85 


92 


97 


93 


93 


13 


9 


8 


10 


6 


1,542 


1,476 


1,431 


1,403 


1,307 


717 


705 


699 


720 


674 


825 


771 


732 


683 


633 



1,542 1,476 1,431 1,403 1,307 



9th Grade 
10th Grade 
11th Grade 
12th Grade 
Other 

Total 



358 


325 


333 


348 


314 


404 


367 


332 


359 


355 


382 


405 


368 


303 


327 


391 


379 


398 


388 


305 


7 


- 


- 


5 


6 



1,542 1,476 1,431 1,403 



1,307 



Tuition pupils attending 
other school 



30 



34 



32 



36 



39 



172 



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173 



LINCOLN -SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 
Treasurer's Report 
July 1, 1982 thru June 30, 1983 



Marcia A. Roehr, Treasurer 
Total Cash Balance, July 1, 1982 

Cash Balance, July 1, 1982 



District Fund 



Receipts 

Operating Accounts 
Sudbury Assessment 
Lincoln Assessment 

Total Assessment 
Chapter 70 
Chapter 71-16d 
Construction Aid 
Transportat ion 

Total State Aid 
School Building Rental 

Total Other Income 
Investments 
Miscellaneous Income 
Petty Cash Refund 
Tailings 

Total Sundry Income 

Total Operating Receipts 

Deduction Accounts 

Federal Withholding Tax 
Massachusetts Withholding Tax 
Blue Cross, Blue Shield 
Teachers' Retirement 
County Retirement 
Disability Insurance #1 
Disability Insurance #2 
Tax Sheltered Annuities 
Credit Union 
Teachers' Association 
United Way 
Heys Memorial Fund 

Total Deduction Receipts 

Total District Fund Receipts 

Total District Fund 



$ 3,765,723.87 
607,822.60 

707,774.00 
314,152.00 
285,798.03 
153,669.00 

27,752.83 

15,725,000.00 

116,900.10 

1,000.00 

453.74 



$ 173,265.28 



(13,729.92) 



4,373,546.47 



1,461,393.03 
27,752.83 






15,843,353.84 
$21,706,046.17 



703,162.81 






200,967.20 






50,982.69 






175,830.40 






35,843.89 






23,256.73 






438.96 






158,236.21 






255,892.00 






21,270.00 






1,117.50 






697.00 








1,627,695 


.39 




$23,333,741 


.56 




$23,320,011 


.64 



174 



Disbursements 



Operating Accounts 

Operating Budget 

Equipment 

Debt Service-principal 

interest 
Community Service 

Total Budget Disbursements 
Investments 
Petty Cash Advance 
Tailings 

Total Sundry Disbursements 

Total Operating Disbursements 

Deduction Accounts 

Federal Withholding Tax 
Massachusetts Withholding Tax 
Blue Cross, Blue Shield 
Teachers' Retirement 
County Retirement 
Disability Insurance #1 
Disability Insurance #2 
Tax Sheltered Annuities 
Credit Union 
Teachers Association 
United Way 
Heys Memorial Fund 

Total Deduction Disbursements 

Total District Fund Disbursements 
Cash Balance, District Fund, June 30, 1983 



$ 5,652,714.41 

34,914.00 

360,000.00 

20,312.50 

16.25 

15,475,000.00 

1,000.00 

914.00 



703,162.81 

200,967.20 

53,345.45 

175,830.40 

35,843.89 

22,039.14 

536.60 

156,382.49 

255,892.00 

21,270.00 

1,117.50 

697.00 



$ 6,067,957.16 



15,476,914.00 
$21,544,871.16 



1,627,084.48 
$23,171,955.64 



$ 148,056.00 



Revolving Accounts 



Miscellaneous Revolving Funds 
LSRHS Scholarship Fund 

Cash Balance, Total Revolving Accounts 
TOTAL CASH BALANCE 



94,785.07 
146,529.31 



$ 241,314.38 
$ 389,370.38 



Cash Balance, July 1, 1982 
Receipts - Principal 

- interest 

- Springthing 
Disbursements - awards 6/30/82 

- operating 

Cash Balance, June 30, 1983 



Scholarship Fund 
June 30, 1983 

$ 



122,267.99 

22,681.60 

12,833.66 

3,695.00 

14,300.00 

648.94 



146,529.31 



175 



Lincoln- Sudbury Regional School District 
Balance Sheet 
June 30, 1983 

Assets 



First National Bank of Boston 

Baybank Middlesex 

First National Bank of Boston First Rate 

Baybank Middlesex Capital 

Concord Cooperative Bank 

Bond-State of Isreal 

Certificates of Deposit 

Lincoln-Roof Repair Project 

Sudbury-Roof Repair Project 

Total Assets 



$ (6,482.20) 

17,588.23 

145,857.48 

85,552.56 

146,529.31 

325.00 

225,000.00 

1,246.70 

7,642.14 

$623,259.22 



Liabilities and Reserves 



Tailings 
Surplus Revenue 
Roof Repair Project 
Blue Cross, Blue Shield 
Disability Insurance #1 
Disability Insurance #2 
Tax Sheltered Annuities 
Block Grant 
Metco FY83 
L/S West 
Roof Repair 
Capital Outlay 
Nursery School 
Adult Education 
Cafeteria 
Athletic Fund 
Library Copy Machine 
Scholarship Fund 
Bond-State of Isreal 



$ 453.74 

345,811.84 

8,888.84 

3,308.69 

4,964.56 

.09 

18,517.08 

467.85 

858.66 

3,650.00 

(98.76) 

4,751.84 

14,941.62 

10,368.93 

48,234.49 

10,536.44 

749.00 

146,529.31 

325.00 



Total Liabilities 



Outstanding Debt 



3.1% School Bonds, payable $100,000 Feb. 1, 1984-85 
4.0% School Bonds, payable $25,000 Aug. 1, 1983 

$20,000 Aug. 1, 1984-86 
6.5% School Bonds, payable $15,000 Aug. 1, 1983-84 

Total Outstanding Debt 



$623,259.22 



$200,000.00 
25,000.00 
60,000.00 
30,000.00 

$315,000.00 



176 



LINCOLN SCHOLARSHIP COMMITTEE 

George Hibben 
Gail Najjar 
Mary Wiley 

The Lincoln Scholarship Committee counsels Lincoln students in need of 
financial aid on how and where to avail themselves of scholarships , grants 
and loans. If these sources prove to be inadequate to cover all expenses, 
the Lincoln Scholarship Fund often grants funds to bridge the final gap 
between costs and available resources. High priority is given to the needs 
of entering college freshmen who have limited access to self-help opportun- 
ities. 

This year for the first time in many years the number of applicants 
declined. Six students demonstrated need and all were assisted with grants 
of varying amounts. The Committee believes that a larger, more usual number 
of college bound students will apply for assistance in the coming year. 

The annual appeal realized the highest return ever, $3,704. Contribut- 
ing to this success was the challenge offer of the Ogden Codman Trust to 
match the contributions of the townspeople. The matching monies will be 
invested and be identified as The Ogden Codman Trust Endowment Fund. Mrs. 
Eleanor K. Tead, a long time supporter of the Scholarship Committee, bequeath- 
ed $1000 to the Fund. We appreciate this thoughtful addition to the endow- 
ment. 

At the request of the Committee, the Commissioners of Trust Funds pur- 
chased medium term, higher yielding Treasury and Federal Home Loan Notes 
using funds previously invested in a Massachusetts Municipal Depository 
Fund. Where possible investments will continue to be reallocated to maximize 
income while protecting principa 1 

The Committee offered a took ; ize to a Brooks School student who had 
made a significant contribution t the class. The student selected for this 
honor in 1983 by the school stai was Jill Rappaport. 

In recent years financial need has been the major criterion for deter- 
mining a scholarship grant. Believing community service and academic achieve- 
ment should also deserve support, the Committee plans to create a special 
scholarship in recognition of these two important aspects of student life. 

The Committee welcomes comments and suggestions about the future of 
the Lincoln Scholarship Fund. 



177 



LINCOLN- SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND COMMITTEE 

David and Dorothy Bagley 

Ray Clark 

Hugh Cole 

Mary Ann Court emanche 

Ralph and Regina Cuomo 

Steven and Karyl Fisch 

Thomas Franklin 

David Gross '84 

Stewart and Mary Ellen Hoover 

Virginia Kirshner 

Sam and Judy Merra 

Lawrence and Esther Ovian 

Marcia Roehr 

Patricia Szarek '85 

Paula Wolfe 

The Lincoln-Sudbury Regional Scholarship Fund, through the generous 
contributions of the citizens and business organizations of Lincoln and 
Sudbury, has achieved an endowment of $131,000 (an increase of 14% from 
1982). This has been made possible through our annual Fall mail appeal; 
income from Sprinthing, traditionally held the second Saturday in May; and 
memorial contributions. Perpetual endowments honoring the memory of former 
Assistant Principal, Frank Heys; John Wirzburger, '83; and John R. Kirshner, 
'64 have been established. Fund guidelines require a perpetual endowment 
of $10,000 to be fully subscribed within a five year period. 

The Fund is available to any graduate of Lincoln- Sudbury with definite 
career plans and financial need. In June of 1983 nineteen graduates were 
so recognized. A total of $15,000 was awarded to these outstanding students 
Information about the Lincoln-Sudbury Scholarship Fund may be obtained by 
calling the school (443-9961) or (259-9527). 

1983 Recipients 



Mari Blecher 
Claire Decker 
Kimbra Dennis 
Karen Fredrickson 
Madelyn Glist 
Susan Harris 
Richard MacLean 
Robert Matthews 
Terrence McKelvey 
Cynthia Meade 



Alicia Murray 

Ben Mutschler 

Karen Olson 

Mary Elizabeth O'Rourke 

Jeanette Schulz 

Kathleen Sullivan 

Angela Terry 

James Wilkins 

Kenneth Woodland 



178 



MINUTEMAN REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL DISTRICT COMMITTEE 

Term 
Expires 

Acton John W. Putnam 1985 

Arlington John P. Donahue, Chairman 1985 

Belmont Linda Frizzell 1986 

Bolton Robert Smith 1984 

Boxborough Dennis Kuipers 1985 

Carlisle William Churchill 1985 

Concord Kenneth Marriner, Jr. , Vice-Chairman 1986 

Dover William C. Greene 1984 

Lancaster Jay M. Moody 1985 

Lexington Robert C. Jackson, Secretary 1984 

Lincoln Harold A. Levey, Jr. 1986 

Needham Timothy J. O'Leary 1986 

Stow Ronald Howington 1984 

Sudbury James L. Kates 1986 

Wayland John B. Wilson 1984 

Weston Theodore G. Papastavros 1984 

During 1983 Minuteman Tech provided job training, academic classes, 
career exploration and recreational activities to more than 5,000 adults 
and young people in its evening, after school and summer programs. In addi- 
tion, there were 1201 high school and post-graduates enrolled in the regular 
day program. Thousands of residents of the district and the surrounding 
communities also took advantage of the school's many student -operated services 
for the public which include a bake shop, restaurant, retail department store, 
beauty salon, flower shop, automotive service station, auto body repair shop, 
landscaping/forestry service, catering service and printing shop. 

Developing creative partnerships with industry continued to be a top 
priority at Minuteman Tech during 1983. The goal of these partnerships 
is to improve the educational programs offered at the school and ensure 
high placement rates in industry. 

With the aid and support of 27 local businesses Minuteman Tech completed 
work on a student-constructed superinsulated house which was opened to the 
public during the summer of 1983, The Minuteman Tech Energy House is serving 
as a teaching and demonstration center for some of the latest technology in 
the area of energy conservation. Tours and classes are being held there for 
adults and for students from Minuteman Tech and other high schools. Careful 
monitoring of the efficiency of the various energy saving components in the 
design, construction and furnishing of the house is taking place. This 
information will be shared with the local businesses which are participating 
in the project. 

Now under consideration as possible future cooperative projects with 
industry are the opening of a full service commercial bank and a national 
computer sales/repair electronics retail store open to the public in the 
Minuteman Tech shopping mall. Also under consideration is the construction 
of a hotel/conference center on the Minuteman Tech campus. Representatives 
from the Boards of Selectmen and Planning Boards of Concord, Lincoln and 
Lexington have been asked to serve on the committee which is investigating 
the feasibility of the hotel project. Every effort is being made to assure 



179 



that town officials are kept informed on the progress of the project. Input 
from these officials is being actively sought and is considered a vital part 
of the planning process. 

During 1983 Minuteman Tech became the first high school in Massachusetts 
to establish an instructional program in Computer Aided Drafting (CAD) for 
its students. Beginning in January, 1984, CAD instruction will also be 
available for adults in the evening. Support from a number of local indus- 
tries helped Minuteman Tech receive a grant from the State Department of 
Education to purchase additional CAD equipment and establish the adult 
training program. 

Aided by endorsements from industry Minuteman Tech also received grants 
for adult training programs in Mold Making and Machine Shop Computer Numerical 
Control. These programs are scheduled to start in January 1984. 

The year 1983 also marked the opening of Minuteman Tech's Day Care 
Center which now operates year round providing care for childrend ages 15 
months to 4.9 years old. Located in the Child Development Center at the 
school, it is staffed by day care professionals and Minuteman Tech students 
who are being trained for jobs in the child care field. 

Cutting down the school's energy costs continues to be of prime impor- 
tance to the Minuteman Tech staff. During the past several years with the 
help of $197,000 in grants from the state Energy Office the school has 
carried out energy conservation projects within the building which have 
cut energy costs by one third. These grants have also made possible the 
installation of 48 solar panels and 3 geothermal wells. 

Minuteman Tech Assistant Superintendent Renzo Ricciuti has designed an 
automated system which enables the solar and geothermal units to operate 
together providing all of the school's hot water at a saving of 30 to 35% 
of what it would cost to heat the hot water with oil. The U. S. Office of 
Energy has become so interested in this project that it has given Minuteman 
Tech another grant of $128,700 for further expansion of the geothermal 
system for heating and cooling of the building. The ultimate goal is to 
eliminate the direct use of fuel oil entirely. 

Yearly placement figures show that approximately 60% of Minuteman 
graduates enter the work for which they trained or work related to it; 
20% of the graduates go on to 2 or 4-year colleges; 5% enter the military 
service and 15% enter occupations not related to their studies at Minuteman. 

Graduates of Minuteman Tech are being accepted at a growing number of 
top colleges and universities, including Cornell, Dartmouth, M.I.T., Georgia 
Tech, Texas A § M and Southern Methodist. 

In June, 1983, almost half of the Class of 1978 (Minuteman Tech's first 
graduating class) attended a five-year reunion dinner. This marked the first 
reunion of a Minuteman Tach graduating class and the beginning of the Minute- 
man Tech Alumni Association. 

Students and staff members of Minuteman Tech received many honors at 
state and national levels during 1983. In the national Future Farmers of 
America Nursery/Landscape competition a team of three Minuteman Tech horti- 

180 



culture students -- Joe Ascolese and Dan McDonough of Lexington and Chris 
White of Sudbury -- placed third. 

In the national Vocational Industrial Clubs of America Skill Olympics, 
Minuteman Tech post-graduate Edward Moberg of Wayland won the first place 
gold medal in Plumbing. This was the only gold medal won by a Massachusetts 
competitor. 

Three Minuteman Tech students also won fourth place Certificates of 
Honor at the National V.I.C.A. competition: Cheryl Morgan of Arlington in 
Commercial Art, David Comeau of Concord in Graphic Communications and Laura 
Ryan of Watertown in the Nurse Assistant competition. Two other Minuteman 
students received Certificates of Merit in the national competition: Philip 
Petschek of Lexington in Automotive and John Gebo of Marlboro in Auto Body. 

In the state V.I.C.A. competition, Minuteman Tech students won 22 medals- 
12 gold medals, 5 silver medals and 5 bronze medals. For the third year in 
a row Minuteman Tech horticulture students won a number of awards for their 
exhibit at the New England Flower Show and also received the Henry David 
Thoreau Award from the Associated Landscape Contractors of Massachusettts 
for off campus landscaping excellence. At the Eastern States Exposition 
the Minuteman Tech Future Farmers of America Chapter won third prize for 
its landscape exhibit. 

Eight Minuteman Tech students won awards in the state Distributive 
Education Clubs of America competition. In the New England Regional High 
School Drill Competition Minuteman Tech's Air Force Junior ROTC drill team 
placed second. 

In sports, Minuteman Tech's Field Hockey team qualified for the Eastern 
Massachusetts tournament, the varsity Tennis Team won the mixed doubles 
championship at the Commonwealth Conference All -League Tournament, and 
Minuteman Tech athletes were named to All Star teams in baseball, softball, 
golf, backetball, hockey and field hockey. 

Minuteman Tech's Director of Food Services Peter Crafts was selected 
by the Council on Hotel Restaurant and Institutional Education as the 
recipient of its 1983 Educational Achievement Award. This was in recognition 
of his role in establishing the school's first-of-its-kind partnership with 
McDonald's restaurant chain. During McDonald's first year of operation, 
60 Minuteman Tech students received fast food management training and more 
than 30 students secured part-time employment. McDonald's awarded a scholar- 
ship to a Minuteman Tech student for study of Hotel /Restaurant Management 
at Cape Cod Community College. 

Another honor came to Minuteman Tech in 1983. HIGHWIRE, a national 
magazine for high school students, chose Minuteman Tech as one of the 100 
Outstanding U.S. High Schools. 

On a sadder note, in the fall of 1983 Minuteman Tech staff and students 
found themselves mourning the tragic death of one of the most outstanding 
students the school has ever known -- Roger Eleftherakis of Lexington, 
the salutatorian of the Minuteman Tech Class of 1983. It would be difficult 
for anyone to equal his achievements in academics and in his chosen field 
of computer science, in athletics, in service to his school and community and 

181 



in human relations. Roger was well-liked by everyone who had the privilege 
of knowing him. He scored in the 95th percentile in the National Merit 
Scholarship Program and received a scholarship to Dartmouth College. He 
was an all-star athlete in football, basketball, swimming and track. He 
was President of the Minuteman Tech Honor Society and the Eastern Massachu- 
setts Association of National Honor Societies. Space does not permit a list- 
ing of all of Rogers achievements. It is enough to say that the example 
he set for future generations of students will remain forever as his legacy 
to Minuteman Tech. A scholarship fund has been established in his name. 

During 1983 there were a number of changes on the Minuteman Tech School 
Committee. After more than 14 years of distinguished service on both the 
School Committee and the Planning Board which established the Minuteman 
Tech School District, Ruth W. Wales of Lincoln and Henry L. Hall, Jr. of 
Belmont stepped down from the Committee. Linda Frizzell is the new Belmont 
member of the Committee. The new Lincoln member is Harold A. Levey, Jr. 
Ronald Howington is the new member from Stow, and James L. Kates was appoint- 
ed to replace Martin F. Craine who served as the Sudbury member for the past 
three years. 

In closing the Minuteman Tech School Committee wishes to invite all 
residents of the 16 district towns to attend the school's Annual Open House 
which will take place on Saturday, February 4, 1984 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 
(In case of bad weather, the Open House will be postponed to February 11.) 



182 



LINCOLN GRADUATES - CLASS OF 1983 



Leonore Anza 
Kimberly A. Malloy 



Horticulture 
Cosmetology 



Enrollment October 1, 1983 













Post 




Town 


Grade 9 


Grade 10 


Grade 11 


Grade 12 


Graduates 


Total 


Acton 


15 


16 


18 


9 


1 


59 


Arlington 


72 


71 


92 


59 


29 


323 


Belmont 


23 


26 


14 


14 


6 


83 


Bolton 


10 


3 


6 


7 


2 


28 


Boxborough 


2 


4 


5 


3 


2 


16 


Carlisle 


3 


3 


3 


3 





12 


Concord 


7 


9 


15 


8 


6 


45 


Dover 





1 


1 


1 





3 


Lancaster 


25 


8 


14 


12 


5 


64 


Lexington 


17 


24 


9 


30 


13 


93 


Lincoln 


6 


6 


2 


2 





16 


Needham 


16 


15 


15 


16 


3 


65 


Stow 


18 


17 


16 


13 


4 


68 


Sudbury 


31 


16 


14 


20 


3 


84 


Way land 


4 


8 


4 


4 


3 


23 


Weston 





5 


1 


5 


2 


13 


Tuition 


37 


68 


53 


32 


16 


206 



TOTAL 



286 



300 



282 



238 



95 



1201 



183 



MINUTEMAN REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL 



Assessed Apportionments for operating and capital costs for 7/1/83 to 6/30/84 
based on the number of students from each member town attending Minuteman on 
10/1/82 as a percentage of the total number of students, per section V (c) of 
agreement. Apportionments for special operating costs based on section IV (f) 
of agreement. 

CAPITAL SPECIAL APPORTION- 
TOWN PER CENT OPERATING + (DEBT) + OPERATING = MENT 



Acton 


7.16 


$ 245,350 


$-4,900 


$ 2,612 


$ 243,062 


Arlington 


31.90 


1,092,686 


-21,821 


6,111 


1,076,976 


Belmont 


7.16 


245,350 


-4,900 


2,308 


242,758 


Bolton 


2.10 


71,964 


+8,800* 


903 


31,667 


Boxborough 


1.72 


58,880 


-1,176 




57,704 


Carlisle 


0.86 


29,457 


- 588 


653 


29,522 


Concord 


5.35 


183,216 


-3,660 


903 


180,459 


Dover 


0.57 


19,627 


+2,400* 


351 


22,378 


Lancaster 


5.06 


173,386 


+21,200* 


1,924 


196,510 


Lexington 


10.98 


376,228 


-7,513 


5,191 


373,906 


Lincoln 


1.24 


42,542 


- 849 


753 


42,446 


Needham 


6.30 


215,927 


+26,400* 


719 


243,046 


Stow 


6.60 


225,723 


-4,508 


1,706 


222,921 


Sudbury 


7.55 


258,434 


-5,161 


1,655 


254,928 


Way land 


4.11 


140,675 


-2,809 


703 


138,569 


Weston 


1.34 


45,796 


- 915 


738 


45,619 


TOTALS 


100.00 


$3,425,241 


none 


$27,230 


$3,452,471 



*Based on a $400 per pupil surcharge (minimum 5 pupils) for 10 years to 
compensate 12 original member towns for debt service. 

SATE AID RECEIVED AND ANTICIPATED BETWEEN JULY 1 of 1982 and JUNE of 1983 

CATEGORY 



Transportation 

Chapter 70 (includes Special Ed.) 
Construction Grant Chapter 645 
Regional Aid Chapter 71, 16d 



$ 351,453 

1,641,553 

1,175,522 

263,221 

$3,431,749 



NOTE: State aid and District revenue are used to reduce assessed apportion- 
ments of costs to member towns. 



184 



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186 



VITAL STATISTICS 

44 births, 52 marriages and 32 deaths have been recorded during the 
year 1983 as follows: 

BIRTHS 



Date of 
Birth Name of Child 



Names of Parents 



1982 




Nov. 


23 


Dec. 


27 


1983 




Feb. 


9 


Feb. 


11 


Mar. 


10 


Mar. 


17 


Mar. 


18 


Mar. 


22 


Mar. 


22 


Mar. 


25 


Apr. 


2 


Apr. 


20 


May 


4 


May 


4 


May 


7 


May 


19 


May 


21 


June 


1 


June 


10 


June 


14 


July 


2 


July 


17 


July 


21 


July 


25 


July 


28 


Aug. 


18 


Aug. 


20 


Aug. 


31 


Sept 


. 6 


Sept 


. 8 


Oct. 


10 


Oct. 


12 


Oct. 


16 


Oct. 


19 


Oct. 


24 


Oct. 


25 


Nov. 


14 


Nov. 


20 


Nov. 


27 


Nov. 


28 


Dec, 


4 



Kyle Matthew Pinto 
Edward Christopher Kern 



Jonathan Chit Sing Leong 
Shelby Mason Foster 
Daris James Hull Paddock 
Stephen Joseph Hagenian 
Jessica Heveran Lathrop 
Danielle Kara Levine 
Stefanie Michelle Smith 
Thomas Stephen Nadolski 

Hannah Parsons Flint 
Siobhan Dobbin Liberman 
Emily Lillard Reiser 
Evelyn Havens Farny 
Emily Teresa Halainen 
Daniel Luke Natwig 
Jessica Anne Leonard 
Jessica Allen Malkin 
Olivia Cinnamond Hodgson 
Foster MacFarland Bartovics 
Nicolas Pettit Rebholz 
Alexandra Pinkney Allison 
Matthew Howard Bassett 
Jessica Crow-Rothstein 
Felicia Lauren Berenson 
Catherine Royal Mygatt 
Charles Procter Smith 
Victoria Anne Brooks 
Larom Randolph Lancaster 
Peter Melanson Brannen 
Rachel Tess Korobkin 
Caitlin Diane Green 
Warren Joseph Schudy 
Kimberly Sarah Garrett 
Nicolas Mujica Billikopf 
Caroline Tapley Carlson 
Christina Helen Von Mertens 
Hans Russell Plukas 
Michael Christopher Coppolino 
Jarrett Adam Grobleski 
Allison Connors Wiggin 



Robert W. § Claire P. Pinto 
Edward C. § Priscilla D. Kern 



Joseph Leong § Susanna Szeto 
Gerald L. § Candace F. Foster 
James L. § Ilga B. Paddock 
Mark J. § Sheryl D. Hagenian 
Scott A. Lathrop § Beatrice Heveran 
Lewis J. § Caryl G. Levine 
Steven A. § Karen S. Smith 
Thomas W. Nadolski £ Rosemary 

Fichera-Nadolski 
Jonathan A. d, Alice P. Flint 
James B. £ Ellen D. Liberman 
Georges P. § Pamela B. Reiser 
Michael H. $ Ethel H. Farny 
William J. £ Cathleen M. Halainen 
David L. § Monica G. Natwig 
Samuel E. § Sally R. Leonard 
James M. § Joan B. Malkin 
Nicholas P. £ Melissa P. Hodgson 
William A. § Susan L. Bartovics 
Robert L. Rebholz § Jennifer Pettit 
Geoffrey P. § Lesley B. Allison 
Kenneth E. Bassett £ Mary Helen Lorenz 
Peter H. Rothstein § Mary B. Crowe 
Sheldon J. § Carol K. Berenson 
Samuel G. Mygatt § Susan M. Hall 
Procter d, Laura D. Smith 
Philip H. & Susan C. Brooks 
John M. W. q Robin W. Lancaster 
John V. § Catherine M. Brannen 
Barry J. Korobkin § Laura J. Hanft 
Robert V. £ Therese T. Green 
Robert B. $ Linelle V. Schudy 
Pritchard S. § Tracy D. Garrett 
Nicolas E. § Maria Ines M. Billikopf 
Christopher T. § Jane F. Carlson 
Peter B. § Page W. Von Mertens 
John M. § Anne N. Plukas 
Michael J. § Nancy 0. Coppolino 
John Timothy $ Margaret S. Grobleski 
Richard C. § Agnes C. Wiggin 



187 



Date 


of 


Birth 


Dec. 


13 


Dec. 


14 


Dec. 


23 


Dec. 


24 


Dec. 


28 



Name of Child Names of Parents 



Laura Jin Clarke Charles R. § Suk H. Clarke 

Nicholas John Azrack Joseph F. Azrack § Abigail Congdon 

Deborah Elizabeth Sperling Arnold L. § Charmian P. Sperling 

Alexander Stewart Young George S. § Dorothy R. Young 

Laura Morten Gustavson Glenn Gustavson & Patricia A. Morten 



188 



MARRIAGES 



Eate of 
Marriage 



Names 



Residence 



Jan. 29 Fletcher Brown 

Charlotte F. Cabot 

Feb. 5 Robert Louis Rebholz 
Jennifer Pettit 

Mar. 5 Kevin W. Brook 
Judith A. Mason 

Mar. 26 James J. Moss 

Katherine Gimbel 

Apr. 2 Richard Allan Hay 
Pamela Black 

Apr. 9 John R. Panetta 

Cynthia A. Simmons 

Apr. 16 Robert W. Schuette 
Margaret Davis 

Apr. 17 Robert G. Watts 

Deborah W. Kelsey 

Apr. 24 Bruno D. Morisi 

Martha Dell Chase 

May 14 Gregory W. Martin 
Nancy E. Bonazzoli 

May 14 William Preston Palmer 
Alice Manson Lynn 

May 28 Thomas Everett Black 
Nancy Walker Ellis 

May 29 David Gideon Mandelbaum 
Kathy Ann Coons 

June 4 Richard J. McCarthy 
Judith M. Thompson 

June 5 Theodore C. Poulos 
Pamela C. Flannery 

June 12 Marcel lo Paolacci 

Gabrielle M. Fusillo 

June 18 Malcolm Tufts Shealy 
Margaret Ann Raws on 



Falmouth, Maine 
Cambridge, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Boston, Mass. 
Brockton, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Sudbury, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Hudson, Mass. 

Darien Conn . 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Dallas, Texas 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Cambridge, Mass. 
Cambridge, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

San Cesareo (Roma) Italy 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Freehold, N. J. 
Lincoln, Mass. 



189 



Date of 
Marriage 



Names 



Residence 



June 26 Paul Restuccia 
Wendy L. Torode 

July 1 Charles Ransom Smith 

Robin Alexandra Yeuell 

July 2 Frederick Clarke Winchell 
Theresa Mary Manning 

July 9 Robert DeRosa, Jr. 
Ellen Morrissey 

Aug. 6 Daryl Nash 

Kim E. Pellegrino 

Aug. 19 Frank R. Orzell 
Ann Chatham Rote 

Aug. 20 James R. High 

Celeste Covalucci 

Aug. 20 Dennis Edward Stucke 

Ellen Charlotte Keevil 

Aug. 20 Carl F. Sweeney, III 
Jane Hull Sargent 

Aug. 20 Thomas Aquinas Ortwein, Jr. 
Linda Jayne Greene 

Aug. 20 Paul Alec Marsh 

Debra Anne Ratner 

Aug. 20 Phelps K. Tracy, Jr. 
Rebecca P. Crawford 

Aug. 26 Stephen R. deMont 
Lauren L. Stevens 

Aug. 27 Louis Vincent Cintolo, Jr. 
Kathleen Ann Davidson 

Aug. 27 Joseph A. Camarda 
Elaine Woo 

Sept . 3 Robert Benson 
Christine Howe 

Sept. 3 Benjamin Abbot Ward 
Mary Patricia Daly 



Nashua, N. H. 
Nashua, N. H. 

Beeville, Texas 
Beeville, Texas 

Seattle, Wash. 
Seattle, Wash. 

Sudbury, Mass, 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass* 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass, 
Revere, Mass. 

Portland, Ore, 
Portland, Ore. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Sudbury, Mass. 

« 
New York, N. Y. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Bound Brook, N, J 
Bound Brook, N. J 

Jamestown, R. I. 
Jamestown, R. I. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Framingham, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Concord, Mass. 
Sudbury, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass, 
Lincoln, Mass. 



190 



Date of 
Marriage 



Names 



Residence 



Sept. 4 Steven Poretzky 

Patricia Emily Woo 

Sept. 10 Nicholas R. Francis 
Julia A. Buckler 

Sept. 24 Steven C. Poland 

Gretchen T. Stevenson 

Oct. 1 Richard R. Schreiber 
Rosalind Warner 

Oct. 1 Brian D. McCowan 

Patricia L. Wheeler 

Oct. 1 Henry G. Brzycki 

Elaine J. Tomenendal 

Oct. 8 Rollie B. Merrick 
Marion W. Atchley 

Oct. 15 James L. Rose 
Cheryl Wilfert 

Oct. 22 William H. Ford 
Kathleen A. Yore 

Oct. 29 Timothy Matteson Stephens 
Nancy Jeanne Martini 

Nov. 4 Charles E. Doyle 
Martha J. Rivers 

Nov. 4 Thomas Burge 
Sheila Evans 

Nov. 5 Stuart H. MacFarland 
Nancy Hulett 

Nov. 5 Arthur R. Sabbag 
Lisa Jean DeRosa 

Nov. 20 Russell D. Zaring, Jr. 

Victoria Elizabeth Corby Siek 

Nov. 23 Gerald Frank Jennings 
Kathryn Ann Egan 

Nov. 26 Stanley D. White 
Abbie M. Coffin 



New York, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 

Somerville, Mass, 
Somerville, Mass, 

Ann Arbor, Mich 
Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Philadelphia, Pa, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Waltham, Mass. 
Waltham, Mass. 

Cambridge, Mass. 
Cambridge, Mass. 

Ayer, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Woburn, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Burlington, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Acton, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Duxbury, Vt. 
Waltham, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Sudbury, Mass. 

Stow, Mass. 
Weston, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 



191 



Date of 
Marriage 

Nov. 26 



Dec. 17 



Dec. 28 



Names 



Norbett L. Mintz 
Carol Purdy 

J. Douglas Jenkins 
Kerry Levey 

John Gerald Gillis 
Marsha Taliaferro Will 



Residence 



Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Eagle River, Alaska 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Richmond, Va. 



192 



DEATHS 



Date 


of 


Death 


1982 




Oct. 


22 


Dec. 


2 


Dec. 


3 


1983 




Jan. 


1 


Jan. 


23 


Jan. 


24 


Jan. 


26 


Feb. 


14 


Mar. 


17 


Mar. 


21 


Mar. 


23 


Apr. 


9 


May 


30 


June 


3 


June 


20 


July 


1 


July 


3 


July 


7 


Aug. 


2 


Aug. 


6 


Aug. 


10 


Aug. 


14 


Aug. 


25 


Aug. 


25 


Aug. 


31 


Aug. 


31 


Sept. 


9 


Sept. 


13 


Oct. 


2 


Nov. 


11 


Nov. 


28 


Dec. 


2 


Dec. 


11 


Dec. 


11 


Dec. 


18 



Age 



Name 



Years Months Days 



Sally P. Goss 
Gordon Henry Ogilvie 
Brooke Alexander Miller 



Maryalice Secoy Thoma 
Catherine M. Coan 
Joseph Anthony Vitale 
Rita Maxine Ross 
Marc Michael Gechijian 
Arthur Sabbag 
Mary Smith 
Annis George Asaff 
Francis Joseph Smith 
Margaret E. Patterson 
Miriam Sara Levine 
Mary H. Gradeski 
Frank M. Foreman 
Donald G. Mclnnis, Jr. 
Jane Taylor Moehler 
Talcott M. Banks 
Miriam Chandler 

Myer Z. Kolodney 
Arlene Jeannette Thompson 
Virginia May Wright 
David Sears Murphy 
Emma L. Mix 
Edgar E. Barr 
Carrie-Margaret Alexander 
George Louis Roehr 
Harry A. Vinchesi 
Lydia Louise Butts 
Muriel Macaulay 
Marjorie MacLean 
Linda Marie Conway 
William Paul Kodzis 
Maude H. Konesko 



45 
76 
33 



82 
60 
62 
57 
3 
62 
93 
69 
88 
80 
84 
82 
37 
18 
65 
78 
85 
85 
61 
53 
22 
93 
67 
81 
52 
80 
91 
80 
88 
20 
28 
95 



193 



VALUATION LIST FOR FISCAL 1983-1984 
REAL ESTATE 



— PRIMARY OWNER 



TOTAL 
VALUE 



ABBOTT 

ABBOTT 

ABELE 

ABRAMSON 

ACHTMEYER 

ACKLEY 

ADAMS 

ADAMS 

ADAMS 

ADAMS 

ADAMS 

ADAMS 

ADAMS 

ADAMS 

ADAMS 

ADAMS 

ADAMS 

ADAMS 

ADAMS 

ADAMS 

ADAMS 

ADAMS 

ADAMS 

ADAMS 

ADAMS 

ADAM SON 

AD EL STEIN 

ADELSTEIN 

ADKINS 

ADLER 

ADLER 

ADLER 

ADLER TR 

AHERN 

ALAM 

ALFIERIS 

ALGEO 

ALLEN 

ALLEN 

ALLEN 

ALLEN III 

ALLISON 

ALLISON 

ALLISON 

ALTHAUSEN 

AMES III 

AMES III 

AMMEN 

ANDERSEN 

ANDERSON 

ANDERSON 

ANDERSON 

ANDERSON 

ANDERSON 



JOHN A 

MARGARET G 

BRADFORD L 

DIANA 

WILLIAM F 

WALLACE E 

F DOUGLAS 
GEORGE H 

JOHN 

JOHN £ PETER 
JOHN QUINCY 
JOHN OUINCY 
JOHN QUINCY 
JOHN QUINCY 
JOHN QUINCY 
JOHN QUINCY 
JOHN QUINCY 
JOHN QUINCY 
JOHN QUINCY 
RAMELLE C 

RAMELLE C 

RAMELLE C 

RAMELLE C 

RAMELLE C 

RAMELLE C 

WILLIAM M 

MARY T 

MARY T 

ROBERT H 

HAROLD 
HAROLD 
IVY RUTH 
HAROLD 
MARY JO 
MAHBUB-UL 
MICHAEL 
LEO J 

RICHARD A 

ROBERT L 

WALTER P 

STEPHEN A 

CAROLINE P 

JOHN R 

WILLIAM S 

ALEX F 

ADELBERT 
ADELBERT 
DAVID L 

GRACE A 

CARL L 

FLETCHER N 

LAWRENCE B 

MILDRED D 

SANDRA B 



144,100 
149,500 
274,500 

58,000 
152,100 
400 
146,600 
139,400 
298,000 

10,800 
1,700 

79,900 
7,700 

71,100 
234,200 

57,900 

72,300 

1,900 

155, 30C 

223,100 

64,700 
4,000 

27,200 

40,600 

31,900 

145,100 

3,100 

20,200 
131,400 

12,900 

296,900 

7,500 

172,200 

190,700 

62,400 
128,000 
115,400 
10 5,400 
146,200 
16 3,000 
140,100 

63,200 
145,800 
173,800 
236,100 
207,900 
700 
226,900 
415,70 
134,700 
23 9,300 
179,200 
111,200 
143,700 



TOTAL 
TAX 

2,363,24 
2,451.80 
4,501-80 

951.20 
2,494.44 
6.56 
2,404.24 
2,286.16 
4,887.20 

177.12 

27.88 

1,310.36 

126.28 
1,166.04 
3,840.88 

949.56 
It 185.72 
31.16 
2,546.92 
3,65 8.84 
1,061.08 
65.60 

446.08 

665.84 

523.16 

2,379.64 

50.84 

331.28 
2, 154.96 

211.56 
4,869. 16 

123.00 
2,824.08 
3,127.48 
1,023.36 
2,099.20 
1,892.56 
1,728.56 
2,39 7.68 
2,673.20 
2,297.64 
1,036.48 
2,391.12 
2,850.32 
3,872.04 
3,409.56 
11.48 
3,721.16 
6,817.48 
2,209.08 
3,924.52 
2,938.88 
1,823.68 
2,356.68 



194 



VALUATION LIST FOR FISCAL 198 3-1984 
REAL ESTATE 



— « — — — — — kk i rn 
ANDREWS 


FRANCIS 


S 


ANGELL 


CRAIG 


W 


APPLEYAPD JR 


NORMAN 




APRILLE 


THOMAS 


J 


APMSTRCNG 


C ROBERT 




ARMSTRONG 


JOANNE 


w 


ARNOLD 


WARREN 


H 


ARSHAD 


GULREZ 




ART 


ROBERT 


J 


ASAFF 


ANN IS 


G 


ATCHLEY JR 


DANA 


w 


ATCHLEY JR 


DANA 


W 


AUSTIN 


RICHARD 


c 


AVERY 


ABIGAIL 


D 


BACHRACH JR 


ALAN 




BACON 


HORATIO 


W 


BAGGS JR 


ARTHUR 




BAHCELI 


YASHAR 




BAILEY 


STEPHEN 


K 


BAIRD 


GORDON 


P 


BALDWIN 


JACQUELINE 


L 


BALDWIN 


ROGER 


P 


BALOGH 


KAROLY 




BANKS 


TALCOTT 


M 


BARBAROW 


RUTH 




BARDSLEY 


THEOOORE 


J 


BARE 


BRUCE 


M 


BARKAS 


CHRISTOPHER 


W 


BARKER 


W B 




BARMAKIAN 


FRANK 




BARNABY 


JOHN 


M 


BARNES 


BENJAMIN 


A 


BARNET 


JAMES 


R 


BARR 


EDGAR 


E 


BARRETT 


ALAN 


H 


BARRY 


JON 


T 


BARTOVICS 


WILLIAM 


A 


BARZUN 


ROGER 




BARZUN 


ROGER 




BASILE 


PATRICK 


R 


BASMAJIAN 


VASKEN 




BASSETT 


KENNETH 


E 


BATCHELDER 


ROBERT 


R 


BEAL 


BRUCE 


A 


BEAL 


BRUCE 


A 


BEAL JR 


THOMAS 


P 


BECK 


GARY 


E 


BEENHOUWER 


OWEN 




BELANGER 


MICHAEL 


P 


BELANGER 


WALTER 


E 


BELL 


C GORDON 




BELL 


ROGER 


A 


BELLE 


GENE 




8EMIS 


ANN 


C 



TOTAL 
VALLE 

302,700 
232,200 
160,300 

55,2CC 
171,000 
343,400 
182,100 
292,600 
119,100 
167,000 
196,500 

16,700 
222,200 
172,400 
152,000 
141,200 
141,000 
134,700 
144,200 
235,000 
124,600 
170,700 
223,700 
269,600 

49,400 

79,700 
16 7,300 
118,200 
152,500 

71,500 
131,100 
176, 100 
219,800 
154,200 
134,900 
215,500 
142,800 
279,400 

59,000 
198,400 
156,600 
105,200 
262,500 
276,600 

12,000 
325,000 
135,100 

68,200 

73,100 
109,600 
186,000 
144,000 
122,800 
159,400 



TOTAL 
TAX 

4,964.28 
3,808.08 
2,628.92 

905.28 
2,804.40 
5,631.76 
2,986.44 
4,798.64 
1,953.24 
2,738.80 
3,222.60 

273.88 
3,644.08 
2,827.36 
2,492.80 
2,315.68 
2,312.40 
2,209.08 
2,364.88 
3,854.00 
2,043.44 
2,799.48 
3,668.68 
4,421.44 

810.16 
1,307.08 
2,743.72 
1,938.48 
2,501.00 
1,172.60 
2,150.04 
2,888.04 
3,604.72 
2,528.88 
2,212.36 
3,534.20 
2,341.92 
4,582.16 

967.60 
3,253.76 
2,568.24 
1,725.28 
4,305.00 
4,536.24 

196.80 
5,330.00 
2,215.64 
1,118.48 
1,198.84 
1,797.44 
3,050.40 
2,361.60 
2,013.92 
2,614.16 



195 









VALUATION 


LIS! 


~ — - PRIMARY 


OWNER — - 




BENES 




* ^ = ** 


MICHAEL 


J 


BENNETT 






DORIS 


E 


BENSON 






JOHN 


R 


BENSON 






PETER 


M 


BENTLEY 






BARBARA HYDE 


BENTLEY 






ROBERT 


P 


BENTLEY 






ROBERT 


P 


BENTON 






STEPHEN 


A 


BERENSON 






SHELDON 


J 


BERGEN 






KENNETH 


W 


BERGEN 






KENNETH 


w 


BERGEN 






KENNETH 


w 


BERGER 






RALPH 




BERMAN 






DIANE 


B 


BERMAN 






DONALD 


S 


BERNARD 






CLARK 


L 


BIBRING 






GEORGE 


L 


BICKFORD 






HELEN 


B 


BIENFANG 






DON 


C 


BIKALES 






NORMAN 




BILLINGS 






BRUCE 


H 


BILLINGS 






SARAH 


W 


BIRKETT 






JAMES 


D 


BIRMINGHAM 






JAMES 


G 


BJORK 






ALBION 


P 


BLACK 






EVERETT 


A 


BLACK 






JERRY 


G 


BLACK 






STANLEY 


E 


BLACK 






THOMAS 


E 


BLAIR 






PAUL 


C 


BLANCHARD 






EILENE 




BLOCH 






WILLIAM 


A 


BLOOD 






DAVID 


W 


BOBBITT 






LAKE 


H 


BOCCADORC 






JOSEPH 




BOCKOVEN JOHN 


SANBOURNE 




BOERSNEP WOLFRAM 


A I DORIS 


M 


BOGNER 






WALTER 


F 


BOLT 






RICHARD 


H 


BOLTCN 






DAVID 


W 


BOLTON 






WARREN 


R 


BOMBARA 






JOHN 


J 


BOND 






ROGER 


B 


BOOTH 






ROBERT 


H 


BOOTH 






R08ERT 


H 


BOOTH ALICE 


BURRAGE 




BOOTH ALICE 


BURR AGE 




BOQUIST 






WALLACE 


P 


BOQUIST 






WALLACE 


P 


BORO 






GILBERT 




BORO 






GILBERT 


V 


BORO 






GILBERT 


V 


BOSTON EDISON 


CO 






BOVEY 






MARTIN 


K 



FOR FISCAL 
!EAT. ESTATE 



1983-1984 



TOTAL 

VALUE 

200, 30C 

126,700 

109,400 

118,700 

45,700 

83,600 

206,400 

129,300 

136,900 

311,700 

105,500 

9,600 

153,800 

173,500 

187,500 

218,700 

132,900 

15 5,000 

151,200 

234,000 

10,800 

8,800 

75,70C 

208,700 

175,100 

360,300 

60,000 

56,800 

66,300 

33 5,200 

96,700 

240,200 

100,500 

126,300 

9,200 

133,700 

15 5,400 

171,400 

238^900 

118,700 

14,600 

129,800 

134,200 

27 1,300 

400 

5,200 

800 

170,800 

165,900 

136,100 

87,000 

136,400 

67,200 

167,700 



TOTAL 
TAX 

3,284.92 
2,077.88 
1,794.16 
1,946.68 

749.48 
1,371.04 
3,384.96 
2, 120.52 
2,245.16 
5,111.88 
1,730.20 

15 7.44 
2,522.32 
2,845.40 
3,075.00 
3,586.68 
2,179.56 
2,542.00 
2,479.68 
3,837.60 

177.12 

144.32 
1,241.48 
3,422.68 
2,871.64 
5,908.92 

984.00 

931.52 
1,08 
5,49 
1,585, 
3,939, 
1,648 
2,071 

150. 
2,192 
2,548, 
2,810 
3,917, 

1,946. 
239. 
2,128. 
2,200. 
4,449. 
6, 

85. 

13. 
2,801. 
2,720.76 
2,232.04 
1,426.8( 
2,236.96 
1,102.08 
2,750.21 



196 



VALUATION LIST FOR FISCAL 198 3-1984 
REAL ESTATE 



BOWER 


JOSEPH 


L 


BOWLES 


CLIFFORD 




80YCE 


JAMES 


B 


BOYCE 


MANLEY 


B 


BOYER 


EDWARD 




BOYER 


JOHN 


H 


BOYER 


LOUIS 


L 


BOYER 


MARKLEY 


H 


BOYNTON 


DANIEL 


C 


BRAASCH 


JOHN 


W 


BRADFORD 


ROBERT 


L 


BRADLEE 


BENJAMIN 


C 


BRADLEE III 


HENRY 


G 


BRADLEY 


CLIFFORD 




BRAOLEY 


DAVID 


H 


BRADLEY 


PHILLIP 


H 


BRADY 


ROBERT 


A 


BRAIN 


J WALTER 




BRANDT 


JOHN 


H 


BRANNEN 


ROBERT 


C 


BRAUCHER 


WILLIAM 


M 


BPAUDE 


STEPHEN 


E 


BRAUN 


MORTON 


B 


BRAY 


THOMAS 


P 


BRENNAN 


WILLIAM 


L 


BRIGGS 


DAVID 


L 


BRIGGS 


DAVID 


L 


BRIGHT 


RICHARD 


A 


BR IS SON 


EVELYN 


W 


BRODNEY 


LAWRENCE 




BROGNA 


GERALD 


W 


BR ON SON 


FRANKLIN 


c 


BROOKS 


PAUL 




BROOKS 


PAUL 




BROWER TRUSTEE 


HOWARD 


S 


BROWN 


ELIZABETH 


G 


BROWN 


ELIZABETH 


G 


BROWN 


HERBERT 


L 


BROWN 


JOHN 


B 


BROWN 


ROBERT 


P 


BROWN 


ROBERT 


W 


BROWNE 


SEC OR 


D 


BRUBAKER 


W 


L 


BUCCI 


FRANK 


P 


BUCHAN 


WILLIAM 


R 


BUCHEP 


EDWARD 


A 


BUCKLER 


MARILYN 


L 


BUERGER 


MARTIN 


J 


BUONOPANE 


PAUL 


J 


BURCKETT 


DOUGLAS 


M 


BURK 


GEORGE 


W 


BURK 


GEORGE 


W 


BURK 


RUTH 


M 


BURKE 


RUTH BEMIS 





TOTAL 
VALUE 



TOTAL 
TAX 



237,400 
128,500 

80,500 
126,500 
109,500 
190,200 
125, IOC 
408,300 
100,500 
246,200 
102,200 
139,300 
223,400 

52,300 

300 

162,500 

117,700 

74,900 
237,400 
192,800 
214,200 
284,800 
157, IOC 

65, IOC 
121, 60C 
197,400 
3,200 
201, 70C 
135,800 
203,400 
295,900 
135,100 
211,000 

10,500 

293,200 

1,600 

251,900 

159,800 

73,200 
108,200 

77,600 
159,800 
168,600 
161,100 
117,800 
129,000 
162,900 
210,200 
123,800 
179,700 

92,500 

25,100 
140,800 
239,500 



3,893*36 
2,107.40 
1,320.20 
2,074.60 
1,795.80 
3,119.28 
2,051.64 
6,696.12 
1,648.20 
4,037.68 
1,676.08 
2,284.52 
3,663.76 
857.72 
4.92 
2,665.00 
1,930.28 
1,22 8.36 
3,893.36 
3,161.92 
3,512.88 
4,670.72 
2,576.44 
1,067.64 
1,994.24 
3,237.36 

52.48 
3r307.88 
2,227.12 
3,335.76 
4,852.76 
2,215.64 
3,460.40 
172.20 
4,808.48 

26.24 
4,131.16 
2,620.72 
1,200.48 
1,774.48 
1,272.64 
2,620.72 
2,765.04 
2,642.04 
1,931.92 
2,115.60 
2,671.56 
3,447.28 
2,030.32 
2,947.08 
1,517.00 
411.64 
2,309.12 
3,927.80 



197 



VALUATION 



LIST FOR FISCAL 
REAL ESTATE 



1983-1984 



BURKE JR 

BURNHAM 

BURT 

BURT 

BUSA 

BUSA 

BUSA 

BUSA 

BUSA 

BUSA 

BUSA 

BUSA 

BUSA 

BUSA 

BUSA 

BUTLER 

BUTLER 

BUTTS 

BYE 

BYRNE 

BYRNES 

BYRNES 

CALDWELL 

CALI TRI 

CAMPOBAS 

CANNON 

CANNON 

CANNON 

CANNON 

CANNON 

CANNON 

CANNON R 

CANTLIN 

CANTLIN 

CANTLIN 

CANTU 

CANTU 

CAPPUCCI 

CARAS 

CARAS 

CARLEY 

CARLO 

CARLSON 

CARMAN 

CARMEN 

CARROLL 

CARROLL 

CARROLL 

CARROLL 

CARTER 

CARUSO 

CARVER 

CASILIO 

CASKEY 



PRIMARY OWNER 



WALTER 

ROBERT BOIT 

WILLIAM 

WILLIAM 

FRANK 

FRANK 

FRANK 

FRANK 

FRANK 

FRANK 

FRANK 

FRANK 

FRANK 

FRANK 

FRANK 

WILLIAM 

WILLIAM 

LOUISE 

WILLIS 

BRIAN 

F MICHAEL 

F MICHAEL 

SARAH 

LEON 
SO ANTHONY 

BRADFORD 

BRADFORD 

BRADFORD 

ELLEN DEN 

ELLEN DEN 

ELLEN DEN 
OBERT LAURENT 

ANTOINETTE 

ANTOINETTE 

JOHN 

ROBERT 

ROBERT 

THOMAS 

BYRON 

OPHAIR 

JOHN 

PETER 

CHRISTOPHER 

JOHN 

WILLIAM 

MARJORY 

RICHARD 

RICHARD 
TRUSTEE NANCY 

JOHN 

ROBERT 

JACK 

FRANK 

WALTER 



H 
C 

c 

A 



A 
A 

W 
I 
M 
P 
P 
M 
H 

K 
G 
H 



TOTAL 

VALUE 

150,900 

151, 30C 

300 

155,500 

36,400 

55,000 

5,30C 

62,400 

57,000 

71,000 

62,400 

62,400 

62,400 

50,000 

50,000 

134,700 

129,200 

244,700 

280,800 

64,800 

176,200 

44,000 

220,100 

115,500 

110,300 

24,000 

18,400 

196,900 

41,100 

35,600 

5,000 

139,600 

115,200 

109,500 

26 2,100 

138,000 

6,300 

115,700 

151,600 

120,500 

184,900 

168,400 

133,700 

156,800 

201,400 

93,100 

78,500 

91,400 

90,600 

302,000 

145,500 

121,800 

99,900 

197,200 



TOTAL 
TAX 

2,474.76 

2,481,32 

4,92 

2,550.20 

596.96 

902.00 

86.92 

1,023.36 

934.80 

1,164.40 

1,023.36 

1,023.36 

1,023.36 

820.00 

820.00 

2,209.08 

2,118.88 

4,013.08 

4,605.12 

1,062.72 

2,889.68 

721.60 

3,609.64 

1,894.20 

1,808.92 

393.60 

301.76 

3,229.16 

674.04 

583.84 

82.00 

2,289.44 

1,889.28 

1,795.80 

A, 298. 44 

2,263.20 

103.32 

1,897.48 

2,486.24 

1,976.20 

3,032.36 

2,761.76 

2,192.68 

2,571.52 

3,302.96 

1,526.84 

1,287.40 

1,498.96 

1,485.84 

4,952.80 

2,386.20 

1,997.52 

1,638.36 

3,234.08 



198 



VALUATION 



LIST FOR FISCAL 
REAL ESTATE 



1983-1984 



PRIMARY OWNER 



TOTAL 
VALUE 



CASSIOY HENRY 

CASSIDY ROBERT 

CASSIDY VERNA 

CASWELL JOHN ROSS 

CHAET ROBERT 

CHALILPOYIL PURUSH 

CHAMPENY JOHN 

CHAMPENY JOHN 

CHAMPENY JOHN 

CHAMPION JR CRAIG 

CHAN DAVID C W 

CHAN VINCENT 

CHAP IN BERTHA 

CHAP IN BERTHA 

CHAPIN MARGARET 

CHAPLIN PETER 

CHASE BARBARA 

CHASE IRVING 

CHASE IRVING 

CHEN SOW-HSIN 

CHERNIACK JEROME R £ ELIZ I 
CHIGAS DIANNE WASLEY 
DIANNE WASLEY 
DIANNE WASLEY 
DIANNE WASLEY 

JOSEPH 



CHIGAS 

CHIGAS 

CHIGAS 

CHIN 

CHIOTELIS 

CHIPMAN 

CHISHOLM 

CHISHOLM 

CHOPRA 

CHOU 

CHRISTENSEN 

CHU 

CHU 

CHUAN 

CHURCH 

CIAMPI 

CIARAMAGLIA 

CIBEL 

CIRASO 

CLARK 

CLARKE 

CLEARY 

COAN 

COANE 

CO BURN 

COFFIN 

COHEN 

COLE 

COLE 

COLEMAN 

COLLINS 

COLLINS 



ESTATE OF 



CHARLES 

ROBERT 

EDWARD 

JAMES 

DEEPAK 

HARRY H S 

RONALD 

CHAUNCY 

GE YAO 

MARIAN 

ROBERT 

MARY 

FREDERICK 

STANLEY 

ANNE 

CLIFFORD 

JAMES 

MICHAEL 

THOMAS 

AMOLIA 

EDWARD 

STEWART 

JACQUES 

EDWIN 

HUGH 

MARY MURRAY 

DONALD 

LAURENCE 



J 

E 
E 

B 



C 
C 

w 
w 

L 
L 
E 
G 
S 



B 

L 
H 
C 
P 



K 
T 
P 
J 
A 

A 
R 
P 



S 

T 

M 



10,200 
95,600 
69,700 
159,600 
128,700 
111,400 
164,400 
27,600 
237,200 
163,400 
152,700 
148,700 
163,000 
129,800 
11 1, 100 
157,900 
105, 50C 
23,900 
268,500 
3 8,400 
106,900 
800 
800 
116,500 
36,700 
133,000 
175,300 
113,100 
111,300 
168,100 
279,500 
150,100 
177,900 
170,200 
231,000 
149,40 
182,600 
132,900 
190,200 
110,200 
155,900 
182,300 
172,800 
112,500 
81,400 
52,300 
119,500 
120,900 
158,700 
148,700 
280,900 
176,500 
195,800 
142,900 



TOTAL 
TAX 

167.28 
1,567,84 
1,143.08 
2,617.44 
2,110.68 
1,826.96 
2,696.16 

452.64 
3,890.08 
2,679.76 
2,504.28 
2,438.68 
2,673.20 
2,128.72 
1,822.04 
2,589.56 
1,730.20 

391.96 
4,403.40 

629.76 

1,753.16 

13.12 

13.12 

1,910.60 

601.88 
2, 181.20 
2,874.92 
1,854.84 
1,825.32 
2,756.84 
4,533. 80 
2,461.64 
2,917.56 
2,791.28 
3,786.40 
2,450.16 
2,994.64 
2,179.56 
3,119.28 
1,807.28 
2,556.76 
2,989.72 
2,833.92 
1,845.00 
1,334.96 

857.72 
1,959.80 
1,962.76 
2,602.68 
2,438.68 
4,606.76 
2,894.60 
3,211.12 
2,343.56 



199 



VALUATION LIST FOR FISCAL 1983-1984 
REAL ESTATE 



PRIMARY OWNER 



COLLINS 

COMJEAN 

COMJEAN 

COMO 

COMSTOCK 

CONE JR 

CONLEY 

CONNOLLY 

CONNOLLY 

CONNOLLY 

CONRAD P £ BRADS 

CONROY 

CONSTABLE 

CONSTANTINE 

COOK 

COOK JR 

COOLIDGE 

COONS 

COOPER 

COOPER 

COPE 

COPELAND 

COPPQLINC 

CORCORAN 

CORMACK 

COPRIGAN 

CORTESE 

COTOIA 

COTOIA 

COTOIA 

COTOIA ANTHONY J 

COTOIA ANTHONY J 

CO TON I 

COUNTRYSIDE CONT 

COURTNEY 

COUSINS EST OF L 

COWLES 

CRAIG 

CRAIG JR 

CRANDALL 

CRAWFORD 

CRETELLA 

CROOK 

CROWE 

CULVER 

CULVER 

CULVER 

CUMMINGS 

CUNNINGHAM 

CUNNINGHAM 

CUNNINGHAM 

CUNNINGHAM 

CURTIS 

CUTTER 



MARGERY P 

BRUCE P 

MARC G 

FLORENCE J 

CHARLES B 

THOMAS £ 

DAVID P 

DAVID J 
J IRVING 
J IRVING 

HAW Y 

GRACE W 

KATHERINE M 

KATHERINE P 

JACQUELINE H 

PAUL W 

HENRY P 

RICHARD D 

AMI EL G 
E CRAWLEY 

ELIZABETH W 

CHARLES L 

MICHAEL J 

ROBERT P 

ALLAN M 
MARY 

ANTHONY D 

ANTHONY J 

LUCY M 
LUCY MARY AN 
£ LUCY M 
£ LUCY M 
JOSEPH 

EMPORIES INC 
JOS DONALD 

AWRENCE B 
ADDISON 

ROBERT W 

STANLEY R 

STEPHEN H 

JOHN D 

HENRY A 

CONSTANCE S 

MARY B 

PERRY J 

PERRY J 

PERRY J 

WILLIAM R 
J LEWIS 

J AM ES F 

ROBERT M 
ROBERT ALLEN 

STANLEY P 

ROBERT A 



TOTAL 
VALUE 

187,100 

210,900 

151,700 

120,300 

124,800 

184,300 

68,000 

10,000 

121,700 

200,500 

163,500 

81,900 

123,600 

120,700 

112,400 

221,700 

220,600 

258,300 

195,600 

163,500 

132,400 

170,700 

88,900 

152,900 

17,600 

91,70C 

217,400 

166,500 

89,300 

67,900 

12,800 

12,800 

12 2,100 

54,200 

103,600 

131,600 

108,000 

137,700 

169,400 

202,900 

183,900 

274,600 

100,300 

175.00C 

33,600 

273,600 

15,200 

112,300 

142,500 

93,100 

105,400 

182,500 

127,300 

169,000 





T01 


rAL 




TAX 


3i 


,068, 


.44 


3, 


,45 8,76 


2, 


,487, 


.88 


h 


,972, 


,92 


2, 


,046, 


.72 


3, 


,022, 


.52 


It 


r 115. 


.20 




164, 


.00 


It 


,995, 


,88 


3i 


288, 


.20 


2, 


,681, 


,40 


li 


,343, 


,16 


2, 


027, 


,04 


li 


,979, 


.48 


li 


,843, 


,36 


3, 


,635, 


,88 


3i 


,617, 


,84 


4i 


,236. 


,12 


3, 


207, 


,84 


2, 


,681, 


,40 


2, 


171, 


,36 


2, 


799, 


,48 


li 


,457, 


,96 


2, 


507, 


,56 




288, 


,64 
,88 


It 


533, 


3, 


565, 


,36 


2, 


,730, 


60 


1, 


464. 


52 


li 


113, 


,56 




209, 


92 




209, 


,92 


2, 


002, 


,44 




888. 


88 


1, 


699, 


,04 


2i 


158. 


24 


li 


771. 


20 


2, 


,258, 


,28 


2, 


,778. 


16 


3, 


327. 


,56 


3, 


015, 


,96 


4, 


,503. 


44 


It 


644. 


,92 


2, 


,870. 


,00 




551. 


04 


4i 


487. 


,04 




249. 


28 


1, 


841. 


72 


2, 


337. 


,00 


1, 


526. 


84 


1, 


728. 


56 


2, 


993. 


00 


2, 


087. 


72 


2, 


771. 


60 



200 



VALUATION LIST FOR FISCAL 1983-1984 
REAL ESTATE 



. PRIMARY OWNER 



TOTAL 
VALUE 



DACOSTA 

DALLOS 

DALRYMPLE 

DALRYMPLE 

DALRYMPLE 

OALRYMPLE 

DAMICO 

DAM I CO 

DAMICO 

DAMICO 

DAMICO 

DAMICO JR , 

DAMICO JP 

DAMON 

DANE 

DANE 

DANE BENJAMIN & 

DANIELS 

DANOSKY 

DARLING 

DARLING JR 

DARMAN 

DARR IGO BROTHER 

DARRIGC BROTHER 

DARRIGC BROTHER 

DARR IGO BROTHER 

DAUTREMONT 

DAUTREMONT 

DAVIDSON 

DAVIS 

DAVIS 

DAVIS 

DAVIS 

DAVIS 

DAVIS 

DAVIS 

DAVIS 

DAVIS 

DAVIS 

DAVIS 

DA\/lS 

DAVY 

DAWES 

DE LA PENA 

DEAN 

DEAN 

DEAN 

DEBARYSHE 

DECISNERCS 

DEDELL 

DEGUGLIELMO 

DE JESUS 

DELIA 

DELORI 



DAVID GOMES 
ANDRAS 
CHESTER 

SIDNEY C 

SIDNEY C 

SIDNEY C 
; LOUISE 
LOUISE 

RALPH P 

RALPH P 

RALPH P 

RALPH P 

RALPH P 
J GILBERT 
ROGER 
ROGER 
ALEXANDRA C 

BRUCE G 

MARY C 
LEONARD 

EUGENE M 

RICHARD G 

S CO OF 

S CO OF 

S COMPANY OF 

S COMPANY OF 

CHESTER C 

CHESTER C 

ROBERT W 

PRESCOTT L 

PRE SCOTT L 

PRESCOTT L 

RONALD C 

SHERMAN P 

SHERMAN P 

SHERMAN P 

SHERMAN P 

SHERMAN P 

SHERMAN P 

SHERMAN P 

WILLIAM A 

LOUISE W 

DONALD L 
MIGUEL 

LOUIS W 

ROBERT L 

WILLIAM M 
PAUL 

MARIA H 

HARRY C 

FLORENCE T 
JOHN 

JOHN A 

FRANCOIS C 



328,100 

108,500 

242,000 

204,500 

29,700 

8,800 

91,600 

10,600 

56,200 

78,800 

59,300 

300 

59,700 

135,900 

382,200 

3,800 

358,500 

292,700 

97,80C 

164,000 

153,400 

170,300 

22,000 

9,900 

16,900 

17,900 

245, 100 

334,500 

82,200 

120,000 

1,600 

11,200 

115,700 

24,400 

2,500 

144,800 

24,300 

2 7,800 

92,500 

96,000 

144,200 

153,300 

142,100 

140,000 

900 

80,200 

112,700 

136,600 

167,000 

128,600 

300 

179,900 

186,300 

152,800 



TOTAL 
TAX 

5,380.84 

1,779.40 

3,968.80 

3,353.80 

487.08 

144.32 

1,502.24 

173.84 

921.68 

1,292.32 

972.52 

4.92 

979.08 

2,228.76 

6,268.08 

62.32 

5,879.40 

4,800.28 

1,603.92 

2,689.60 

2,515.76 

2,792.92 

360.80 

162.36 

277.16 

293.56 

4,019.64 

5,485.80 

1,348.08 

1,968.00 

26.24 

183.68 

1,897.48 

400.16 

41.00 

2,374.72 

398.52 

455.92 

1,517.00 

1,574.40 

2,364. 88 

2,514.12 

2,330.44 

2,296.00 

14.76 

1,315.2 8 

1,848.28 

2,240.24 

2,738.80 

2,109.04 

4.92 

2,950.36 

3,055.32 

2,505.92 



201 



VALUATION LIST FOR FISCAL 
REAL ESTATE 



— =. PRIMARY 

DELOR1 


OWNER — 

ROSAMOND 


P 


DENEHY 


EDWARD 


J 


denem 


EDWARD 


J 


DEN1 SON 


MARY SMITH 




DENORNANDIE 


ALICE 


w 


DE NORM AND IE 


ALICE 


w 


DENORNANDIE 


ALICE 


w 


DENG RNANOIE 


JAMES 




OENQRH ANO IE 


J AM ES 




QEN0RMANCIE 


JAMES 




DENORNANDIE 


JAMES 




DENORMANCIE 


JAMES 




DENORNANDIE 


JA y :ES 




DEN-OR w ANCIE 


iJ iRTHA 




eenermandie 


PHI LI P 




DE N E P N A N D I E 


PHI LI P 


Y 


DENQRHANDIE 


PHILIP 


Y 


:e\: = '^ i ^ie 


PHI LIP 


Y 


DENORMANCIE 


z E3ERT 


L 


DENORMANCIE 


THOMAS 




:e\: ; '' '',cie 


THOMAS 


L 


DESCR'-'ANCIE THG« 


AS L6KCV 




DENORNDIE 


THOMAS 


L 


DERBYSHIRE 


HELEN 


L 


DESAI 


SANIR 


A 


:e :: jGnets 


ARCHER 


B 


DETERL ING j^ 


RALPH 


A 


DEWEY 


EDWARD 




DE*EY 


EDnARD 


S 


Ir^EY 


EDWARD 


s 


:exte = 


BARBARA 


c 


dex'e-. 


3ARBARA 


c 


: : ab 


CONSTANCE 




:: : : i .a ccnst inc 






: : "<ey 


: UNA 


H 


DICKIE 


RIC"A=D 


I 


91 GIOVANNI 


GUY 


P 


DIGIOVANI : 


3JY 


P 


DILG 


GILES 




DILLHAN 


DOUGLAS 


s 


DILLON 


J EAV, E 


L 


dine=s t e: ' 


GORDC\ 




DITORG 


MICHAEL 


H 


DIXON 


RUSSELL 


J 


Dl CON TRLSTEE 


MILBURN 


J 


ED-E-TY 


J ' -' E S 


H 


DOHEPTY 


JAMES 


H 


DOHEf TY 


*ILLIAM 


R 


DOHERTY 


« I L L I - - 


R 


DOHERTY S BAR iSE 


[NC 




DC _ : '.SKY 


LA? fl • 


R 


DONEN IChELLA 


C IEN IC 




:: j :mc-iella 


DIME', IC 




DONEN ICHELLA 


:. E-ENIC 





1983-1984 


TOTAL 


VALUE 


25, 


,40C 


19, 


,800 


169, 


,400 


252, 


.300 


122, 


,900 


60, 


,ooc 


71, 


,900 




400 




500 




400 




IOC 




40 




400 


306, 


,40C 


—^ t 


,400 


39, 


,900 


46, 


,90C 


40, 


,000 


218, 


, IOC 


52i 


, 5CC 


8, 


,800 


6, 


,70C 


75, 


,00C 




300 


79, 


,50C 


237, 


,800 


196, 


,900 


153, 


,60C 


271, 


,500 


15, 


,00C 


1, 


,100 


23 6, 


,800 


35 5, 


,3CC 


141, 


,000 


69, 


,300 


115, 


.500 


78, 


,500 


73, 


,30C 


182, 


,40C 


13 5. 


rlOC 


10 9, 


,4CC 


15 8, 


, 100 


126, 


,000 


120, 


,60C 


16, 


,000 


99, 


>30C 


45, 


,00C 


116, 


,300 


103, 


,500 


251, 


,300 


12 2, 


,600 


17, 


,30C 


6, 


,100 


10, 


,800 



TOTAL 
TAX 

416.56 

324,72 

2,778.16 

4,137.72 

2,015.56 

984.00 

1, 179.16 

6.56 

8.20 

6.56 

1.64 

6.56 

6.56 

5,024.96 

88.56 

654.36 

769.16 

656.00 

3,576.84 

861.00 

144.32 

109.88 

1,230.00 

4.92 

1,303.80 

3,899.92 

3,229.16 

2,519.04 

4,452.60 

246.00 

18.04 

3,883.52 

5,826.92 

2,312.40 

1,464.52 

1,894.20 

1,287.40 

1,202.12 

2,991.36 

2,215.64 

1,794.16 

2, 592.84 

2,066.40 

1,977.84 

262.40 

1,628.52 

738.00 

1,907.32 

1,697.40 

4, 121.32 

2,013.92 

283.72 

100.04 

177.12 



\ 



202 



VALUATION LIST FOR FISCAL 1983-19 
?I-_L ESTATE 





UrfNfcK 




DONENICHELLA JR 


FRANK 


A 


D^ M ENICHELLA J = 


FRi 


A 


.'^ENICHLLA JR 


fp: 


A 


DGNALD 


9A V ID 


H 


DGNALD DAVID HERBERT 




DONALDSON 


ASTRID 


L 


DONALDSON 


CHARLOTTE 


L 


• ALDSON 


CHARLOTTE 


L 


DONA _DSGN 


CHARLOTTE 


L 


OONALDSC 1 - 


CHARLOTTE 


L 


DONALOSOft 


CHARLOTTE 


L 


DONALOSON 


CHARLOTTE 


L 


D0NALD5GN 


DA, 


M 


DONALDSON 


DAVID 


* 


dgnalis: 1 . 


DA. 


M 


DONALDSON 


GORDON 


A 


,ALDSCN 


GORDON 


A 


DONALDS" 


JONATHAN 


D 


Donaldson 


"ALCOLM 


L 


DONALDSON 


MALCOLM 


L 


unaldson 


MALCOLM 


L 


DONALDSON EXECUTRASTRI D L 




DONALDSON TRJST 


DONALD 


? 


: : \nell 


MARION 


L 


DCNOVAN 


ANDREW 


E 


CCNCVAN 


OONNA 


* 


DONOVAN 


LEO 


A 


DCOLEY J^ 


T nC«A5 


J 


DCCLEv Jk 


T-KDMAS 


J 


:::ley jp 


THOMAS 


J 


DCCLEY JR 


THDMAS 


J 


DOOLEY J« 


THOMAS 


J 


DGGLEY J? 


THOMAS 


J 


DORIAN 


-AJL 


J 


DOUGHERTY 


ALLEN 


; 


DOUGHTY 


JOSEPH 


M 


DOWNEY JR 


EDWARD 


F 


DOWNS 


ELAINE 


R 


::*se 


LEONARD 


H 


DRAGO 


NIC t« LAS 


* 


DRAKE 


LILLIAN 


W 


DRANE 


DOUGLAS 




m ine 


DOUGLAS 




DREI SEif- 


TIN0TH1 


A 


DREISBACti 


TI y DT~Y 


- 


DREW 


FREDERIC 


T 


DRISCOLL 


: - N I e l 


F 


DUANE 


NEIL 


F 


DUANE 


NEIL 


F 


DUBOIS 


OLIVE 


S 


oleics 


3 E 1 R 3 E 


F 


DUFFY III 


JAMES 


E 


DURSO 


MURIEL 


I 


DUST IN 


DANIEL 


E 



TOTAL 


TOTAL 


.- _ .E 


Ii 1 


8,60C 


141.04 


9 7.40C 


1,597.36 


60C 


9. M 


77,30C 


1,275.92 


20 3,3GC 


3,2S4.92 


161,000 


2,640.40 


65,00C 


1,066.00 


3,00C 


49. 


1,00C 


16.40 


4 , : : : 


65.60 


4,000 


::.:: 


7,30C 


114.80 


140, 23C 


2,299.23 


273,100 


A, 42 9. 64 


e , ^ : : 


137.76 


25 4, 50C 


4,173. 60 


: 2 z , - ■ 


2 , 09 7 . c - 


16 6, 40 C 


2,72 3.96 


145, ODC 


2,37 5 . DC 


163, 20C 


2,676.48 


1, DOC 


. e . - : 


300 


-. 92 


90 : 


14. 7o 


173.-:: 


2,351. 'z 


157,700 


2,586.28 


127, 60C 


2,392.6- 


26 2 , : : : 


4,296. 2 : 


l : . - * : 


195.16 


13. 5 ] : 


221.40 


2.00C 


21 . : ' 


: :, 7oc 


339.-2 


21,2: : 


347. z I 


15, 10c 


1-7.64 


144, 70C 


2.373.08 


5 2, 500 


1,353.:: 


91.400 


1,498.96 


113, 1GC 


1, f :-. 3-* 


174,1:: 


2, :5 2 . z : 


18 , 60 C 


2, 9= 1 . 2- 


I69 v 90€ 


c , 7c z . 1 z 


5 :,90C 


1.326. It 


15 5.40C 


2 ■ : 2 9 . 76 


315, =: : 


5,175. M 


203,500 


3,337.40 


it,-:: 


277.16 


84,300 


..2 5 2.52 


26 i , 5:0 


4,2<53.52 


= ,:: : 




111,::: 


1,620.40 


79.5:: 


1.303.60 


15 ; . 5 : : 


2,571. zl 


28 7 • 90 II 


-,721.56 


125, 7GC 


2 , 1 1 1 . r 2 


13 2 , 1 : : 


2, 166. 44 



VALUATION LIST FOR FISCAL 1983-1984 
REAL ESTATE 



~ ~ — — PRIMARY 


OWNER ■ 




DYER 


CHERYL 


M 


EASTMENT 


JEFFREY 


T 


BATON 


JEFFERSON 


T 


EATON 


JEFFERSON 


T 


ECKHARDT 


HOMER 


D 


ELDER 


GEORGE 


D 


ELKUS 


HOWARD 


F 


ELLIOTT 


WILLIAM 


G 


ELLIS 


ELOISE 


G 


ELLIS JR 


ALEXANDER 




ELWELL 


MARY 


M 


ELWOOD 


DAVID 


M 


EMERSON 


CLAIRE 


G 


EMERSON 


WILLIAM 




EMERY 


ALICE 


W 


EMERY 


MARY 


B 


EMMONS 


A 8RADLEE 




ENGLAND 


ALBERT 




ENGLAND 


ALBERT 


E 


EPPLING 


FREDERIC 


J 


ERIC SON 


HERBERT 


E 


ESHLEMAN 


DEAN 


B 


EVANGELISTA 


FLORENZO 


T 


EVANS 


LUCIUS 


W 


FADDOUL 


GEORGE 


P 


FAIRBANKS 


ALAN 


R 


FALENDER 


ANDREW 


J 


FARAN 


JAMES 


J 


FARGO 


SUSAN 


C 


FARGO JP 


FOSTER 


M 


FARNY 


MICHAEL 


H 


FARRELL 


PHILIP 


J 


FEENEY 


JAMES 


H 


FEGLEY 


H WILLIAM 




FEINBERG 


BERNICE 




FEINBERG 


NEIL 




FEIR 


HENRY 


I 


FELDMAN 


ROGER 


D 


FELEGI AN 


PETER 




FELIX 


JAMES 


E 


FENIJN 


CHRIS 


J 


FENTON 


TERENCE 




FERNALD JR 


GEORGE 


H 


FERR I 


EDWARD 


J 


FERPO 


ARM AND 


F 


F INLAY 


ALLAN 


R 


FINNEGAN 


LAWRENCE 


M 


FINNEPTY 


JAMES 


J 


FINNERTY 


RICHARD 


E 


FINNEY 


ROSS 


L 


FINSMITH 


IRENE 


D 


FIORELLI 


ERNEST 


R 


FISCALE TRUSTEE 


JOSEPH 




FISHEP 


JOHN 


W 



TOTAL 
VALUE 



201,900 
200,800 
100,000 
224,300 
137,800 
141,900 
197,700 
241,400 
250,500 
338,600 
162,200 
107,300 

99,200 
153, 90C 
145,300 
140,100 
224,600 
5,500 
243,300 
117,500 
148,700 

86,900 

77,700 
330,000 
121,300 
400 
184,100 
214,100 

60,000 
121, 80G 

99,500 
132,900 
147,300 
374,200 

23,800 
101,900 

52,700 
164,800 
133,300 
123,100 
129,900 

72,700 
261,800 
132,000 

98,000 
141,900 
100,000 

99,000 
199,600 
200,100 
197,000 
143,900 
127,200 
148,600 





TOTAL 




TAX 


3, 


311, 


,16 


3, 


293, 


,12 


li 


640. 


00 


3, 


678, 


,52 


2, 


259, 


,92 


2, 


327. 


16 


3, 


242, 


,28 


3, 


.958. 


96 


4, 


108. 


,20 


5, 


553, 


,04 


2, 


660. 


,08 


li 


759. 


,72 


It 


,626, 


,88 


2, 


523. 


96 


2, 


382, 


,92 


2, 


297. 


,64 


3, 


683. 


,44 




90, 


,20 


3, 


990. 


,12 


It 


927, 


,00 


2, 


438, 


,68 


li 


.425. 


16 


It 


274. 


,28 


5i 


412. 


,00 


li 


989. 


32 




6, 


,56 


3, 


019, 


24 


3, 


511. 


24 




984, 


,00 


It 


997. 


52 


It 


631. 


,80 


2, 


179, 


,56 


2, 


415, 


72 


6, 


136, 


,88 




390. 


32 


It 


671. 


16 




864, 


,28 


2, 


702. 


72 


2, 


186. 


,12 


2, 


018, 


,84 


2, 


130, 


,36 


It 


192, 


,28 


4, 


29 3, 


,52 


2, 


164. 


80 


It 


607. 


,20 


2, 


327. 


16 


It 


640. 


00 


It 


623. 


,60 


2, 


273. 


44 


3t 


281. 


64 


3t 


230. 


80 


2, 


359. 


96 


2, 


086, 


08 


2, 


437. 


04 



204 



VALUATION LIST FOR FISCAL 
REAL ESTATE 



1983-1984 





<Y UWNfcK — *■ — - 




FITTS 


GERTRUDE 


W 


FITZGERALD 


DEREK 


J 


FITZGERALD 


JOHN 


H 


FLANNERY 


CONSTANCE 


H 


FLANNERY 


DONALD 


J 


FLANSBUFGH 


EARL 


R 


FLINT 


EPHRAIM 


B 


FLINT 


EUGENIA 


N 


FLINT 


GEORGE 


B 


FLINT 


JONATHAN 


A 


FLINT 


MARGARET 


S 


FLINT 


PETER 




FLINT 


ROBERT 


M 


FLINT 


WARREN 


F 


FLINT 


WARREN 


F 


FLINT EDWARD F 


& HENRY R 




FLINT EDWARD F 


& HENRY R 




FLINT EDfcARO F 


£ HENRY R 




FLINT JR 


WARREN 


F 


FLOYD 


OLIVE 


B 


FLYNN 


WILLIAM 




FOLEY 


JOHN 


F 


FORD II 


DAVID 




FORMAN 


ALBERT 


J 


FOSTER 


GERALD 


L 


FOSTER 


J EDWARD 




FOWLKES EXECUTRIXMARION 


L 


FRANCIS 


HENRY 


A 


FRANK 


ROBERT 


C 


FRANKLIN 


J THOMAS 




ERASER 


DON AL D 


C 


FRASER 


ROBERT 


M 


FRAZIER 


MICHAEL 




FREDA 


WARREN 


J 


FREED 


CHARLES 




FRENCH 


JOHN 


B 


FRIEL 


PATRICK 


J 


FROST 


WESLEY 


T 


FULLERTON JR 


ALBERT 


L 


FUNG 


MARGARET 




FUSILLO 


MICHAEL 


G 


GABLE 


BRUCE KENT 




GABOVITCH 


WILLIAM 




GAGNE 


LAWRENCE 


E 


GAILEY 


TIMOTHY 


H 


GALLITANO 


ALPHONSE 


L 


GALLITANO 


ALPHONSE 


L 


GALLITANC LEO £ ALPHONSE 




GANNETT 


ANN 


C 


GANNETT 


ANN 


C 


GARDENT JR 


PAUL 


E 


GARGILL 


ROBERT 


M 


GARGILL 


ROBERT 


M 


GARNER 


ROBERT 


N 



TOTAL 
VALUE 

251,900 
108,500 
128,700 
159,500 

68,400 

199,200 

3,700 

167,600 

98,200 

162,500 

157,200 

108,600 

1,300 

20,200 
2,600 

13,300 
108,700 
5,00C 
184,100 
135,900 
181,800 
115,100 
293,500 

88,000 
118,400 
153,100 

58,300 
119,100 
253,700 
246,500 
221,100 
125,800 

66,900 
4,000 
154,100 
268,000 
218,900 
117,700 
187,700 

44,000 
231,800 
152,200 
173,800 
172,200 
139,300 
327,500 
3,600 
175,800 
287,600 
400 
163,900 
263,300 

73,900 
146,500 



TOTAL 
TAX 

4,131.16 
1,779.40 
2,110.68 
2,615.80 
1,121.76 
3,266.88 

60.68 
2,748.64 
1,610.48 
2,665.00 
2,578.08 
1,781.04 

21.32 
331.28 

42.64 

218.12 

1,782.68 

82.00 
3,019.24 
2,228.76 
2,981.52 
1,887.64 
4,813.40 
1,443.20 
1 , 94 1 . 76 
2,510.84 
956.12 
1,953.24 
4,160.68 
4,042.60 
3,626.04 
2,063.12 
1,097.16 

65.60 
2,527.24 
4,395.20 
3,589.96 
1,930.28 
3,078.28 
721.60 
3,801.52 
2,496.08 
2,850.32 
2,824.08 
2,284.52 
5,371.00 

59.04 
2,883. 12 
4,716.64 
6.56 
2,687.96 
4,318.12 
1,211.96 
2,402.60 



205 



VALUATION LIST FOR FISCAL 1983-1984 
REAL ESTATE 



— — PRIMARY OWNER 

GARRETT PRITCHARD 


S 


GARRISON 


DAVID 


L 


GARRISON 


JOHN 


B 


GARSIOE 


ALICE 


H 


GARTH 


JOHN 


C 


GARY 


MAI DA 


E 


GATCHELL JR 


G GORDON 




GAUVIN 


GREGORY 


P 


GAVRIN 


EOWARD 


S 


GEBERT 


ANNA 


V 


GECHIJIAN 


ARA 


K 


GEER 


CHARLES 


L 


GENTILE 


JOSEPH 


F 


GERSON 


NATHANIEL 


C 


GERSON 


OR IN 


D 


GHEITH 


MOHAMED 


A 


GIESE 


PAUL 


E 


GILFOY 


DONALD 


A 


GILLIS 


JOHN 


G 


GILMORE 


PETER 


J 


GIURLEO 


JAMES 


M 


GLASS 


JOHN 


B 


GLEASON 


NANCY W J 




GLEASON 


NANCY W J 




GOOOARO 


RICHARD 


B 


GOLDBERG 


JEFFREY 




GOLDEN 


SYLVIA 


H 


GOLDLUST 


JERRY 


A 


GOODRICH 


JOHN 


C 


GORDON 


DORIS 


s 


GORDON 


LESTER 


I 


GOULD 


NADJA 


B 


GOUNARIS 


THOMAS 


X 


GPABILL 


MARTHA 


L 


GRABILL 


MARTHA 


L 


GR ADDIS 


RICHARD 


D 


GRAF 


MALCOLM 




GRAHAM 


JACK 


I 


GRANDE 


ORLANDO 


S 


GRAS 


RANULF 


w 


GRASON 


RUFUS 


L 


GRAZIOSI 


JOSEPH 




GREAVES 


ALLAN 


W 


GREELEY 


JAMES 


M 


GREEN 


LAURENCE 


H 


GREEN 


ROBERT 


T 


GREENBERG 


SANDRA 


L 


GREENBEPGER 


JOEL 


S 


GREER 


GORDON 


B 


GREESON 


JOSEPH 


B 


GRIGGS 


ANNETTE 


M 


GRIGLIK CASMIR 


JR & PATRICE 


A 


GRIM JR 


WILLIAM 


M 


GPINNELL 


WILLIAM 


L 



TOTAL 
VALUE 

223,800 
143,500 
201,400 
131,400 
122,000 
136,000 
113,500 
141,600 
182,700 
154,600 

2,000 
418,300 
103,800 
152,400 
83,500 
93,000 
132,600 
169,200 
208,900 
13 1,100 

6,100 
132,200 
205,500 

3,400 

85,800 
250,000 
136,400 

94,500 
191,100 
18 0,100 
135, 60C 
118,900 
137,700 
218,000 

16,900 
3,100 

77,600 
229,400 
201,200 
148,600 
138,300 
225,900 
111,400 
150,800 
140,600 
251,000 
166,600 
134,300 
17 6,500 
318,900 
17 5,100 
131,500 
115,700 
150,000 



TOTAL 
TAX 

3,670,32 
2,353.40 
3,302.96 
2,154.96 
2,000.80 
2,230.40 
1,861.40 
2,322.24 
2,996.28 
2,535.44 

32.80 
6,860.12 
1,702.32 
2,499.36 
1,369.40 
1,525.20 
2,174.64 
2,774.88 
3,425.96 
2,150.04 
100.04 
2,168.08 
3,370.20 

55.76 
1,407.12 
4,100.00 
2,236.96 
1, 549.80 
3,134.04 
2,953.64 
2,223.84 
1,949.96 
2,258.28 
3,575.20 
277.16 

50.84 
1,272.64 
3,762.16 
3,299.68 
2,437.04 
2,268.12 
3,704.76 
1,826.96 
2,473.12 
2,305.84 
4,116.40 
2,732.24 
2,202.52 
2,894.60 
5,229.96 
2 , 87 1 . 64 
2,156.60 
1,897.48 
2,460.00 



206 



VALUATION LIST FOR FISCAL 1983-1984 
REAL ESTATE 



— PRIMARY 


OWNER 


.*» aw 


GROBLESKI 


TIMOTHY 


J 


GROSS 


THOMAS A 




GROVER 


C STUART 




GROVES 


ALLAN 


M 


GUAR I NO 


GUY 


E 


GUDZINOWICZ 


MARY 


M 


GULDBERG 


PETER 


A 


GULDBERG 


PETER 


H 


GUMMERE 


JOHN 


L 


GURLEY 


ELIZABETH 


J 


GURSKI 


RICHARD 


J 


GUSTAFSON 


J KENNETH 




GUSTAVSON 


GLENN 





GUTHKE 


KARL 


s 


GUY 


DONALD 


c 


GYFTOPOULOS 


ELIAS 


p 


H B KNOWLES INC 






HAARTZ 


BEATRICE 


R 


HACHIKIAN 


KENNETH 


V 


HADCOCK 


PETER 


w 


HADLEY 


HENRY 


H 


HADLOCK 


CHARLES 


R 


HAESSLER 


DIANE 


F 


HAGER 


MICHAEL 


W 


HAGGERTY 


JOHN 


s 


HAGGERTY 


NANCY 


L 


HAGMANN 


OTTO 




HAGMANN 


OTTO 




HALES 


CHARLES 


A 


HALL 


NANCY 


M 


HAMILTON 


HARRY 


A 


HAMILTON 


WILLIAM 


H 


HAMILTON 


WILLIAM 


L 


HAMMOND 


JOHN 


S 


HAMMOND III 


JOHN 


S 


HAMMOND III 


JOHN 


s 


HANANIA 


BARBARA 


M 


HANCOCK 


JOHN 


c 


HANKEY 


FRANCIS 


w 


HANSEN 


KENT 


F 


HANSEN 


RALPH 


H 


HANSEN JR 


C RUSSELL 




HANSON 


ADLER 


M 


HANSON 


ELNA 


P 


HAPGOOD JR 


NORMAN 




HARDING 


DOUGLAS 


B 


HARNEY 


GREGORY 


G 


HAROIAN 


HENRY 




HAROUTUNIAN 


HARRY 


J 


HARRINGTON 


NANCY 




HARRINGTON JR 


CLIFFORD 


F 


HARRINGTON JR 


WINTHROP 


W 


HARRINGTON JR 


WINTHROP 


W 


HARRIS 


ERIC 


A 



TOTAL 
VALUE 

85,00C 

150,100 

132,000 

139,800 

203,500 

106,800 

1,000 

236,400 

194,800 

158,600 

181,700 

122, 50C 

177,000 

145, 60C 

173,400 

301,800 

276,600 

210,000 

243,500 

134,700 

173,300 

146,600 

229,400 

176,100 

149,000 

107,900 

78,900 

86,800 

218,800 

12 2,800 

83,700 

154,900 

123,500 

7,200 

136,600 

80,200 

82,400 

52,100 

190,100 

267,800 

214,400 

135,200 

144,700 

158,300 

110,000 

144,400 

25 8,200 

117,400 

67,100 

16,800 

34,000 

408,400 

10,500 

178,500 



TOTAL 
TAX 

1,394.00 
2,461.64 
2,164.80 
2,292.72 
3,337.40 
1,751.52 
16.40 
3,876.96 
3,194.72 
2,601.04 
2,979.88 
2,009.00 
2,902.80 
2,387.84 
2,843.76 
4,949.52 
4,536.24 
3,444.00 
3,993.40 
2,209.08 
2,842.12 
2,404.24 
3,762.16 
2,888.04 
2,443.60 
1,769.56 
1,293.96 
1,423.52 
3,588.32 
2,013.92 
1,372.68 
2,540.36 
2,02 5.40 

118.08 
2,240.24 
1,315.28 
1,351.36 

854.44 
3,117.64 
4,391.92 
3,516.16 
2,217.28 
2,373.08 
2,596.12 
1,804.00 
2,368.16 
4,234.48 
1,925.36 
1,100.44 

275.52 

557.60 
6,697.76 

172.20 
2,927.40 



207 



VALUATION LIST FOR FISCAL 1983-1984 
REAL ESTATE 






PRIMARY OWNER 



HARRIS 

HARRIS 

HARRISON 

HARRISON 

HARRISON 

HARRISON 

HARVEY 

HATSOPOULOS 

HATSOPOULOS 

HAUGHEY EXTRX 

HAWES 

HAWKES GREGORY 

HAWORTH 

HAYES 

HAYS 

HAYTAYAN 

HEALEY JR 

HEALY 

HEART 

HEARTT 

HECHT 

HECK 

HECK 

HECK 

HECK 

HECK 

HECK 

HEIJN JR 

HELBURN 

HELLER JR 

HENDERSON 

HENDERSON 

HENDRICK 

HENDRICKSCN 

HERLIN 

HERMAN 

HERRMANN 

HERSCH 

HERSCHBACH 

HERTHEL 

HERTHEL 

HESTER 

HESTER 

HEWITT 

HIBBEN 

HICKEY 

HICKS 

HIERONYMUS 

HIGGINS III 

HIGH 

HILDEBRAND 

HILL 

HILL 

HINDS 



MELVYN H 

ROGER W 
ELIZA COPE 

HENRY F 
HENRY F DUP 
HENRY F DUPO 

FRANK L 

GEORGE N 

JOHN N 

SYLVIA M 

DONALD 
A £ ELAINE P 

GEORGE G 

WILSON C 

TIMOTHY P 

HARRY M 

HARRY R 

EDWARD M 

FRANK E 
CHARLOTTE B 

NORMAN B 
STANLEY 
STANLEY 
STANLEY 
STANLEY 
STANLEY 
STANLEY 
CORNELIUS 
PETER 

EDMOND A 

ROBERT S 

ROBERT S 

JAMES G 

ROBERT A 

MELVIN A 

PETER P 
CARL 
CHARLES 

DUDLEY R 

EVELYN S 

EVELYN S 

LEON B 

LEON B 
ELIZABETH C 

GEORGE C 
MARY-ELLEN 

ROBERT C 

WILLIAM H 

WILLIAM M 

JAMES J 
WERA 

AUDREY B 

CRAIG C 
EDWARD * H 



TOTAL 

VALUE 

213,700 
74,600 

16 3,200 
404,600 

38,800 

16,400 

254,400 

32 8,400 

340,600 

183,600 

153,000 

118,000 

115,800 

111,000 

153,400 

123,200 

170,700 

123,700 

149,100 

154,800 

153,000 

7,000 

8,300 

347,600 

5,000 

4,700 

36,700 

117,300 

163,700 

128,700 

128,600 

6,000 

159,300 

104,400 

202,700 

84,100 

67,300 

135,200 

17 7,500 
235,700 

14,300 
192,500 

15,40C 
16 1,400 
226,300 
142,900 

59,900 
270,500 

67,200 
147,300 
10 7,400 
129,700 
259,000 
108,500 



TOTAL 
TAX 

3,504.68 
1,223.44 
2 t 676.48 
6,63 5.44 

636.32 

268.96 
4,172.16 
5,385.76 
5,585.84 
3,011.04 
2,509.20 
1,935.20 
1,899.12 
1,820.40 
2,515.76 
2,020.48 
2,799.48 
2,028.68 
2,445.24 
2,538.72 
2,509.20 

114.80 

136. 12 

5,700.64 

82. CO 

77.08 

601.88 
1,923.72 
2,684.68 
2,110.68 
2,109.04 
98.40 
2,612.52 
1,712.16 
3,324.28 
1,379.24 
1,103.72 
2,217.28 
2,911.00 
3,865.48 

234.52 
3,157.00 

252.56 
2,646.96 
3,711.32 
2,343.56 

982.36 
4,436.20 
1,102.08 
2,415.72 
1,761.36 
2,127.08 
4,247.60 
1,779.40 



208 



VALUATION LIST FOR FISCAL 1983-1984 
REAL ESTATE 



«.«, .. PRIMARY 


OWNER — ■ 


•» -M* 


HINDS 


EDWARD 


H 


HINES DAVID J £ 


MARJORIE K 


J 


HINGSTON 


JOSEPH 


A 


HIRSCH 


NANCY 


L 


HOAR 


NORMAN 


W 


HOBEN 


ALLAN 




HOCH 


ALFRED 


D 


HOCH 


REIMAR H H 




HOCH 


REIMAR H H 




HODGSON 


NICHOLAS 


P 


HOLOEN 


SARAH 


C 


HOLDEN 


SARAH 


C 


HOLDEN 


SARAH 


C 


HOLLANO 


PETER 


A 


HOLLAND 


TAFFY 


K 


HOLLINGSWORTH 


LOWELL 


M 


HOLLISTER 


WALTER 


M 


HOOVER 


HENRY 


B 


HOPENGARTEN 


FREDRIC 


J 


HOPKINS 


MARK 




HOPKINS 


ROBERT 


D 


HORN 


MICHAEL 


C 


HORNE 


BENJAMIN 




HORNE 


BENJAMIN 




HORWITZ 


MURRAY 




HOSEY 


JOHN 


E 


HOUGHTON EST OF 


JOHN 


J 


HOUSMAN 


FRANK 


M 


HOWARD 


JOSEPH 


W 


HOWLAND 


FAITH 




HSU 


MICHAEL SHIH 


HUBBARD 


ELIOT 




HUBBARD 


WILLIAM 


T 


HUMEZ 


ALICE 


P 


HUMEZ 


ALICE 


P 


HUMEZ 


ALICE 


P 


HUMEZ 


ALICE 


P 


HUMEZ 


ALICE 


P 


HUNSAKER 


JEROME 




HUNSAKER JR 


JEROME 


C 


HUNT 


MERRILL 


T 


HUNTER WILLIAM BRUCE 




HURD 


JOSEPH 


F 


HURD 


JOSEPH 


F 


HURD 


KENNETH 


E 


HURD 


KENNETH 


E 


HURFF 


JOSEPH 


L 


HUTCHINSON JR 


JAMES 


A 


HYDE 


BENJAMIN 


D 


HYMAN 


MARK 




IDE 


KENTON 


J 


ILIESCU 


NICHOLAS 




IMMEL 


STEPHEN 


G 


INCANDELA 


JOSEPH 


J 



TOTAL 
VALUE 



294,700 

168,600 

100,500 

132,800 

149,000 

123,100 

108,700 

45,700 

71,500 

127,600 

364,200 

8,400 

96,600 

120,600 

134,900 

18 8,400 

136,800 

159,400 

103,200 

159,800 

144,400 

217,900 

5,500 

208,400 

176,900 

90,900 

61,000 

229,700 

161,800 

109,900 

20 7,500 

239,000 

109,700 

10,000 

77,000 

70,000 

154,000 

63,400 

306,700 

300 

110,400 

139,900 

205,200 

8,200 

66,100 

158,300 

135,500 

109,400 

172,900 

217,300 

99,400 

141,700 

181,100 

129,500 



TOTAL 
TAX 

4,833.08 
2,765.04 
1,648.20 
2,177.92 
2,443.60 
2,018.84 
1,782.68 

749.48 
1,172.60 
2,092.64 
5,972.88 

137.76 
1,584.24 
1,977.84 
2,212.36 
3,089.76 
2,243.52 
2,614.16 
1,692.48 
2,620.72 
2,368. 16 
3,573.56 
90.20 
3,417.76 
2,901.16 
1,490.76 
1,000.40 
3,767.08 
2,653.52 
1,802.36 
3,403.00 
3,919.60 
1,799.08 

164.00 
1,262.80 
1,148.00 
2,525.60 
1,039.76 
5,029.88 
4.92 
1,810.56 
2,294.36 
3,365.28 

134.48 
1,084.04 
2,596.12 
2,222.20 
1,794.16 
2,835.56 
3,563.72 
1,630.16 
2,323.88 
2,970.04 
2,123.80 



209 



VALUATION LIST FOR FISCAL 1983-1984 
REAL ESTATE 



_— . PRIMARY 


OWNER 


»«• 


INGARD 




K UNO 


"*"■*' 


IRELAND 




CHRISTOPHER 




IRWIN 




MARY 


M 


IRWIN 




PAUL 




IVES 




S WILLIAM 




IVES CECILIA VAN 


HOLLEN 




IVY REALTY 


TR 






IVY REALTY 


TR 






IVY REALTY 


TR 






IVY REALTY 


TR 






IVY REALTY 


TR 






IVY REALTY 


TR 






IVY REALTY 


TRUST 






JACKSON 




HUSON 




JACKSON JR 




GARDNER 




JAGGER 




JAMES 


M 


JAMES 




HAMILTON 


R 


JAMES 




HAMILTON 


R 


JANES 




G SARGENT 




JANOVSKY 




VLADIMIR 




JARVIS 




JOHN 


W 


JAYSON 




PATRICIA 


A 


JEFFREY 




JOSEPH 


H 


JENAL 




ROBERT 


L 


JENNEY 




CHARLES 


J 


JENNINGS 




CHARLES 


E 


JENSEN 




HOLGAR 


J 


JERODEL REALTY TRUST 




JERODEL REALTY TRUST 




JEVON 




ROBERT 


W 


JEWETT 




JULIE DAVIS 




JOHN 




DEWITT 




JOHNSON 




ERNEST 


L 


JOHNSON 




ERNEST 


L 


JOHNSON 




ERNEST 


L 


JOHNSON 




H W 




JOHNSON 




KENNETH 


A 


JOHNSON 




RICHARD 


A 


JOHNSTON 




CAROLYN 


B 


K-T CORP INC 






KAHN 




MARTIN 


H 


KALAIOJIAN 




W GERRIE 




KALAJIAN JF 


!. 


MICHAEL 


H 


KALBA 




KONRAD 


K 


KAMENY 




STUART 


M 


KANAREK 




STEPHEN 


D 


KANE 




ROGER 


K 


KANO 




CYRUS 


H 


KAO 




PETER 


S 


KARASSIK 




PETER 


T 


KARASSIK 




PETE'. 


T 


KARP 




LOR* 


S 


KASPERIAN 




KARL 


D 


KASS 




EDWARD 


H 



TOTAL 
VALUE 

162,300 

12 5,700 

207,800 

56,300 

219,000 

186,800 

14,800 

2,800 

5,500 

3,000 

3,300 

18,700 

42 8,000 

242,400 

134,100 

144,900 

8,800 

227,600 

152,100 

183,500 

161,900 

108,900 

116,700 

201,500 

130,300 

140,100 

98,200 

286,300 

9,700 

160,100 

188,100 

193,100 

205,800 

50,200 

75,300 

198,100 

146,700 

137,500 

169,700 

251,400 

232,200 

129,000 

210,400 

94,700 

233,700 

125,200 

80,000 

121,800 

249,400 

8,800 

8,800 

123,200 

262,600 

333,500 



TOTAL 
TAX 

2,661.72 
2,061.48 
3,407.92 

923.32 
3,591.60 
3,063.52 

242.72 
45.92 
90.20 
49.20 
54.12 

306.68 
7,019.20 
3,975.36 
2,199.24 
2,376.36 

144.32 
3,732.64 
2,494.44 
3,009.40 
2,655.16 
1,785.96 
1,913.88 
3,304.60 
2,136.92 
2,297.64 
1,610.48 
4,695.32 

159.08 
2,62 5.64 
3,084.84 
3,166.84 
3,375.12 

823.28 
1,234.92 
3,248.84 
2,405.88 
2,255.00 
2,783.08 
4,122.96 
3,808.08 
2,115.60 
3,450.56 
1,553.08 
3,832.68 
2,053.28 
1,312.00 
1,997.52 
4,090.16 

144.32 

144.32 
2,020.48 
4,306.64 
5,469.40 



210 



VALUATION LIST FOR FISCAL 1983-1984 
REAL ESTATE 



.- =, PRIMARY OWNER 


■■"■• 


KASSNER 


MICHAEL 


A 


KATZ 


SAUL 


L 


KAUFMAN 


MARC I A 


W 


KAUFMAN 


MIRIAM 


H 


KAUPE 


WALTER 




KAYE 


HAROLD 




KAYLOR 


RICHARD 


E 


KEAY 


DONALD 


P 


KEEVIL JR 


CHARLES 


S 


KEILY 


DELBAR 


P 


KELLEHER 


ROBERT 


J 


KELLEHER 


THOMAS 


E 


KELLEY 


ANDREW 


J 


KELLNER 


JOAN 




KELLY 


THOMAS 


W 


KENNARD 


HENRIETTA 


W 


KENNEDY 


ALBERT 


E 


KENNEDY 


JOHN 


P 


KENNEDY LAND 


CORP 




KENNEDY LAND 


CORP 




KENNEDY LAND 


CORP 




KENNEDY LAND 


CORPORATION 




KENNEY 


THOMAS 


F 


KERN 


EDWARD 


C 


KERREBPOCK 


JACK 


L 


KERSHAW 


THOMAS 


M 


KESSEL 


JOSEPH 


B 


KETTERINGHAM 


JOHN 


M 


KEYES 


JANET 


T 


KIM 


CHANG SOO 




KIMBALL 


JOAN C F 




KIMNACH 


ROBERT 


B 


KINDLEBERGER 


CHARLES 


P 


KING 


ELEANOR 


T 


KING 


WILLIAM 


A 


KINGSBURY HOWARD THAYER 




KIRBY 


GERARD 


L 


KIRKPATRICK 


MARGARET 


M 


KIRKPATRICK 


MARGARET 


M 


KISER 


DONALD 





KISTIAKOWSKY 


IRMA 


E 


KITSES 


STEVEN 


J 


KJELLANDER 


MARY 


C 


KLEM 


CHRISTOPHER 




KLING 


JOHN 


W 


KLOBUCHAR 


JOHN 


A 


KLOTZ 


ROBERT 


E 


KNOX 


WENDELL 


J 


KO 


NAI NAN 




KOEHLER 


EDWARD 


F 


KOLBIN 


LAWRENCE 




KOLK 


ROBERT 


S 


KOLLIGIAN 


ZOE 




KOLODNY 


MYER 


Z 



TOTAL 
VALUE 



136,400 
179,900 
188, 40C 
154,200 
182,300 
123,800 
292,200 
148,600 
186,600 

75,900 
157,300 

66,600 
158,300 

88,100 
154,000 
190,100 
3,200 
170,100 
208,900 
4,400 
101,800 

14,200 
312,300 
175,900 
191,000 
210,300 
137,300 
144,600 
111,800 
224, OOC 
149,900 
132,300 
125,900 
155,700 
107,600 
173,000 
100,600 
175,200 
1,400 
182,600 
214, 50C 
162,300 
135, 40C 
157,900 
122,100 
13 7,500 
168,700 
149,700 
299,100 
139,600 
191,600 

99,800 
304,900 
135,500 



TOTAL 
TAX 

2,236.96 
2,950.36 
3,089.76 
2,528.88 
2,989.72 
2,030.32 
4,792.08 
2,437.04 
3,060.24 
1,244.76 
2,579.72 
1,092.24 
2,596.12 
1,444.84 
2,525.60 
3,117.64 

52.48 
2,789.64 
3,425.96 

72.16 
1,669.52 
232.88 
5,121.72 
2,884.76 
3,132.40 
3,448.92 
2,251.72 
2,371.44 
1,833.52 
3,673.60 
2,458.36 
2,169.72 
2,064.76 
2,553.48 
1,764.64 
2,837.20 
1,649.84 
2,873.28 

22.96 
2,994.64 
3,517.80 
2,661.72 
2,220.56 
2,589.56 
2,002.44 
2,255.00 
2,766.68 
2,455.08 
4,905.24 
2,289.44 
3, 142.24 
1,636.72 
5,000.36 
2,222.20 



211 



VALUATION LIST FOR FISCAL 1983-1984 
REAL ESTATE 



PRIMARY OWNER — 



TOTAL 
VALUE 



TOTAL 
TAX 



KGNSTANDAKIS 

KOPP 

KORHONEM 

KORNFELD 

KOUMANTZELIS 

KOUPAS 

KROIN 

KRUSE 

KUBIK 

KUHNS 

KUHNS 

KUHNS-DIMANCESC 

KULKA 

KUMAR 

KURZINA 

KUSIK 

KWASNIAK 

LACKNER-GRAYBIE 

LADJEVAPCI 

LADJEVARDI 

LAHEY HEIRS OF 

LAHNSTEIN 

LANCASTER 

LANDRY 

LANDRY 

LANE 

LANG 

LANGTON 

LANKHORST 

LATHROP 

LAVRAKAS 

LAWSON 

LAWSON 

LAWSON 

LAWSON 

LAWSON 

LAY 

LAZARIDIS 

LEAPE 

LEARY JR 

LEAVER 

LEE 

LEE 

LEE 

LEE 

LEE 

LEE 

LEE 

LEE 

LEGATES 

LEGATES 

LEGER TRUSTEE 

LEGGAT 

LEINWAND 



NICHOLAS 

JAY 

MIRIAM 

GEORGE 

ARTHUR 

WILLIAM 

LAWRENCE 

ALICE 

JAMES 

ROGER 

ROGER 
U KATHERINE 

J PETER 

ANIL 

PETER 

CHARLES 

WALTER 
L JAMES 

HABIB 

HABIB 
JAMES 

RICHARD 

JOHN M W 

CHRISTOPH 

CHRISTOPH 

J FRANK 

RICHARD 

WILLIAM 

BEVERLY 

SCOTT 

APOSTLE 

HAROLD 

JOHN 

JOHN 

JOHN 

JOHN 

KENNETH 

LAZARUS 

MARTHA 

JOHN 

BARBARA 

JOHN 

KENNETH 

RICHARD 

ROBERT 

SHIH YING 

SHIH YING 

THOMAS 

THOMAS 

JOHN 

JOHN 

MARY 

THOMAS 

CHARLES 



ER 
ER 



R 
G 
V 
E 
S 
C 
J 
J 



K 

K 
K 

E 
G 
P 
A 

E 
R 
R 
R 
R 
W 
J 
P 
F 
S 
D 
R 
S 
E 



H 
H 
C 
C 
E 
E 
M 



62,700 

129,200 

116,600 

121,600 

284, 70G 

211,200 

147,500 

109,800 

138,600 

204,700 

9,100 

231,600 

89,100 

172,000 

137,500 

124,200 

131,200 

148,700 

319,300 

6,300 

44,400 

89,500 

94,900 

301, 50C 

289,200 

223,600 

198, 70C 

188,300 

113,900 

173, 20C 

43,500 

29,700 

18,500 

1,200 

2,200 

900 

184,100 

171,900 

18 2,800 

89,000 

16 7,60 

130,900 

164,200 

256,000 

176,900 

201,60 

125, 60C 

214,900 

6,500 

176,900 

4,200 

85,800 

218,400 

145,700 



1,028 

2,118 

1,912 

1,994 

4,669 

3,463 

2,419 

1,800 

2,273 

3,357 

149 

3,798 

1,461 

2,820 

2,255 

2,036 

2,151 

2,438 

5,236 

103 

72 8 

1,467 

1,556 

4,944 

4,742 

3,667 

3>258 

3,088 

1,867 

2,840 

713 

487 

303 

19 

36 

14 

3,019 

2,819 

2,997 

1,459 

2,748 

2,146 

2,692 

4,198 

2,901 

3,306 

2,059 

3,524 

106 

2,901 

68 

1,407 

3,581 

2,389 



• 28 
.88 
.24 
.24 
.08 
.68 
.00 
.72 
.04 
.08 
.24 
.24 
.24 
.80 
.00 

• 88 
.68 
.68 
.52 
.32 
.16 
.80 
.36 
.60 
.88 
.04 
.68 
. 12 
.96 
.48 
.40 
.08 
.40 
.68 
.08 
.76 
.24 
.16 
.92 
.60 
.64 
.76 
.88 
.40 
.16 
.24 
.84 
.36 
.60 
.16 
.88 
.12 
.76 
.48 



212 



VALUATION 



LIST FOR FISCAL 
REAL ESTATE 



1983-1984 



PRIMARY OWNER — 



TOTAL 
VALUE 



LEMANDER 


WILLIAM 


C 


LEMIRE 


ROBERT 


A 


LENINGTON 


ROBERT 


L 


LENNON 


JAMES 


V 


LENNON 


STEPHEN 


D 


LENNON 


STEPHEN 


D 


LEONARD 


S EDWARD 




LEONG 


JOSEPH 


C 


LESHICK 


JOSEPH 


J 


LESLIE 


PAUL 


M 


LEVEY JR 


HAROLD 


A 


LEVIN 


ALVIN 




LEVINE 


LEWIS 


J 


LEVY 


MORRIS 


S 


LEWIS TRUST 


MARION 


S 


LI 


MINGCHE 


M 


LI 


YAO T 




LIBERMAN 


JAMES 


B 


LIBROT 


HOWARD 




LIODICK 


HAROLD 


S 


LIDDICK 


HAROLD 


S 


LIEPINS 


ATIS 


A 


LIGHT JR 


GALEN 


D 


LINCOLN HOMES 


CORP 




LINCOLN OLD TOWN HALL CORP 




LINDSAY 


FRANKLIN 


A 


LINGOS 


JOHN 


G 


LINNELL 


ZENOS 


M 


LINSTROM 


PETER 


J 


LIPPMAN 


ANNE 


F 


LIPTON 


JEFFREY 


M 


LITTE 


RUDOLPH 




LITTLE 


JOHN D C 




LITTLEFIELD 


PAUL 


D 


LIVERMORE JR 


ROBERT 




LLOYD 


DONAL 


B 


LO 


STEVEN 


S 


LOCK WOOD JR 


DUNBAR 




LOEWENSTEIN 


DAVIDA 


G 


LOEWENSTEIN 


PAUL 




LONG 


LESLIE 


B 


LOUD 


JOHN 


F 


LOUD 


ROBERT 


L 


LOUGHLIN 


LEONA 


K 


LOVERING 


TALBOT 


D 


LOW 


STEPHEN 


R 


LUDDEN 


JOHN 


M 


LUFT 


LUDWIG 




LUSE 


ALAN 


J 


LUSTWERK 


FERDINAND 




LUTNICKI 


HARRIET 


H 


LUTNICKI 


HARRIET 


H 


LUTNICKI 


VICTOR 


A 


LYON S 


JOYCE 


W 



166,500 
154,000 
136,800 
100,600 
112,100 
8,000 
116,800 

90,900 
145,200 

66,100 
117,700 
188,500 
235,800 
106,900 
198,800 

76,500 
210,400 
11 1,000 
334,100 
113,900 
8,800 
160,700 
115,800 
5, 192,300 

53,000 
277,900 
155,100 
154,000 
103,600 
121,400 
398,200 
147,800 
165,400 
155.00C 
204,800 
164,600 

99,600 
240,500 
151,600 
156,100 
137,300 
219,600 
100,000 

77,600 
129,400 
165,400 
149,800 
140,100 

76,500 

140,900 

2,900 

6,200 

245,000 

117,000 





TOTAL 




TAX 


2, 


730, 


,60 


2, 


52 5- 


,60 


2, 


243. 


,52 


li 


649, 


,84 


1, 


838. 


,44 




131. 


,20 


li 


915, 


,52 


1* 


490. 


,76 


2, 


381, 


,28 


1, 


084, 


,04 


li 


930, 


,28 


3, 


091, 


,40 


3, 


867, 


,12 


li 


753, 


,16 


3, 


260, 


,32 


li 


254. 


,60 


3 S 


450, 


,56 


li 


820, 


,40 


5, 


479. 


,24 


1, 


, 867 , 


,96 




144, 


32 


2, 


635, 


,48 


li 


899, 


,12 


5, 


153, 


,72 




869, 


,20 


4, 


.557, 


,56 


2, 


543, 


,64 


2, 


525. 


,60 


1, 


699. 


,04 


1. 


990, 


,96 


6, 


.530, 


,48 


2i 


423. 


92 


2, 


712, 


,56 


2, 


.542, 


,00 


3, 


358, 


,72 


2, 


699, 


,44 


li 


633, 


,44 


3i 


944, 


,20 


2, 


486, 


,24 


2, 


560, 


,04 


2, 


251, 


,72 


3, 


601. 


44 


li 


640, 


,00 


li 


272, 


,64 


2, 


.122, 


16 


2, 


712. 


,56 


2, 


.456. 


,72 


2, 


29 7, 


64 


li 


254. 


,60 


2, 


310, 


,76 




47, 


,56 




101, 


,68 


4, 


018, 


00 


li 


918. 


80 



213 



VALUATION LIST FOR FISCAL 1983-1984 
REAL ESTATE 



PRIMA 


RY OWNER 




LYTLE JR 


WILLIAM 





MACCLARY 


MALCOLM 


W 


MACDONALC 


RICHARD 


E 


MACDONALD 


WINSLOW 


H 


MACHEN 


WILLIAM 


F 


MACINNIS 


HAZEL 


A 


MACKENZIE 


ETHEL 


L 


MACKENZIE 


MURDOCK 


J 


MACLAUGHLIN 


ROBERT 


S 


MACLAURIN 


ELFRIEDE 




MACLAURIN 


ELFRIEDE 


C 


MACLAURIN 


ELFRIEDE 


C 


MACLAURIN 


ELLEN 




MACLEAN 


H ARNOLD 




MACLEOD 


GEORGE 


A 


MACLEOD 


JOSEPHINE 


F 


MACMAHON 


DARCY 


G 


MACMAHON 


H EDWARD 




MACNEIL 


BRUCE 


M 


MACNEIL 


RONALD 


L 


MA HAN 


RUSSELL 


P 


MAHAN 


RUSSELL 


P 


MA HAN 


RUSSELL 


P 


MAHAN 


RUSSELL 


P 


MAHONEY 


GEORGE 




MAHONEY 


JOHN 


D 


MAIER 


EMANUEL 




MALKIN 


JAMES 


M 


MALLOY 


DAVID 


C 


MALLOY 


MATTHEW 


J 


MALLOY JR 


ROBERT 


M 


MALLOY JR 


ROBERT 


M 


MALONEY JR 


BERNARD 


C 


MANCIB 


RICHARD 


A 


MANNARINQ 


JOSEPH 




MANNING 


CATHERINE 


L 


MANOS 


STEVEN 


S 


MANSFIELD 


JAMES 


S 


MANSFIELC 


RICHARD 


C 


MA NZ ELL I 


DONALD 


M 


MANZELLI 


JOHN 




MAR 


JAMES 


W 


MARANIAN SR 


ARTHUR 


A 


MARCKS 


RONALD 


H 


MARCUS 


FRED 




MARCUVITZ 


ANDREW 




MARIER 


BRUCE 


E 


MARONI 


KEVIN 


J 


MARONI 


KEVIN 


J 


MARSH 


PAUL 


E 


MARTIN 


ROBERT 


T 


MARTINI 


WILLIAM 


F 


MASON 


BETTY 




MASON 


RICHARD 


K 



TOTAL 
VALUE 



161,700 

58,000 

185,700 

151,700 

222,000 

93,100 

155,800 

105, IOC 

12 5,200 

198,300 

19,000 

19,000 

179,000 

141,900 

90,800 

97,200 

284,600 

113,200 

164,100 

85,60C 

112,300 

143,300 

2,400 

3,100 

111,400 

175,300 

20 2 , 80 

149,500 

67,600 

12,800 

11,200 

101,100 

184,300 

139,900 

83,200 

90,500 

125, 60C 

158,000 

229^800 

234,700 

97,600 

116,600 

203,200 

184,500 

117,500 

121,500 

188,800 

17,900 

187,200 

231,900 

133,400 

144,900 

125,700 

102,100 



TOTAL 
TAX 

2,651.88 
951.20 
3,045.48 
2,487.88 
3,640.80 
1,526.84 
2,555.12 
1,723.64 
2,053.28 
3,252.12 
311.60 
311.60 
2,935.60 
2,327.16 
1,489.12 
1,594.08 
4,667.44 
1,856.48 
2,691.24 
1,403.84 
1,841.72 
2,350.12 
39.36 
50.84 
1,826.96 
2,874.92 
3,325.92 
2,451.80 
1,108.64 
209.92 
183.68 
1,658.04 
3,022.52 
2,294.36 
1,364.48 
1,484.20 
2,059.84 
2,591.20 
3,768.72 
3,849.08 
1,600.64 
1,912.24 
3,332.48 
3,025.80 
1,927.00 
1,992.60 
3,096.32 
293.56 
3,070.08 
3,803.16 
2,187.76 
2,376.36 
2,061.48 
1,674.44 



214 



VALUATION LIST FOR FISCAL 1983-1984 
REAL ESTATE 







TOTAL 
VALUE 


TOTAL 
TAX 


MASON 


VIRGINIA 


C 


200,400 


3,286.56 


MASSACHUSETTS 


AUDUBON SOC 




87,000 


1,426.80 


MASSACHUSETTS 


AUDUBON SOC INC 


65,000 


1,066.00 


MASSACHUSETTS 


CENTERS INC 




1,763,000 


28,913.20 


MASSACHUSETTS 


PORT AUTHORITY 




101,400 


1,662.96 


MASSACHUSETTS 


PORT AUTHORITY 




133,900 


2,195.96 


MASSACHUSETTS 


PORT AUTHORITY 




109,400 


1,794.16 


MASSACHUSETTS 


PORT AUTHORITY 




85,300 


1,398.92 


MASSACHUSETTS 


PORT AUTHORITY 




107,500 


1,763.00 


MASTERS 


JOSEPH 


I 


212,700 


3,488.28 


MATHUR 


DILIP 


K 


120,100 


1,969.64 


MATTES 


SARA 


A 


146,700 


2,405.88 


MAURER 


DAVID 


L 


8 5,60C 


1,403.84 


MAXWELL 


PHYLLIS 


B 


163,300 


2,678.12 


MAY 


DORIS HUDSON 


167,600 


2,748.64 


MAY JR 


JAMES 


W 


334,400 


5,484. 16 


MAYFIELD 


GLOVER 


B 


184,000 


3,017.60 


MAYO 


STEPHEN 


K 


152,500 


2,501.00 


MCALEER 


HAROLD 


T 


89,100 


1,461.24 


MCAROLE 


LOIS 




168,300 


2,760.12 


MCCLAIN 


DAVID 


S 


124,200 


2,036.88 


MCCOLL 


ARCHIBALD 


M 


109,900 


1,802.36 


MCCUNE 


WILLIAM 


J 


122,200 


2,004.08 


MCCUNE 


WILLIAM 


J 


166,300 


2,727.32 


MCCUNE 


WILLIAM 


J 


231,500 


3,796.60 


MCCUNE JR 


WILLIAM 


J 


700 


11.48 


MCCUNE JR 


WILLIAM 


J 


18,500 


303.40 


MCCUNE JR 


WILLIAM 


J 


18,500 


303.40 


MCCUNE JR 


WILLIAM 


J 


115, 60C 


1,895.84 


MCOOUGALD 


RONALD 


J 


193,000 


3,165.20 


MCOOUGALO RONALD J & KATHLEEN 


6,300 


103.32 


MCGETTIGAN JOHN T & MARIKA 




159,800 


2,620.72 


MCHUGH 


JOHN 


E 


166,000 


2,722.40 


MCHUGH III 


JAMES 


F 


187,500 


3,075.00 


MCINNIS 


DONALD 


G 


153,800 


2,522.32 


MCKENNAN 


ALICE 




157,600 


2,584.64 


MCKNIGHT 


DAVID 


B 


97,400 


1,597.36 


MCKNIGHT 


DAVID 


B 


36,000 


590.40 


MCKNIGHT EX 


ERNEST 


T 


95,000 


1,558.00 


MCLELLAN 


JOHN 


W 


72,500 


1,189.00 


MCMAHON 


HOWARD 




12,800 


209.92 


MCMAHON 


HOWARD 




369,500 


6,059.80 


MC MORROW 


MAUREEN 


c 


258, 60C 


4,241.04 


MCQUAIO 


RICHARD 


F 


243,400 


3,991.76 


MCWADE 


PAUL 


E 


176,200 


2,889.68 


MEAD 


VARNUM 


R 


151,100 


2,478.04 


MEADE 


EDMUND 


J 


172,200 


2,824.08 


MECSAS 


MICHAEL 


E 


151,000 


2,476.40 


MEEKS 


M LITTLETON 




205,100 


3,363.64 


MEENAN 


MARION MOREY 


199,000 


3,263.60 


MELANSON 


LEONARD 


J 


78,700 


1,290.68 


MENINO 


MARY 


M 


106,700 


1,749.88 


MERIAM 


ALICE 




63,700 


1,044.68 


MERIAM 


ALICE 




63,700 


1,044.68 



215 



VALUATION LIST FOR FISCAL 1983-1984 
REAL ESTATE 



— — -» PRIMARY 


OWNER — 


wm ' tm 


MERIAM 


ELLIN 


F 


MERI AN 


RICHARD 


F 


MERRILL 


VINCENT 


N 


MERULLO 


ANTHONY 


D 


MESSINA 


ELENA 


C 


MESSINA 


MAURO 


J 


MESSINA JASPARE 


£ GRAZIA 




MEYER 


EUGENE 


B 


MEYER 


RICHARD 


F 


MICHENER 


SUSANAH 


H 


MIKROPOULOS 


HARILAOSE 




MILENOEP 


SUMNER 


N 


MILLARD 


DONALD 


A 


MILLARD 


SUSAN 




MILLARD JR 


DONALD 


A 


MILLER 


HAROLD 


T 


MILLER 


JOSEPH 


C 


MILLER 


KEITH 


W 


MILLS 


RODNEY 


S 


MINNICK 


M AR TH A 


E 


MINTZ 


NORBETT 


L 


MIX 


THOMAS 


R 


MIXON 


SCOTT 


I 


MLAVSKY ABRAHAM 


I L SALLY A 




MOHR 


JOHN 


J 


MOLLER 


CYNTHIA 




MONTGOMERY JR 


MAURICE 


M 


MOOR 


EDGAR 


J 


MOORE 


PAUL 




MOORE 


ROBERT 


L 


MOORE JR 


MURVALE 


H 


MORAN 


J DAVID 




MORAN 


J DAVID 




MORAN 


J DAVID 




MORAN 


J DAVID 




MORENCY 


MARY 


V 


MORETTE 


WALTER 


J 


MORE Y 


KENNETH 




MORGAN 


HENRY 


M 


MORGAN 


HENRY 


M 


MORGAN III 


ROBERT 


G 


MOPGANTI 


VICTOR 


M 


MORI NO 


LUIGI 




MORRIS 


BEATRICE 


M 


MORRIS 


BEATRICE 


M 


MORRIS 


LLOYD 




MORRISSEY 


J NEIL 




MORRISSEY 


J NEIL 




MORSE 


THOMAS 


R 


MORSE 


THOMAS 


R 


MORSE 


WILLIAM 


H 


MORSE 


WILLIAM 


H 


MORSER 


CALVIN 


S 


MORTON 


PETER 


w 



TOTAL 
VALUE 

105, OGC 

26 5,60 
111,500 
123,500 

27 1,800 
157,300 
101,500 
291,200 

12,700 

79,300 
160,600 
24 3,400 
247,200 
282,500 
298,100 
210,000 
201,400 
204,700 
176,900 

96,800 
202,200 
143,000 
142,000 
224,700 
346,300 

92,600 
112,500 
222,200 
300 
140,100 
162,300 
5,000 

38,900 
5,200 

15,400 
204,200 
139,600 

78,900 
22 7,000 
1,200 
171,300 
232,600 
104,100 
1,400 

41,700 
125,800 
102,300 
4,200 
192,600 
2,000 
171,300 

96,000 
134,900 
170,900 



TOTAL 
TAX 

1,722.00 
4,355.84 
1,828.60 
2,02 5.40 
4,457.52 
2,579.72 
1,664.60 
4,775.68 

208.28 
1,300.52 
2,633.84 
3,991.76 
4,054.08 
4,633.00 
4,888.84 
3,444.00 
3,302.96 
3,357.08 
2,901.16 
1,587.52 
3,316.08 
2,345.20 
2,328.80 
3,685.08 
5,679.32 
1,518.64 
1,845.00 
3,644.08 
4.92 
2,297.64 
2,661.72 
82.00 

637.96 
85.28 

252.56 
3,348.88 
2,289.44 
1,293.96 
3,722.80 
19.68 
2,809.32 
3,814.64 
1,707.24 
22.96 

683.88 
2,063.12 
1,677.72 
68.88 
3,158.64 
32.80 
2,809.32 
1,574.40 
2,212.36 
2,802.76 



216 



VALUATION LIST FOR FISCAL 1983-1984 
REAL ESTATE 



,- PRIMARY 


OWNER — 


MORTON 


PETER W 


MOSHEP 


DAVID B 


MOSHER 


DAVID B 


MOSHER 


DAVID B 


MOSHER 


DAVID B 


MOSHER 


DAVID B 


MOSHER 


DAVID/CLAIRE 


MOSHER 


DAVID/CLAIRE 


MOSHER 


DAVID/CLAIRE 


MOSHER 


DAVID/CLAIRE 


MOSHER 


DAVID /CLAIRE 


MOSHER 


DAVID/CLAIRE 


MOSS 


JAMES 


MOSS 


JAMES 


MOSS 


KAREN M 


MOSS 


LEONARD G 


MOSS 


PHILIP N 


MOSS 


RODNEY E 


MOSS 


SIDNEY 


MOSS 


SIDNEY 


MOUNT 


WAYNE D 


MOZZI 


ROBERT L 


MRAKOVICH 


DAV ID V 


MRUGALA 


ANTHONY J 


MRUGALA 


ANTHONY J 


MUOGE 


JEFFREY M 


MUELLER 


ROBERT K 


MUKITARIAN 


STEPHANIE 


MULCAHY 


DOUGLAS J 


MUNROE JR 


WILLIAM C 


MURPHY 


BARTHOLOMEW 


MURPHY 


EDWARD W 


MURPHY 


PERSIS S 


MURPHY 


RUTH M 


MURPHY JR 


WILLIAM J 


MURPHY MINA DOROTHEA 


MUTSCHLER 


LOUIS H 


MYERS 


LUCY B 


MYGATT 


SAMUEL G 


MYLES 


THERESA ANNE 


MYRABO 


LEIK 


NABIH 


ISMAIL 


NADOLSKI 


THOMAS W 


NAIMAN 


MARK L 


NAJARIAN 


K GEORGE 


NAJJAR 


EDWARD G 


NARDONE 


NANCY E 


NAROO 


JOEL BARRY 


NASH 


DARYL 


NATWIG 


DAVID L 


NAWOICHIK AOM 


ELSIE W 


NEILEY 


ALEXANDER H 


NEILY 


ALEXANDER H 


NELSON 


ALBERT E 



TOTAL 
VALUE 



1,200 

11,700 

28,000 

17,200 

285,500 

900 

60,500 

60,500 

55,O0C 

60,500 

55,000 

60,500 

99,000 

700 

159, 40G 

125,000 

172,600 

327,100 

151,300 

5,50C 

153,600 

165,900 

155, 60C 

22,700 

91,200 

112,000 

257,200 

92,500 

96,200 

127,900 

116,400 

115,000 

91,100 

203,500 

300 

80,900 

161,700 

118,500 

152,400 

162,400 

179,700 

210,200 

121,800 

118,700 

25 5,40 

212,000 
203,800 
102,900 
114,800 
103,900 
207,100 
144,600 
6,600 
121,100 



TOTAL 
TAX 

19.68 

191.88 

459.20 

282.08 

4,682.20 

14.76 

992.20 

992.20 

902.00 

992.20 

902.00 

992.20 

1,623.60 

11.48 

2,614.16 

2,050.00 

2,830.64 

5,364.44 

2,481.32 

90.20 

2,519.04 

2,720.76 

2,551.84 

372.28 

1,495.68 

1,836.80 

4,218.08 

1,517.00 

1,577.68 

2,097.56 

1,908.96 

1,886.00 

1,494.04 

3,337.40 

4.92 

1,326.76 

2,651.88 

1,943.40 

2,499.36 

2,663.36 

2,947.08 

3,447.28 

1,997.52 

1,946.68 

4,188.56 

3,476.80 

3,342.32 

1,687.56 

1,882.72 

1,703.96 

3,396.44 

2,371.44 

108.24 

1,986.04 



217 



VALUATION LIST FOR FISCAL 1983-1984 
REAL ESTATE 



— PRIMARY 


OWNER 


*»_ 


TOTAL 


TOTAL 










VALUE 
169,800 


TAX 


NELSON 




JEAN 


R 


2,784,72 


NENNEMAN 




RICHARD 


A 


216,700 


3,553.88 


NESSEN 




E RICHARD 




188,600 


3,093.04 


NESTO BRUNO RICHARD 




1,000 


16.40 


NEUMANN 




ERNEST 


P 


18,400 


301.76 


NEUMANN 




ERNEST 


P 


200,900 


3,294.76 


NEUMANN 




ERNEST 


P 


5, IOC 


83.64 


NEUMANN 




SYLVIA 


B 


64,100 


1,051.24 


NEWBOLD 




THOMAS 




4 8,000 


787.20 


NEWBOLD 




THOMAS 




140,100 


2,297.64 


NEWCOMBE 




CHARLES 


A 


154,300 


2,530.52 


NEWCOMBE 




LAWRENCE 


S 


77,900 


1,277.56 


NEWELL 




LENA 


M 


89,800 


1,472.72 


NEWMAN 




DAISY 




104,000 


1,705.60 


NEWMAN 




ROBERT 


B 


473,900 


7,771.96 


NEWTON 




HARLAND 


B 


131,500 


2,156.60 


NEWTON JR 




GEORGE 


C 


148,500 


2,435.40 


NICHOLSON 




KATHRYN 


M 


241,300 


3,957.32 


NICKERSON 




BRUCE 


H 


116,000 


1,902.40 


NICKERSON ELIZABETH PERKINS 




226,100 


3,708.04 


NICOLAIDES 




PARIS 




230,500 


4,600.20 


NILES 




ROBERT 


L 


160,300 


2,628.92 


NIS8ET 




IAN C T 




117,500 


1,927.00 


NOCKLES 




WILLIAM 


A 


91,900 


1,507.16 


NOPAKUN 




SUVITYA 




197,900 


3,245.56 


NORLING 




ROBERT 


A 


142,900 


2,343.56 


NORRIS 




MARY 


L 


150,700 


2,471.48 


NOSS 




GEORGE 


M 


125,700 


2,061.48 


NOTKIN 




LEONARD 




176,000 


2,886.40 


NUNES 




GEOFFREY 




255,800 


4,195.12 


OAK 




INGUL IVAN 




151,800 


2,489.52 


OAK MEADCW 


CORP 






205,500 


3,370.20 


OAK MEADOW 


CORP 






17,600 


288.64 


OAK MEADCW 


CORP 






115,800 


1,899.12 


OAK MEADCW 


CORP 






76,500 


1,254.60 


OAK MEADCW 


CORPORATION 




80,000 


1,312.00 


OAK MEADCW 


CORPORATION 




76,500 


1,254.60 


OAK MEADCW 


CORPORATION 




76,500 


1,254.60 


CBRIEN 




DANIEL 


F 


91,600 


1,502.24 


OBRIEN 




DANIEL 


F 


10,100 


165.64 


OBRIEN 




JOHN 


H 


147,600 


2,420.64 


OBRIEN 




JOHN 


H 


67,400 


1,105.36 


OBRIEN 




JOSEPH 


A 


127,700 


2,094.28 


OCONNOR 




JOHN 


T 


158,900 


2,605.96 


OGDEN 




DAVID 




205,300 


3,366.92 


OGILVIE 




GORDON 


H 


132,700 


2,176.28 


OHL 




ROBERT 


C 


96,800 


1,587.52 


OKIN 




ROBERT 




6,000 


98.40 


OKIN 




ROBERT 


L 


297,800 


4,883.92 


OKIN 




ROBERT 


L 


5,60C 


91.84 


OLD 




BRUCE 


S 


133,400 


2,187.76 


OLD COUNTY 


REALTY TRUST 




56,800 


931.52 


OLD COUNTY 


REALTY TRUST 




8,700 


142.68 


OLD COUNTY 


REALTY TRUST 




1,300 


21.32 



218 



VALUATION 



LIST FOR FISCAL 
REAL ESTATE 



1983-1984 



PRIMARY OWNER 



TOTAL 
VALUE 



OLD COUNTY 


REALTY TRUST 




OLD COUNTY 


REALTY TRUST 




OLD COUNTY 


REALTY TRUST 




OLD COUNTY 


REALTY TRUST 




OLD COUNTY 


REALTY TRUST 




OLD COUNTY 


REALTY TRUST 




OLD COUNTY 


REALTY TRUST 




OLD COUNTY 


REALTY TRUST 




OLD COUNTY 


REALTY TRUST 




OLD COUNTY 


REALTY TRUST 




OLD COUNTY 


REALTY TRUST 




OLD COUNTY 


REALTY TRUST 




OLD COUNTY 


REALTY TRUST 




OLD COUNTY 


REALTY TRUST 




OLD COUNTY 


REALTY TRUST 




OLD COUNTY 


REALTY TRUST 




OLD COUNTY 


REALTY TRUST 




OLIVIERI 


JAMES 




OLOUGHLIN 


JOHN 


M 


OLSEN 


KENNETH 


H 


OLSHANSKY 


KENNETH 


J 


ONEIL 


DAVID 




ONEILL 


EDWARD 


J 


ONIGMAN 


MARC 


P 


ORDER OF SAINT ANNE 




OROURKE 


PAUL 


K 


ORZELL 


FRANK 


R 


OSBORNE 


GORDON 




OSBORNE 


GORDON 




OSBORNE 


GORDON 




OSBORNE 


GORDON 




OSBORNE 


GORDON 




OSBORNE 


GORDON 




OSBORNE 


GORDON 




GUTTEN TRUSTEE NANCY 


K 


OWEN 


CHARLES 


J 


OWEN 


R CALVIN 




PABOOJIAN-HAGOPIAN HELEN 




PADDOCK 


ANN 


E 


PADDOCK 


JAMES 


L 


PAGE 


ELLIOTT 


F 


PAGE 


LOT 


B 


PAGE 


STANLEY 


W 


PAGE JR 


WALTER 


H 


PAGLIERANI 


LAWRENCE 


A 


PAINE 


JASON 


C 


PAINE 


THOMAS 


M 


PALMER 


ATTELIO 


A 


PANETTA 


FRANK 




PANETTA 


FRANK 




PANETTA 


FRANKLIN 




PANETTA 


JAMES 


J 


PANETTA 


MARY 


N 


PANETTA 


SALVATORE 





44,800 

200 

8,200 

100 

1,400 

50,700 

54,000 

46,300 

3,100 

1,100 

49,000 

200 

900 

44,000 

5,000 

800 

1,000 

81,100 

153,700 

307, 60C 

102,300 

76,400 

150,900 

91,600 

81,600 

192,100 

193,600 

34,200 

15,600 

14,900 

3,800 

19,700 

8,60C 

200,700 

129,000 

120,100 

73,100 

123,800 

93,100 

217,200 

115,000 

202,200 

95,100 

209,000 

145,500 

3,800 

180,000 

97,700 

13,400 

108,900 

11,200 

87,100 

100,200 

83,400 



TOTAL 
TAX 

734.72 

3.28 

134.48 

1.64 

22.96 

831.48 

885.60 

759.32 

50.84 

18.04 

803.60 

3.28 

14.76 

721.60 

82.00 

13.12 

16.40 

1,330.04 

2,520.68 

5,044.64 

1,677.72 

1,252.96 

2,474.76 

1,502.24 

1,338.24 

3,150.44 

3,175.04 

560.88 

255.84 

244.36 

62.32 

323.08 

141.04 

3,291.48 

2*115.60 

1,969.64 

1,198.84 

2,030.32 

1,526.84 

3,562.08 

1,886.00 

3,316.08 

1,559.64 

3,427.60 

2,386.20 

62.32 

2,952.00 

1,602.28 

219.76 

1,785.96 

183.68 

1,428.44 

1,643.28 

1,367.76 



219 



VALUATION LIST FOR FISCAL 1983-1984 
REAL ESTATE 



PRIMARY OWNER — » 



TOTAL 
VALUE 



PANTA2ELCS 


PETER 


G 


PAREEK 


PURNA 


N 


PARIS 


JUDITH 




PARKE 


NATHAN 


G 


PARKE IV 


NATHAN 


G 


PARKER 


JACKSON 


B 


PAPLA 


JOHN 


J 


PARSONS 


DAVID 


W 


PASTORIZA 


JAMES 


J 


PAUL 


LOUISE 


C 


PAYNE 


DORIS 


K 


PAYNE 


H MORSE 




PAYNE 


ROGER 


S 


PAYNE 


ROGER 


S 


PAYNE 


WILLIAM 


T 


PAYNE 


WILLIAM 


T 


PEARLMAN 


ROBERT 




PEARMAIN 


W ROBERT 




PEARMAIN 


W ROBERT 




PEARMAIN 


W ROBERT 




PEARMAIN 


WM ROBERT 




PEAVY JR 


LEOPOLD 




PEIRCE 


ISABEL 


T 


PEJCHAR 


JAN 




PELOQUIN 


ROY 


J 


PELOQUIN 


ROY 


J 


PERCH 


ALVIN 




PERERA JR 


GUI DO 


R 


PERERA JR 


GUI DO 


R 


PERERA JR 


GUI DO 


R 


PERLMAN 


SAMUEL 


S 


PERRY 


JOHN 


R 


PEPRY 


JOHN CURTIS 




PERRY 


RACHEL 




PERRY 


RICHARD 




PERRY 


RICHARD 


C 


PERRY 


WADE 




PERTZOFF 


GLGA 




PERTZGFF 


OLGA 




PETERSON 


MARY 


E 


PETERSON 


MARY 


E 


PETERSON 


MARY 


E 


PETTIGREW 


VALERIE D 




PHELPS 


ELAINE 


B 


PHELPS 


ROBERT 


H 


PHELPS-BRAUN 


DIANE 


K 


PHILLIPPS 


PATRICK 




PHILLIPPS 


PATRICK 




PHILLIPS 


CHARLOTTE 


E 


PHILLIPS 


CHARLOTTE 


T 


PHINNEY, 


JEAN 


R 


PHO 


JOHMY 


C 


PHO 


J OH JNY 


C 


PIANKA 


WALTER 


E 



245,500 

55,60C 

66,100 

8,60C 

185,000 

147,000 

210,600 

185,700 

236,400 

105,500 

172,400 

128,700 

130,700 

1,000 

26,900 

172,300 

221,000 

3,400 

1,400 

11,800 

158,600 

293,500 

132,200 

126,000 

900 

83,900 

246,300 

1,400 

8,400 

276,000 

376,400 

139,800 

17 5,200 

261,700 

100 

186,500 

94,600 

200 

200 

126,900 

24,200 

15,70C 

220,900 

152,100 

143,200 

187,900 

153,000 

2,000 

7,400 

248,200 

131,800 

124,500 

124,200 

159,300 



TOTAL 
TAX 

4,026.20 

911.84 
1,084.04 

141.04 
3,034.00 
2,410.80 
3,453.84 
3,045.48 
3,876.96 
1,730.20 
2,827.36 
2,110.68 
2,143.48 
16.40 

441.16 

2,825.72 

3,624.40 

55.76 

22.96 

193.52 
2,601.04 
4,813.40 
2,168.08 
2,066.40 
14.76 
1,375.96 
4,039.32 
22.96 

137.76 

4,526.40 

6,172.96 

2,292.72 

2,873.28 

4,291.88 

1.64 

3,058.60 

1,551.44 

3.28 

3.28 

2,081.16 

396.88 

257.48 
3,622.76 
2,494.44 
2,348.48 
3,081.56 
2,509.20 
32.80 

121.36 
4,070.48 
2,161.52 
2,041.80 
2,036.88 
2,612.52 



220 



VALUATION LIST FOR FISCAL 1983-1984 
REAL ESTATE 







PICCININI 


HELEN 


M 


PICKETT 


ROBERT 


C 


PICKMAN 


ANTHONY 




PICKMAN 


ANTHONY 




PICKMAN 


ANTHONY 




PICKMAN 


ANTHONY 


L 


PIERCE CHARLES 


ELIOT 




PIKE 


JOHN 


A 


PIKL 


GEROLF M S 




PINGEON 


JAMES 


R 


PINO 


FRANK 


J 


PINO 


FRANK 


J 


PINTO 


ROBERT 


W 


PINTO 


ROBERT 


W 


PLANT 


PAUL 


R 


PLOUFFE 


FRANCIS 


A 


PLUKAS 


JOHN 


M 


POOSEN 


ROBERT 


E 


POMEROY 


DOROTHY 




PONCHATOULA LIMITED 




POSTEL 


SHOLEM 




POULOS 


CHARLES 


L 


POULOS 


CHARLES 


L 


POWERS 


MARTIN 


J 


POWERS JR 


FRANCIS 


L 


PRATT 


NANCY 


A 


PRESTON 


WILLIAM 


M 


PRESTON 


WILLIAM 


M 


PRIVITERA 


SALVATORE 


S 


PROTOPAPA 


SEJFI 




PRUSSING 


CARL 




PRZBYLSKI 


JOHN 


L 


PRZBYLSKI 


JOHN 


L 


PRZBYLSKI 


JOHN 


L 


PRZBYLSKI 


JOHN 


L 


PRZBYLSKI 


JOHN 


L 


PUFFER JR 


RICHARD 


F 


PUGH III 


ALEXANDER 


L 


PULLO 


PAMELA 


B 


QUARTON 


GARDNER 




RAAG 


VALVO 




RAAG 


VOLVO 




RABURN 


VERN 


L 


RAGAN 


RALPH 


R 


RAGAN 


RALPH 


R 


RAJA 


ROY 


M 


RAKER 


ANNE 


M 


RAND 


WILLIAM 


M 


RANDO 


FELIX 




RANDO 


THOMAS 




RAPPAPORT 


JEROME 


L 


RAPPERPORT 


EUGENE- 


J 


RAPPOLI 


ARTHUR 


E 


RASCO 


AUSTIN 





TOTAL 
VALUE 

154,200 

190,000 

60,000 

15,700 

249,000 

12,800 

146,900 

276,800 

194,200 

107,800 

85,600 

18,400 

71,000 

124,000 

14 8,000 

110,200 

314, 30C 

222,200 

120,900 

264,100 

104,600 

84,900 

137,900 

80,300 

82,500 

20,600 

263,600 

2,900 

20 4,400 

220,000 

2,700 

400 

2,900 

2,100 

1,100 

50,800 

205,100 

147,300 

221,800 

65,400 

57,000 

267,900 

196,500 

14,000 

123,300 

132,000 

244,100 

206,600 

40,000 

208,100 

295,900 

155,600 

136,200 

152,100 



TOTAL 
TAX 

2,528.88 
3,116.00 

984.00 

257.48 
4,083.60 

209.92 
2,409.16 
4,539.52 
3,184.88 
1,767.92 
1,403.84 

301.76 
1,164.40 
2,033.60 
2,427.20 
1,807.28 
5,154.52 
3 f 644.08 
1,982.76 
4,331.24 
1,715.44 
1,392.36 
2,261.56 
1,316.92 
1,353.00 

337.84 

4,323.04 

47.56 

3,352.16 

3,608.00 

44.28 

6.56 

47.56 

34.44 

18.04 

833.12 
3,363.64 
2,415.72 
3,637.52 
1,072.56 

934.80 
A, 393. 56 
3,222.60 

229.60 
2,022.12 
2,164.80 
4,003.24 
3,388.24 

656.00 
3,412.84 
4,852.76 
2,551.84 
2,233.68 
2,494.44 



221 



• PRIMARY 


OWNER 




RASH IN 


LOUIS 


N 


RAWSON 


EDWARD 


B 


RAY 


KENNETH 


J 


REDMOND ROSEMARY 


KEOUGH 




REECE 


RICHARD 


C 


REIO 


CYNTHIA 


J 


REIDER 


W JAMES 




REINHERZ 


BERNARD 


M 


REINHERZ 


ELLIS 


L 


REISER 


GEORGE 




REISER 


GEORGE 




RELIANCE DEVELOPMENT CO 




PELMAN 


ARNOLD 


S 


REPKO 


BRUCE 




RESERVOIR NURSING HOME INC 




RESNICK 


CHARLES 


H 


RICCI 


LOUIS 




RICC I 


LOUIS 




RICCI 


RUSSELL 


J 


RICCI 


RUSSELL 


J 


RICE 


CLIFTON 


V 


RICE 


DAVID 


8 


RICE 


PAUL 


G 


RICE JR 


JAMES 


F 


RICHARDSON 


FREDERICK 


C 


PIKER 


E WILLIAM 




RISCH 


MARTIN 


D 


RISLEY 


CURTIS 


A 


PUSHER 


JOHN 


A 


RIZZO JR 


WILLIAM 


J 


ROBB 


STEPHEN 


J 


ROBBINS 


FREDERICK 


J 


ROBB INS 


ROLAND 


W 


ROBEY 


HARRIET 




ROBINSON 


DORA 


A 


RODMAN 


PAUL 


N 


POEHR 


GEORGE 


L 


ROGERS 


A LEWIS 




ROGERS 


ALFRED 


P 


ROGERS 


HARRIET 


J 


ROGERS 


JOSEPH 


H 


ROGERS 


MABELLE 


/ 


ROGERSON 


HENRY 


S 


ROLFE 


EDWARD 




ROLLINS JR 


JAMES 


L 


ROLLINS JR 


JAMES 


L 


ROOD 


JANE 




ROSE 


JAMES 




ROSEN 


ESTHER 


L 


ROSEN 


JOSEPH 




ROSEN 


PAUL 




ROSENTHAL 


RICHARD 




POSENWALC 


HAROLO 





VALUATION LIST FOR FISCAL 1983-1984 
REAL ESTATE 



TOTAL 
VALUE 



TOTAL 
TAX 



169,300 
136,800 
116,000 

157, 60C 
192,700 
132,100 
184,300 
37 6,500 
185,100 
208,300 

17,600 

900 

218,900 

71,000 

300 

236,100 

1,800 

169,000 

175,000 

10,60C 
101,400 
144,000 
103,300 

98,200 
136,500 
134,100 
121,300 
136,000 
27 6,700 
114,900 
10 7,200 
138,500 

84,800 

16 7,60 
76,100 

293,700 
323f 10G 
226,600 

17 8,400 
132,000 

44,000 
174,600 
104,000 
144,400 
3,700 
153,700 

92,300 
117,800 
132,100 
176,100 
102,300 
134,700 
220,000 



2,776,52 
2,243,52 
1,902.40 

2,584.64 
3,160.28 
2,166.44 
3,022,52 
6,174.60 
3,035.64 
3,416.12 

28 8.64 

14.76 

3,589.96 

1,164.40 

4.92 

3,872.04 

29.52 

2,771.60 

2,870.00 

173.84 
1,662.96 
2,361.60 
1,694.12 
1,610.48 
2,238.60 
2,199.24 
1,989.32 
2,230.40 
4,537.88 
1,884.36 
1,758.08 
2,271.40 
1,390.72 
2,748.64 
1,248.04 
4,816.68 
5,298.84 
3,716.24 
2,925.76 
2,164.80 

72 1 . 60 
2,863.44 
1,705.60 
2,368.16 
60.68 
2,520.68 
1,513.72 
1,931.92 
2,166.44 
2,888.04 
1,677.72 
2,209.08 
3,608.00 



222 



VALUATION LIST FOR FISCAL 1983-1984 
REAL ESTATE 





UMARY 






ROSS 


•-——«»<——■ 


PAUL 


F 


ROSS 




WILLIAM 


C 


ROSSBACH 




LEOPOLD 


J 


ROSS BACH 




LEOPOLD 


J 


ROSSITER 




SELINA 


G 


ROSSONl 




JOHN 


P 


ROSSONI 




JOHN 


P 


ROSSONl 




JOHN 


P 


ROSSONl 




PAOLA 


M 


ROTH 




DAVID 


A 


ROW 




RONALD 


V 


ROWE 




STAND ISH 


S 


ROY 




EUGENE 


u 


ROY 




SHIRLEY 


I 


RUOIN 




N ARTHUR 




RUONICK 




MITCHELL 


K 


RUGO 




HENRY 


J 


RURAL LANO 


FOUND 


OF LINCOLN 




RURAL LANO 


FOUNDATION 




RUSSELL 




MARY-ELLEN 


H 


RUSSELL 




WILLIAM 


B 


RYAN 




ALICE 


B 


RYAN 




ALICE 


E 


RYAN 




FRANK 


A 


RYAN 




JAMES 


J 


RYAN 




WILLIAM 


F 


RYER 




RUSSELL 


E 


SABBAG 




ARTHUR 




SACKNOFF 




ERIC 


J 


SALMON 




WALTER 


J 


SALVINI 




GAIL 


P 


SANADI 




D RAO 




SANDY POND 


TRUST 






SANDY POND 


TRUST 






SANDY POND 


TRUST 






SANDY POND 


TRUST 






SANDY POND 


TRUST 






SANDY POND 


TRUST 






SANDY POND 


TRUST 






SANDY POND 


TRUST 






SANDY POND 


TRUST 






SANTA 




CECELIA 


F 


SARGENT 




DENNIS 


S 


SARTORI 




LOUIS 


R 


SARTOR I 




LOUIS 


R 


SATTERFIELD 


CHARLES 


N 


SAVAGE 




ORRIN 


T 


SAVAS 




PETER 


G 


SAWTELL 




CLEMENT 


C 


SCHATZBERG 




ALAN 


F 


SCHEFF 




ANDREW 




SCHEFF 




BENSON 


H 


SCHEFF 




BENSON 


H 


SCHEFT 




WILLIAM 


A 



TOTAL 
VALUE 

203,400 
170,100 
151,200 
159,400 
173,100 

17,000 
7,500 
196,100 
104,000 
246,900 
159,300 
163,000 

78,700 

80,700 

138,600 

176,800 

208,300 

1,851,600 

82,900 

160,700 

315,500 

121,900 

9,60C 

93,800 
110,900 
164,500 
137,700 
108,600 
164,500 
185,200 
163,400 

80,000 
186,000 

82,600 
195,000 

30,200 
316,800 
129,900 

70,900 
353,400 
900 
146,800 
165,900 
178,800 

27,000 
173,500 
136,500 
150,000 
150,300 
180,800 

63,500 

15,000 
159,300 
167,400 



TOTAL 
TAX 

3,335,76 

2,789.64 
2,479.68 
2,614.16 
2,838.84 

278.80 

123.00 
3,216.04 
1,705.60 
4,049.16 
2,612.52 
2,673.20 
1,290.68 
1,323.48 
2,273.04 
2,899.52 
3,416.12 
30,366.24 
1,359.56 
2,635.48 
5, 174.20 
1,999.16 

157.44 
1,538.32 
1,818.76 
2,697.80 
2,258.28 
1,781.04 
2,697.80 
3,037.28 
2,679.76 
1,312.00 
3,050.40 
1,354.64 
3,198.00 

495.28 
5,195.52 
2,130.36 
1,162.76 
5,795.76 
14.76 
2,407.52 
2,720.76 
2,932.32 

442.80 
2,845.40 
2,238.60 
2,460.00 
2,464.92 
2,965.12 
1,041.40 

246.00 
2,612.52 
2,745.36 



223 



VALUATION LIST FOR FISCAL 1983-1984 
REAL ESTATE 



— PRIMARY 


OWNER 


~** 


SCHEUER 


HARRY 


*•* ' 


SCHILDBACH 


MURIEL 




SCHILOBACH 


MURIEL 




SCHLIEMANN 


PETER 


C 


SCHMID 


WIL FRIED 




SCHMID 


WILFRIED 




SCHMID 


WILFRIED 




SCHUDY 


ROBERT 


B 


SCHWANN 


WILLIAM 




SCHWANN EXECUTOR 


WILLIAM 




SCHWARTZ 


EDWARD 


A 


SCHWARTZ 


JUDAH 


L 


SCHWARZ 


FRANCIS 


C 


SCOTT 


BRUCE 


R 


SCOTT 


ELEANOR 


B 


SEAVER 


JOHN 


D 


SEDERQUIST 


DOUGLAS 


A 


SEDGWICK 


HAROLD BEND 




SEECKTS 


EHLERT 


W 


SEECKTS 


EHLERT 


W 


SEECKTS E WILLIAM € ELEANOR 


R 


SEELEY 


GEORGE 


W 


SEGAL 


ROBERT 


M 


SELLANO 


JAMES 





SEMERJIAN 


EVAN 


Y 


SEVEN MILL ST 






SEVILLE 


ALFRED 


R 


SEWALL 


STEVEN 


H 


SEXTON 


MAURICE 


J 


SHAFFER 


WILLIAM 


A 


SHALLAH 


GEORGE 




SHAMSAI 


JAVID 




SHANSKY 


DAVID 




SHAPIRO 


DAVID 




SHAPSE 


STEVEN 


N 


SHARPE 


JOHN 


G 


SHEA 


WILLIAM 


J 


SHEEHAN 


GERALD 


G 


SHELDON 


MARY 


W 


SHENTON 


ROBERT 




SHEPARD 


G DUDLEY 




SHUMAN 


MARK 


D 


SICHEL 


ENID 




SILVERSTEIN 


FRED 


P 


SIMMS 


MARGARET 


J 


SIMON 


MICHAEL 


P 


SIMONDS 


RAYMOND 




SIMOURIAN 


JOHN 




SISSON 


JOHN 


H 


SISSON 


JOHN 


H 


SKINNER 


LOUIS 


T 


SLAVIN 


GERALD 


D 


SLAYTER 


HENRY 


S 


SMETHURST 


CHESTER 


D 



TOTAL 
VALUE 

138,400 

45,700 

66,600 

27 7,800 

264,500 

44,000 

84,000 

62,500 

148,000 

78,600 

75,200 

15 5,300 

231,100 

250,200 

144,700 

172,400 

122,900 

171,400 

120,500 

64,800 

18,500 

108,900 

145,500 

91,700 

207,900 

253,600 

152,600 

267,100 

88,200 

110,500 

65,100 

40,000 

171,600 

178,600 

71,700 

134,000 

101,500 

115,500 

157,500 

233,500 

122,000 

238,200 

133,300 

121,100 

94,900 

146,100 

87,900 

193,300 

15,800 

202,600 

390,300 

92,900 

124,600 

39,600 



TOTAL 
TAX 

2,269.76 

749.48 
1,092.24 
4,555.92 
4,337.80 

721.60 
1,377.60 
1,025.00 
2,427.20 
1,289.04 
1,233.28 
2,546.92 
3,790.04 
4,103.28 
2,373.08 
2,827.36 
2,015.56 
2,810.96 
1,976.20 
1,062.72 

303.40 
1,785.96 
2,386.20 
1,503.88 
3,409.56 
4,159.04 
2,502.64 
4,380.44 
1,446.48 
1,812.20 
1,067.64 

656.00 
2,814.24 
2,929.04 
1,175.88 
2,197.60 
1,664.60 
1,894.20 
2,583.00 
3,829.40 
2,000.80 
3,906.48 
2,186.12 
1,986.04 
1,556.36 
2,396.04 
1,441.56 
3,170.12 

259.12 
3,322.64 
6,400.92 
1,523.56 
2,043.44 

649.44 



224 



VALUATION LIST FOR FISCAL 1983-1984 
REAL ESTATE 









SMITH 


ALAN 


B 


SMITH 


ARTHUR 


D 


SMITH 


CARL 


D 


SMITH 


COLIN L M 




SMITH 


CONVERSE 


B 


SMITH 


HAROLD DEAN 




SMITH 


PETER 


S 


SMITH 


STEVEN 


A 


SMITH 


SUMNER 




SMITH 


WILLIAM 


J 


SMITH TR 


DORIS HALL 




SMULOWICZ 


BRONISLAW 




SNELLING 


CHARLES 


A 


SNELLING 


HOWARD 




SNELLING 


JACQUELYN 


H 


SNELLING 


JESSICA 




SNELLING 


JOHN 


R 


SNELLING 


NORMAN 


J 


SNIDER 


GRETA 


W 


SNOW 


ROBERT 


C 


SOC FOR THE PRESERVATION OF 




SOLAR 


BARRY 




SOLAR 


ROBERT 


L 


SOLMAN III 


FRED 


J 


SPAETH 


DANIEL 


A 


SPEEN 


GEORGE 




SPENCER 


HENRY 


W 


SPENCER 


HENRY 


w 


SPERLING 


ARNOLD 


L 


SPINOLER 


JAMES 


W 


SPINOLER 


JAMES 


w 


SPOCK 


MICHAEL 




SPREAOBURY 


PETER 


E 


SPREAOBURY 


ROBERTA 


I 


SQUIBB 


MILDRED 


G 


SQUIRE 


JAMES 


R 


STAM JR 


ALLAN 




ST AM JR 


ALLAN 


C 


STANKARD JR 


CHARLES 


£ 


STANZLER 


ALAN 


L 


STANZLER 


ALAN 


L 


STASON 


WILLIAM 


B 


STASZESKY 


BARBARA 


F 


STATHOS 


CHARLES 


A 


STEBBINS REALTY 


TRUST 




ST EC HER 


ROBERT 


W 


STEIN 


FREEMAN 




STEINETZ 


SCOTT 




STEINHILPER 


FRANK 


A 


STEVENS JR 


EDMUND 




STEVENSON 


HOWARD 


H 


STEVENSON 


HOWARD 


H 


STEVENSON 


HOWARD 


H 


STEVENSON 


HOWARD 


H 



225 



TOTAL 
VALUE 

228,400 
149,000 

99,700 
175,600 
188,400 
142,100 
300 
101,200 
340,400 
115,000 
130,500 
143,500 
120,000 
115,400 
148,800 
180,400 
102,100 
118,800 

7 2,60C 
134,000 

81,400 
202,400 
173,500 
105, 50C 
115,300 
248,800 
206,200 

2 6,300 
188,900 

10,600 
22 8,000 
141,900 
215,900 
137,800 

71,100 
217,800 

19,200 
236,300 
132,300 
26 3,300 

17,600 

211,900 

150,000 

213,000 

100,000 

188,300 

106,900 

131,600 

245,900 

213,400 

3,600 

3,600 

2,500 

4,100 



TOTAL 
TAX 

3,745.76 
2,443.60 
1,635.08 
2,879.84 
3,089.76 
2,330.44 
4.92 
1,659.68 
5,582.56 
1,886.00 
2,140.20 
2,353.40 
1,968.00 
1,892.56 
2,440.32 
2,958.56 
1,674.44 
1,948.32 
1,190.64 
2,197.60 
1,334.96 
3,319.36 
2,845.40 
1,730.20 
1,890.92 
4,080.32 
3,381.68 

431.32 
3,097.96 

173.84 
3,739.20 
2,327.16 
3,540.76 
2,259.92 
1,166.04 
3,571.92 

314.88 
3,875.32 
2,169.72 
4,318.12 

288.64 

3,475.16 

2,460.00 

3,493.20 

1,640.00 

3,088.12 

1,753.16 

2,158.24 

4,032.76 

3,499.76 

59.04 

59.04 

41.00 

67.24 



VALUATION LIST FOR FISCAL 1983-1984 
REAL ESTATE 



— — PRIMARY OWNER 



STEVENSON 

STEVENSON 

STEWART JR 

STIMMELL 

STONE 

STRATFORC RE 

STRATTON 

STREET 

STRIKER 

SUBSICK 

SUGAR 

SULLIVAN 

SUSSMAN 

SUTHERLAND 

SVETZ 

SWAIN 

SWAIN 

SWANSCN 

SWEENEY JR 

SWETT 

SWIFT 

SYKES 

SYLVIA 

TANG 

TANNERT 

TARTAGLIA 

TASCHIOGLOU 

TATLOCK 

TAUNTON-RIG8 

TAVILLA 

TAYLOR 

TAYLOR 

TAYLOR 

TAYLOR 

TAYLOR 

TAYLOR 

TEABO 

TEABO 

TELLING 

TELLING 

TENNECO INC 

TENNICAN 

TERRELL 

TETREAULT 

THAYER 

THOMAS 

THOMAS JR 

THOMPSON 

THOMPSON 

THOMPSON 

THOMPSON JR 

THOMSON ANNE 

THORNE 

THORNTON 



JOHN P 

PHILIP D 

FRANCIS J 

DAVID H 

BARRY S 

ALTY CO INC 

MICHAEL A 

EARLE B 

WILLIAM W 

WALTER J 

ELIZABETH R 

GLADYS G 
JOSEPH 

ROBERT L 

PAUL J 

DOUGLAS M 

DOUGLAS M 

RICHARD E 

CARL F 

JOAN D- 
PHYLLIS 

DAVID F 

LAWRENCE N 

THOMAS L 
H MICHAEL 
GIOVANNI 

KEMON P 
RICHARD 

Y R OG ER 

J DAVID 
BARRY 

EDWARD S 

FREDERICK B 

LILLIAN C 

TIMOTHY A 
W ROYCE 

PRINCE C 

PRINCE C 
IRVING 
IRVING 

MICHAEL L 

JOHN H 

CLAIRE F 

HENRY H 

GORDON W 

GEORGE W 

DONALD J 
HARRY 

LAWRENCE E 
G BROOKS 
PEARMAIN 

KAREN OSHANA 
PETER 



TOTAL 
VALUE 

180 f 900 
212 t 900 
144,400 
109,700 
159,300 
226,300 
117,800 
159,200 
101,900 
307,900 
112,000 

74,700 
181,900 
171,600 
163,600 
159,900 
1,100 
101,100 
155,000 
145,500 
203,200 
141,000 
129,500 
125,200 
147,300 

93,400 
206,800 
165,700 
143,500 
337,700 
134,700 
17 6,300 
149,700 
126,800 
115, 30C 
153,100 

89,700 

7,300 

16 5,100 

15,400 
4,400 
237,700 
103,500 
153,800 
144,000 
129,100 

79,700 
192,400 
279,400 
205,200 
101,100 

89,200 

147,200 

6,700 



TOTAL 
TAX 

2,966.76 
3,491,56 
2,368,16 
1,799.08 
2,612.52 
3,711.32 
1,931.92 
2,610.88 
1,671.16 
5,049.56 
1,836.80 
1,225.08 
2,983.16 
2,814.24 
2,683.04 
2,622.36 
18.04 
1,658.04 
2,542.00 
2,386.20 
3,332.48 
2,312.40 
2,123.80 
2,053.28 
2,415.72 
1,531.76 
3,391.52 
2,717.48 
2,353.40 
5,538.28 
2,209.08 
2,891.32 
2,455.08 
2,079.52 
1,890.92 
2,510.84 
1,471.08 

119.72 
2,707.64 

252.56 
72.16 
3,898.28 
1,697.40 
2,522.32 
2,361.60 
2,117.24 
1,307.08 
3,155.36 
4,582.16 
3,365.28 
1,658.04 
1,462.88 
2,414.08 

109.88 



226 





VALUATION 


LIST FOR FISCAL 


1983-1984 


_ OD T 




REAL ESTATE 


TOTAL 
VALUE 






THREE S REALTY TRUST 




456,000 


THUROW 


LESTER 


C 


332,000 


THUROW 


LESTER 


c 


255,500 


TILBURG 


WILLIAM 


E 


153,100 


TINDER 


GLENN 




211,600 


TINGEY JR 


WILLIAM 


J 


172,400 


TING LEY 


FREDERICK 


M 


124,100 


TITLEBAUM 


EARL 


S 


150,000 


TITUS 


WILLIAM 


A 


52,000 


TOO 


JANE 


N 


135,500 


TODO 


CONRAD 




315,900 


TOOD 


CONRAD 




8,500 


TODD 


EVELETH 


R 


94,000 


TOKSOZ 


M NAFI 




50,600 


TOLER 


LOUISE 


C 


100,000 


TOMASTC 


MICHAEL 


G 


220,800 


TONG 


PIN 




118,200 


TORODE 


HERBERT 


L 


98,500 


TORRI 


EDWARO 


F 


161,500 


TORT I JR 


MAURICE 


L 


184,500 


TOUBORG 


JENS N F 




418,500 


TRACEY 


ELIZABETH 


M 


66,300 


TRACEY 


ELIZABETH 


M 


25,20C 


TRACEY 


ELIZABETH 


M 


77,500 


TRACEY 


ELIZABETH 


M 


15,400 


TRACEY 


ELIZABETH 


M 


27,000 


TRACEY 


ROBERT 


J 


79,600 


TRACEY 


ROBERT 


J 


164,300 


TRACEY 


ROBERT 


J 


144,400 


TRAVERS 


PAUL 




177,100 


TREVELYAN 


EOIN 


W 


134,40 


TROISI 


EUGENE 


A 


152,100 


TROISI 


FERDINAND 


L 


95,200 


TUCKER 


JANET 


L 


8,400 


TUNNELL 


RAYMONO 


W 


3,200 


TUNNELL 


RAYMOND 


w 


150,600 


TURANO 


ANTHONY 


J 


16,600 


TURNER 


JAMES 


R 


129,200 


TUROWSKI 


EDMUND 


J 


12,100 


TUROWSKI 


EDMUND 


J 


261,500 


TUTKO 


STEPHEN 


D 


271,900 


TYLER 


PRISCILLA 


D 


168,000 


TYLER WATSON 


HEIRS OF 




64,700 


1 U S DYNAMICS 


REALTY TRUST 




11,400 


1 UMBRELLC 


CARMEL 


V 


94,50C 


1 UMBRELLO 


FRANCIS 




125,800 


1 URETSKY 






76,500 


I URNER 


JOSEPH 


F 


116,100 


1 VAGLIANO 


ANDRE 




157,500 


\ VALLEY POND 


REALTY TRUST 




400 


\ VALLEY PCNO 


REALTY TRUST 




7,300 


V VALLEY PCND 


REALTY TRUST 




23,900 


\ VAN LEER 


RACHEL 


D 


27,200 


\ VANBUREN JR 


HAROLD 


S 


246,200 



TOTAL 
TAX 

7 9 478.40 
5,444,80 
4,190.20 
2,510.84 
3,470.24 
2,827.36 
2,035.24 
2,460.00 

85 2.80 
2,222.20 
5,180.76 

139.40 
1,541.60 

829.84 
1,640.00 
3,621.12 
1,938.48 
1,615.40 
2,648.60 
3,025.80 
6,863.40 
1,087.32 

413.28 
1,271.00 

252.56 

442.80 
1,305.44 
2,694.52 
2,368.16 
2,904.44 
2,204.16 
2,494.44 
1,561.28 

137.76 

52.48 

2,469.84 

272.24 
2,118.88 

198.44 
4,288.60 
4,459.16 
2,755.20 
1,061.08 

186.96 
1,549.80 
2,063.12 
1,254.60 
1,904.04 
2,583.00 
6.56 

119.72 

391.96 

446.08 
4,037.68 



227 



VALUATION 



LIST FOR FISCAL 
REAL ESTATE 



1983-1984 



PRIMARY OWNER 



VANLEER 


HANS 




VANLEER 


HANS 


L 


VANLEER 


HANS 


L 


VANLEER 


R KARL 




VENIER 


ETTORE 


P 


VENIER 


ETTORE 


P 


VERCOLLONE 


EDMUND 


S 


VERNON 


RICHARD 




VET 


MARIA 


F 


VITALE 


JOSEPH 


A 


VOCKEL 


VIRGINIA 




VON MERTENS 


PETER 


B 


VONMERTENS 


ERNEST 


K 


WADSWORTH 


VIRGINIA 


D 


WALES 


BETTY 


R 


WALES 


R LANGDON 




WALES 


ROGER 


S 


WALKER 


JOHN 


F 


WALKER 


SIDNEY 


A 


WALL WORK 


EDWIN 


N 


WALSH 


PATRICIA 


R 


WALTER 


CHaRLTON 


M 


WALTON 


FRANK 


E 


WANG 


AN 




WANG 


AN 




WANG 


AN 




WANG 


AN 




WANG 


AN 




WANG 


CHIU-CHEN 




WANG 


FREDERICK 


A 


WANG 


FREDERICK 


A 


WARD 


JANE 


L 


WARD 


WALTER 


B 


WARD JR 


WALTER 


B 


WARNER 


HENRIETTA 


S 


WARNER 


HENRIETTA 


S 


WARNER 


PATRICIA 


R 


WARREN 


DUNCAN 





WARREN 


JOAN 


B 


WATSON 


JOHN 


P 


WAUGH 


JOHN 


S 


WEBB 


ROBERT 


H 


WEBSTER 


DAVID 




WEIBEL 


EUGENE 


A 


WEIGEL 


LYNN 


B 


WEINGARTEN 


JOSEPH 




WEISMAN 


RODGER 


E 


WELCH 


VERNON 


F 


WENGREN 


MARGARET 


L 


WENGREN ET AL 


RICHARD 




WENGREN ET ALS 


RICHARD 




WESTCOTT 


VERNON 


C 


WEYL ALAN J £ 


JANE B 




WHALEN 


WILLIAM 


B 



TOTAL 
VALUE 

1,400 
169,800 

10,000 
191,400 

26,900 
211,200 
114,100 
269,100 
107,900 
119,400 
101,400 
177,500 
105, 50C 
174,000 
104,000 
154,700 
116,900 
164,000 
194,500 
124,700 
126,800 
224,800 

80,200 

20,000 

18, 100 

297,600 

3,200 

27,800 
220,300 
263,500 
104,000 

97,400 

96,600 
109,900 
152,300 

18,600 
140,100 
166,100 
104,500 

67,300 
167,700 
121,500 
217,300 

73,200 
253,800 
171,500 
314,700 
107,600 
276,000 
6,500 

16,500 
109,100 
257,400 

98,100 



TOTAL 
TAX 



22 
2,784 

164 
3,138 

441 
3,463 
1,871 
4,413 
1,769 
1,958 
1,662 
2,911 
1,730 
2,853 
1,705 
2,537 
1,917 
2,689 
3,189 
2,045 
2,079 
3,686 
1,315 

328 

296 

4,880 

52 

455 
3,612 
4 t 321 
1,705 
1,597 
1,584 
1,802 
2,497 

305 
2,29 7 
2,724 
1,713 
1,103 
2,750 
1,992 
3,563 
1,200 
4,162 
2,812 
5,161 
1,764 
4,526 

106 

270 
1,789 
4,221 
1,608 



• 96 
.72 
.00 
.96 

• 16 
.68 
.24 
.24 

• 56 
.16 
.96 
.00 
.20 
.60 
.60 
.08 
.16 
.60 
.80 
.08 
.52 
.72 

• 28 
.00 
.84 
.64 
.48 
.92 
.92 
.40 
.60 
.36 
.24 
.36 
.72 
.04 
.64 
.04 
.80 
.72 
.28 
.60 
.72 
.48 
.32 

• 60 
.08 
.64 
.40 
.60 
.60 
.24 
.36 
.84 



228 





VALUATION LIST FOR FISCAL 


1983-1984 




=. PRIMARY 




REAL ESTATE 


TOTAL 
VALUE 


TOTAL 
TAX 






WHATLEY 


ROBERT BOYD 




108,800 


1,784.32 


WHEELER 


BELLA 


C 


106,500 


1,746.60 


WHEELOCK 


SUSAN 


K 


208,800 


3,424.32 


WHITE 


ELINOR 




152,400 


2,499.36 


WHITE 


JAMES 


B 


18,000 


295.20 


WHITE 


JAMES 


B 


316,200 


5,185.68 


WHITE 


JAMES 


B 


5,500 


90.20 


WHITE 


JAMES 


B 


6,000 


98.40 


WHITE 


KATHERINE 


S 


300 


4.92 


WHITE 


KATHERINE 


S 


252,400 


4,139.36 


WHITE 


ROBERT 


E 


132,700 


2,176.28 


WHITE 


THOMAS 


J 


327,300 


5,367.72 


WHITE JCHN R £ G 


INA R 




240,300 


3,940.92 


WHITESIDE 


ELINOR 


I 


140,100 


2,297.64 


WHITMAN 


LAWRENCE 


W 


188,800 


3,096.32 


WHITMAN 


ROSS 




280,400 


4,598.56 


WHITMORE 


MARY 


D 


236,600 


3,880.24 


WIEDERHOLD 


PIETER 


R 


247,400 


4,057.36 


WIGGIN 


RICHARD 


C 


202,200 


3,316.08 


WILDES 


ROBERT 


S 


126,000 


2,066.40 


WILEY 


DAVID 


s 


168,400 


2,761.76 


WILFERT 


FRED 


J 


90,300 


1,480.92 


WILLEMIN 


JULIAN 


V 


97,40C 


1,597.36 


WILLIAMS 


JANE COOPER 




108,600 


1,781.04 


WILLIAMS 


WILLIAM 


D 


158,500 


2,599.40 


WILLIAMS JR 


EDWIN 


L 


138,300 


2,268.12 


WILLIAMS JR 


WILLIAM 


G 


85,000 


1,394.00 


WILLMANN 


WERNER 


s 


168,900 


2,769.96 


WILSON 


DONALD 


H 


15 8,800 


2,604.32 


WILSON 


ROBERT 


A 


65,000 


1,066.00 


WINCHELL 


GORDON 


D 


15,200 


249.28 


WINCHELL 


GORDON 


D 


800 


13.12 


WINCHELL 


GORDON 


D 


18,700 


306.68 


WINCHELL 


GORDON 


D 


4,50C 


73.80 


WINCHELL 


GORDON 


D 


79,800 


1,308.72 


WINCHELL 


GORDON 


D 


264,000 


4,329.60 


WINCHELL 


GORDON 


D 


146,600 


2,404.24 


WINCHELL 


GORDON 


D 


192,900 


3,163.56 


WINCHELL 


GUILBERT 


s 


103,500 


1,697.40 


WINCHELL 


RICHARD 


P 


200,500 


2,288.20 


WINSHIP 


LEE 


C 


136,000 


2,230.40 


WINSHIP 


THOMAS 




286,900 


4,705.16 


WITHERS Y 


MARIANNE J 


H 


139,300 


2,284.52 


WOFFORD 


JOHN 


G 


158,100 


2,592.84 


WOLF JR 


ROBERT GRANT 


96,200 


1,577.68 


WONG 


JUDITH 


A 


95,500 


1,566.20 


WOO 


ROBERT 




148,300 


2,432.12 


WOO 


WAY DONG 




170,700 


2,799.48 


WOOD 


HILVE 


V 


100,900 


1,654.76 


WOOD 


ROBERT 


M 


148,100 


2,428.84 


WOOD 


RONALD 


F 


115,400 


1,892.56 


WOOD 


VIRGINIA 


S 


29,000 


475.60 


WOOD JR 


GEORGE 


A 


112,900 


1,851.56 


WOODINGTON 


W GORDON 




148,200 


2,430.48 



229 



VALUATION LIST FOR FISCAL 1983-1984 
REAL ESTATE 



PRIMARY 


OWNER 




WOODS 


JANE 


Y 


WOODS 


KATHRYN 


R 


WORK 


FREDERIC C 


T 


WORK 


FREDERIC C 


T 


WORSHAM 


JACK 


L 


WRIGHT 


MALOR 




WU 


PEI RIN 




WU 


PEl-RIN 




WYATT 


PETER 


W 


YAGJIAN 


JACOB 




YEUELL 


KAY 


M 


YORE 


GEORGE 


P 


YOS 


JERROLD 


M 


YOUNG 


ANNE 




YOUNG 


G STE.WART 




YOUNG 


LEE 


A 


YOUNG 


MADELINE 


G 


YOUNG 


ROBIN 


C 


ZECH 


WILLIAM 


R 


ZEE 


MOLLY 


3 


ZEVIN 


ANNE 




ZIMMERMAN 


HERBERT 


E 


ZIMMERMAN 


ROBERT 


M 


ZUELKE 


LAURENCE 


W 



TOTAL 
VALUE 



TOTAL 
TAX 



110,000 
139*900 
338,600 
800 
163,800 
130,600 

80,000 
146,300 
13 0,300 

14,300 
157,700 

69,200 
102,700 
220,500 
138,000 
16 5,40 
164,100 
112,100 
156,800 
151,900 
152, 60C 
1,200 
224, 70C 
104,000 



1,804.00 
2,294,36 
5,553.04 

13.12 
2,686.32 
2,141.84 
1,312.00 
2,399.32 
2,136.92 
234.52 
2,586.28 
1,134.88 
1,684.28 
3,616.20 
2,263.20 
2,712.56 
2,691.24 
1,838.44 
2,571.52 
2,491.16 
2,502.64 

19.68 
3,685.08 
1,705.60 



230 



VALUATION LIST FOR FISCAL 1983-1984 
PERSONAL PROPERTY 

PRIMARY OWNER TOTAL TOTAL 

VALUE TAX 

ALGONQUIN GAS TRANSMISSION CO. 217,542 3,567.69 

AMERICAN TEL & TEL COMPANY 80,900 1,326.76 

BACHRACH JR ALAN 1,000 16.40 

BAY-BANK/ NEWTON WALTHAM 25,700 421.48 

BOSTON EDISON COMPANY 4,781,700 78,419.88 

BOSTON GAS COMPANY 900,000 14,760.00 

CAPPETTA CHARLES J 1,300 21.32 

COBBLER & CORDWAINER 700 11.48 

COUNTRY HAIR FASHIONS 1,600 26.24 

D'ALLEVA, CARMINE 700 11.48 

HARRINGTON JR WINTHROP W 3,400 55.76 

HERTHEL LAURENCE 700 11.48 

KEEVIL JR CHARLES S 4,200 68.88 

LEE JOHN 2,500 41.00 

LINCOLN BEAUTY SALON 2,500 41.00 

LINCOLN CROSSING RESTAURANT 1,200 19.68 

LINCOLN PLUMBING & HEATING 800 13.12 

NEW ENGLAND TEL & TEL 1,747,800 28,663.92 

O'CONNOR JOHN T 2,500 41.00 

PAPPAS LILLIAN 1,200 19.68 

TENNECO, INC. 479,085 7,856.99 

WEIGEL, LYNN 4,200 68.88 

WEST NEWTON SAVINGS BANK 7,300 119.72 

WINCHELL GORDON 4,200 68.88 



231 



COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 

George Hibben 
Virginia M. Niles 
William B. Russell 



DONALD GORDON RECREATION FUND 



Cash Account 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1982 1,478.79 

Interest income 7/1/82-6/30/83 502.89 

Interest applied to amortize bond purchase premiums 1.52 

Less payments: 

Safe deposit box rent 4.50 
Bank interest allowed to accumulate 263.91 
Deposited in MMDT, Composite Trust Fund 400.00 
Grant to Magic Garden, per order Selectmen 1,000.00 1,668.41 

Cash balance at June 30, 1983 $ 314.79 

Cash and Securities at June 30, 1983 

Bay Bank/Middlesex Bank $ 314.79 

MMDT, Composite Trust Fund 3,042.18 

1,000 Southern Bell Telephone 4% 10/1/83 1,000.00 

1,000 American Tel. & Tel. Co. 4-5/8% 4/1/85 1,000.00 

1,000 Southern California Edison Co. 4%% 2/15/90 1,001.04 

1,000 Virginia Electric & Power 4-1/8% 10/1/86 1,004.20 

1,000 Fed'l National Mortgage Assn. 7.05% 6/10/92 990.00 

$ 8,352.21 



Accumulated income 3,143.79 

Principal 5,208.42 

$ 8,352.21 



232 



LINCOLN SCHOLARSHIP FUND 



Cash Account 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1982 



367.44 



Income received 7/1/82 - 6/30/83 
Dividends and interest 
General Appeal 
Old Town Hall Corp. 
Ogden Codman Trust 
Eleanor Tead Fund 

Interest applied to amortize bond premium 
Refund of grant 
Transferred from savings 



5,068.28 

3,644.00 

500.00 

12,000.00 

1,120.00 



22,332.28 

38.34 

450.00 

28,000.00 

$51,188.06 



Payments, per order of Trustees 
82-83 Grants 
Safe deposit box rent 
Interest allowed to accumulate 
Printing and mailing expense 
Brooks Scholarship Awards 
Purchase of Bonds 
Transferred to savings - MMDT 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1983 



11,100.00 

4.50 

2,880.37 

415.83 

27.50 

20,751.64 

13,000.00 



48,179.84 
$ 3,008.22 



Cash and Securities at June 30, 1983 

BayBank Trust 

Composite Trust Fund 

1,000 Pacific Gas & Electric Co. 5% 6/1/89 

1,000 Southern Cal. Edison Co. 4-1/2% 2/15/90 

5,000 Ohio Power Co. 5% 1/1/96 

6,000 Southern N. E. Telephone Co. 5-3/4% 1/1/96 

120 Shares Exxon Corp 

100 Shares Northern Indiana Service Co. 

5,000 Commonwealth Edison 8% 8/1/01 

10,000 U. S. Treasury 

10,000 Fed. Home Loan Bank 



$ 3,008.22 

13,698.38 

1,000.52 

1,001.04 

4,987.50 

6,006.05 

3,016.85 

2,973.63 

4,868.75 

10,000.00 

10,100.00 

60,660.94 



Robert L. DeNormandie Fund 
Lincoln 4-H Horse Club Fund 
Ernest P. Neumann Memorial Fund 
Eleanor Tead Fund 
General Fund 



1,000.00 
1,770.00 
6,005.00 
1,120.00 
50,765.94 

$60,660.94 



233 



LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1982 
Income received 7/1/82-6/30/83 
Codman Library Trust Fund 
Mary Jane Murray Farnsworth 

and Murray P. Farnsworth Fund 
Alice Downing Hart and Olive 

Beatrice Floyd Fund 
Hugh Anthony Gaskill Fund 
John H. Pierce Library Fund 
George Russell Library Fund 
Abbie J. Stearns Library Fund 
George G. Tarbell Fund 
George G. and Eleanor F. Tarbell Fund 
C. Edgar and Elizabeth S. wheeler Fund 
John and Eleanor T. Carman Fund 
Lincoln Library Fund 
Thiessen Fund (Rental income) 
DeNormandie Fund (Rental income) 
Interest applied to amort, bond purch. prem. 

Withdrawn from MMDT 
Donations - Cannon 

- Olive Beatrice Floyd 

John and Eleanor T. Carman 



Less payments: 

Safe deposit box rent and bank charge 

Purchase of books - Cannon account 

Purchase of books - Thiessen Fund 

Jay Daly, Librarian, J. H. Pierce Fund 

Income allowed to accumulate 

Transferred to MMDT 

Purchased U. S. Treasury 10-1/8% 11/15/94 

Premium on bond 

Prepaid interest 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1983 



$ 1,782.75 



66.13 



131.33 



112.11 




16.82 




67.26 




56.49 




185.29 




167.84 




1,428.65 




103.75 




515.06 




150.41 




414.80 




55.73 




10.07 


3,481.74 




6,009.76 


200.00 




500.00 




18,000.00 


18,700.00 


$ 


29,974.25 


4.50 




204.75 




504.86 




67.26 




1,623.21 




19,850.00 




6,000.00 




22.50 




293.68 


28,570.76 


$ 


1,403.49 



Cash and S ecurities at June 30, ' 1983 

Principal 





Income on 




Deposit 


Cash on hand 




General funds on deposit 


225.26 


Cannon Fund 




Thiessen Fund 


76.50 


DeNormandie Fund 





236.14 
500.00 
365.59 



Total 



225.26 
236.14 
576.50 
365.59 



234 



Income on 
Deposit 



Principal 



Total 



Codman Fund 

MMDT- Composite Trust Fund 

Mary Jane Murray Farnsworth 
& Murray P. Farnsworth Fund 
MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 708.02 

Alice Downing Hart & Olive 
Beatrice Floyd Fund 
MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 458.06 

Hugh Anthony Gaskill Fund 

MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 58.65 

John H. Pierce Library Fund 

1,000 So. N. E. Tel Co. 5-3/4% '96 
MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 

George Russell Library Fund 

MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 318.88 

Abbie J. Stearns Library Fund 

MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 603.62 

1,000 Fed. Nat'l Mort. 6.40% '87 

George G. Tarbell Library Fund 

MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 207.42 

1,000 So. N. E. Tel. 5-3/4% '96 

1,000 So. Bell Tel. 4% '83 

1,000 West. Mass. Elec. 4-3/4% '87 

George G. & Eleanor F. Tarbell Fund 

MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 7,476.79 
10,000 DuQuesne Light 7% '87 

C. Edgar & Elizabeth S. Wheeler Fund 

MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 243.47 
1,000 Fed. Nat'l Mort. 6.40% '87 



860.02 



1,000.00 



1,000.00 



144.00 



1,000.00 
117.21 



415.74 



860.02 



1,708.02 



1,458.06 



202.65 



1,000.00 
117.21 



734.62 



Lincoln Library Fund 

MMDT- Composite Trust Fund 



(Gen.Fd. 874.40 
(Bk. Fd. 350.00 
1,000 So. N. E. Tel. 5-3/4% '96 



973.75 


1,577.37 


956.25 


956.25 


138.38 


345.80 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


75.00 


7,551.79 


9,925.00 


9,925.00 


273.52 


516.99 


956.25 


956.25 




1,224.40 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 



John & Eleanor T. Carman Fund 
MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 
6,000 U. S. Treasury 10-1/8% '94 



221.38 



12,000.00 12,221.38 
6,012.43 6,012.43 



$11,822.45 



$ 40,949.28 $ 52,771.73 



235 



GRAMMAR SCHOOL FUND 



Cash Account 



Interest income received 7/1/82-6/30/83 $ 134.62 

Withdrawn from MMDT 17.38 



JANE HAMILTON POOR SCHOLARSHIP FUND 



Cash Account 



Bank Deposits at June 30, 1983 



BayBank Middlesex 

MMDT, Composite Trust Fund 

Concord Cooperative Bank Term Certificate 



Accumulated income 

Interest on Term Certificate available to 

Lincoln Scholarship Fund 
Principal 



152.00 
Paid to Town of Lincoln 152.00 

$ 

Bank Deposits at June 30, 1983 
MMDT, Composite Trust Fund $1,265.69 



Principal 1,217.52 

Accumulated Income 48. 17 

$1,265.69 



Cash balance at June 30, 1982 $ 19.64 

Interest income 7/1/82-6/30/83 7.25 

Interest in Term Deposit 229.25 

$ 256.14 

Deduct : 

Bank interest allowed to accumulate 7.25 

Cash balance at June 30, 1983 $ 248.89 



248, 

87, 

2,700, 


.89 
.49 
.00 


3,036, 


.38 




1,572, 

229, 
1,235, 


.13 

.25 
.00 


$3,036. 


,38 





236 



JOHN TODD TRUST FUND 



Cash balance at 6/30/82 

Withdrawn from MMDT, Composite Trust Fund 32,372.04 

Interest - MMDT, Composite Trust Fund 502.13 

U. S. Treasury, 13-3/4% 1,914.54 

Fed. Farm Credit 15.20% 1,106.45 

Interest applied to amortize bond premiums 33.55 



35,928.71 



Less payments : 
Bonds purchased: 

U. S. Treasury 13-3/4% 5/15/92 

Fed. Farm Credit Bk. 15.20% 1/20/92 

Prepaid interest 

Premium (FFCB) 

Costs of purchase 
Interest allowed to accumulate 
Deposited in MMDT, Composite Trust Fund 
Paid to Bemis Fund u/w John Todd 
Cash balance at 6/30/83 



13,825.00 

15,000.00 

334.78 

637.50 

84.02 

502.13 

2,092.04 

3,453.24 



35,928.71 




Cash and Securities at June 30, 1983 



Bay Bank /Middle sex 

MMDT, Composite Trust Fund 

U. S. Treasury, 13-3/4% 5/15/92 

Fed. Farm Credit Bank 15.20% 1/20/92 



$ 

571.05 

13,825.00 

15,603.95 

$ 30,000.00 



Principal 



$ 30,000.00 



237 



D eCORDOVA SCHOOL EQUIPMENT FUND 

Cash Account 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1982 $ (3.86) 

Interest income 7/1/82-6/30/83 1,725.60 

Interest applied to amortize bond purchase premiums 2.86 





1,724.60 


4.48 




1,720.12 


1,724.60 



Deduct : 

Safe deposit box rent 

Paid to Town of Lincoln 7/1/82-6/30/83 

Cash balance at 6/30/83 $ 

Cash & Securities at June 30, 1983 

Bay Bank Middlesex $ 

MMDT, Composite Trust Fund 1,265.39 

3,000 Southern Bell Telephone 4% 10/1/83 3,000.00 

1,000 Idaho Power Co. 4^% 1/1/87 1,000.00 

2,000 Federal Nat'l Mortgage Assoc. 6.40% 12/11/87 1,912.50 

1,000 Pacific Tel & Tel Co. 4-3/8% 2/15/88 1,002.65 

2,000 General Telephone Co. 4-1/8% 3/1/88 2,003.50 

1,000 Pacific Gas & Electric Co. 5% 6/1/89 1,000.64 

1,000 Southern California Edison Co. 4%% 2/10/90 1,001.04 

4,000 Federal National Mortgage 7.05% 6/10/92 3,960.00 

2,000 Southern New England Telephone 5-3/4% 11/1/96 2,002.48 

1,000 American Tel. & Tel. 8-5/8% 2/1/07 978.75 

1,000 Commonwealth Edison 8% 8/1/01 973.75 

2,000 U. S. Treasury 12-5/8% 5/15/95 1,962.50 

3,000 U. S. Treasury 8-3/4% 11/15/08 2,925.00 

$24,988.22 



TRICENTENNIAL TRUST FUND 

Cash balance at June 30, 1982 . $ 1,450.43 

Interest income 7/1/82-6/30/83 116.11 

Cash balance at June 30, 1983 $ 1,567.14 

Accumulated income 567.14 

Principal 1,000.00 

$ 1,567.14 



238 



LINCOLN CONSERVATION FUND 



Cash Account 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1982 5.55 

Interest income 7/1/82-6/30/83 59.41 

$ 64.96 

Interest allowed to accumulate 59.41 

Cash balance at June 30, 1983 $ 5.55 

Bank Deposits at June 30, 1983 

Bay Bank/Middlesex 5.55 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 612.31 

$617.86 



ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR THE SILENT POOR 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at June 30, 1982 $ 121.16 

Interest income 7/1/82-6/30/83 74.47 

195.63 

Less interest allowed to accumulate 34.47 

$ 161.16 

Cash and Securities at June 30, 1983 

BayBank /Middle sex 161 . 16 

MMDT, Composite Trust Fund 355.43 

1,000 Southern Bell Telephone 4% 10/1/83 1,000.00 

$1,516.59 

Accumulated income 291.54 

Principal 1,225.05 

$1,516.59 



LAWRENCE W. GREEN FUND 

Cash balance at 6/30/82 

Contribution from LSA in memory, Lawrence W. Green 1,307.65 

Deposited in MMDT, Composite Trust Fund 1,307.65 

Cash balance at 6/30/83 



Bank Deposits at 6/30/83 
MMDT, Composite Trust Fund $1,307.65 

Principal $1,307.65 



239 



JOHN H. PIERCE LEGACY 



Cash balance at June 30, 1982 
Income received 7/1/82-6/30/83 

Interest on investments 

Interest on savings 

Elsie Pierce Trust 

Use of Pierce House 
Interest applied to amortize bond premiums 

TOTAL RECEIPTS 



$ 2,827.81 



9,351.90 

2,257.90 

3,136.07 

20,642.00 



35,387.87 
6.60 

$ 38,222.28 



Payments, per order of the Selectmen 

Medical assistance to needy townspeople 
60+ Health Clinic 
Pierce House Expenses 

Supplies and furnishings 

Repairs and maintenance 

Manager compensation 

Gas (Heating) 

Other utilities 

Mowing, Pierce Park grounds 

Rubbish removal 

Miscellaneous 

Major expenditures 

Interest allowed to accumulate 

Box rent 

Return of deposit 

TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS 

Cash balance at June 30, 1983 



2,554.43 
2,583.81 
10,298.99 
5,027.19 
1,944.57 



562.49 
741.62 



22,408.99 

1,913.00 

906.00 

501.19 

2,650.00 

2,208.80 

22.50 

350.00 

$ 32,264.59 

$ 5,957.69 



Cash and Securities at June 30, 1983 

Unrestricted as to Principal and Interest 

Bay Bank /Middles ex 
MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 
5,000 American Tel. & Tel. 4-3/8% 4/1/85 
1,000 Virginia Electric 4-1/8% 10/1/86 
3,000 Niagara Mohawk Power Co. 3-5/8% 5/1/86 
4,000 Federal Nat'l Mortgage 6.40% 12/11/87 
5,000 Pacific Tel. & Tel. 4-3/8% 8/15/88 
2,000 Federal Nat'l Mortgage 7.05% 6/10/92 
5,000 U. S. Treasury 8-3/4% 11/15/08 



5,957.69 
22,769.16 
4,856.00 
1,004.30 
2,913.75 
3,825.00 
5,026.27 
1,980.00 
4,875.00 

$ 53.207.17 



240 



Restricted as to Principal 

Union Warren Savings Bank 874.80 

21,000 Federal Nat'l Mortgage 6.40% 12/11/87 20,081.25 

10,000 Federal Nat'l Mortgage 7.05% 6/10/92 9,900.00 

10,000 Southern Cal. Edison Co. 7-1/8% 1/15/94 10,000.00 

10,000 Ohio Power Co. 5% 1/1/96 9,975.00 

5,000 Southern N. E. Tel. 5-3/4% 11/1/96 5,000.00 

10,000 Florida Power and Light Co. 6% 12/1/96 10,000.00 

10,000 Pacific Gas & Electric Co. 4-5/8% 6/1/97 10,000.00 

10,000 Duke Power Co. 7% 2/1/99 10,000.00 

10,000 Southwestern Bell Tel 8^% 3/1/14 9,503.50 

10,000 American Tel & Tel 4-3/4% 6/1/98 10,000.00 

10,000 American Tel & Tel 13^% '91 9,425.00 

Restricted Total 114,759.55 

Unrestricted Total 53,207.17 

$ 167,966.72 



241 



BEMIS LECTURE FUND 

Cash balance at June 30, 1982 

Interest income received 7/1/82-6/30/83 
Interest income received John Todd Fund, FY 83 
Interest applied to amortize bond purchase 
Contribution - Saville Davis 
Withdrawn from MMDT, Composite Trust Fund 



1,435.01 
1,884.96 
3,453.24 
9.40 
250.00 
1,400.00 

$ 8,432.61 



Payments, per order of Trustees 
Honorariums : 

Program Corp. of America (Friedan) 
Museum of Science (Washburn) 
Harvey Brooks 

Printing and Postage 
Audio Visual Aides 
Safe Deposit Box rent 
Interest allowed to accumulate 

Cash balance at June 30, 1983 



1,200.00 






750.00 






1,000.00 






663.64 






203.75 






4.52 






2,925.85 




6,747.76 




$ 


1,684.85 



Cash and Securities at June 30, 1983 



Bay Bank/Middlesex 

MMDT, Composite Trust Funds 

3,000 American Tel & Tel Co. 4-3/8% 4/1/85 

3,000 Niagara Mohawk Power Co. 4-5/8% 5/1/86 

1,000 Virginia Electric & Power Co. 4-1/8% 10/1/86 

2,000 Idaho Power Co. 4^% 1/1/87 

3,000 Western Mass. Electric Co. 4-3/8% 4/1/87 

1,000 Federal Nat'l Mortgage Assn. 6.40% 12/11/87 

1,000 Idaho Power Co. 4-3/4% 11/15/87 

1,000 Alabama Power Co. 3-7/8% 1/1/88 

3,000 Pacific Tel & Tel Co. 4-3/8% 8/15/88 

1,000 So. California Edison Co. 4%% 2/15/90 

3,000 N. E. Power Co. 4-5/8% 11/1/91 

3,000 Federal Nat'l Mortgage Assn. 7.05% 6/10/92 

3,000 Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe RR 4% 10/1/95 

2,000 Commonwealth Edison 8% 8/1/01 



Accumulated income 
Principal 



$ 1,684.85 
5,850.94 
3,004.62 
2,913.75 
1,004.20 
2,000.00 
3,000.00 
956.25 
1,002.31 
1,000.00 
3,024.18 
1,001.04 
3,014.47 
2,970.00 
3,000.00 
1,947.50 

$ 37,374.11 

5,407.04 
31,967.07 



$ 37,374.11 



242 



NOTES 



NOTES 



NOTES 



NOTES 



NOTES 



NOTES 



NOTES 



NOTES 




Hi 









Front Cover: Pen and ink drawing of Sandy Pond and surrounding shore by 

Susanna Schlintz. Much of the land area is part of the receii 
acquisition by the Town of the Sandy Pond Trust land. 

Back Cover: Pen and ink drawing of the Lincoln Boat Club clubhouse by 

Susanna Schlintz, from a photograph taken around the turn of 
the century. The clubhouse was built on the shores of Sandy 
Pond in the 1890' s and contained a boat house on the lower 
level and a dance hall on the floor above. Behind the club- 
house was an ice house, built in 1910 when ice harvesting 
became popular on the pond. 



REPORT 
of the 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 
of the 
TOWN OF LINCOLN 

FOR THE YEAR 1983 




LINCOLN, MASSACHUSETTS 



LINCOLN FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Paul W. Cook, Jr. 

David M. Elwood 

Hamilton R. James 
L. Bruce Long, Jr. 
Lawrence E. Thompson 

Harriet B. Todd 
Sarah Cannon Holden, Chairman 



REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE 

1984 - 1985 

CONTENTS 

I. GENERAL FISCAL OUTLOOK 

A. Revenue Estimates 

B. Budget and Warrant Articles 

C. FY85 Tax Rate 

II. THE BUDGET MAKING PROCESS - FY1985 

A. Revenue Sources in Detail 

B. Proposition 2 1/2 Amendments 

C. Budget Requests — Town 

1. Operating Budget 

2. Debt Service 

3. Salaries & Wages 

D. Budget Requests — Education 

1. Elementary School 

2. Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School 

3. Minuteman Vo-Tech 

III. WARRANT ARTICLES 



REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE 
1984 - 1985 



The Finance Committee is recommending for the first time since the 
implementation of Proposition 2 1/2, budgets and warrant articles which 
do not require the additional revenues of an override. The combination 
of the year-to-year 2 1/2% increase in the tax levy, recent amendments 
to Proposition 2 1/2, and increases in non-tax revenues result in FY85 
funds significantly greater than those in FY84. 

This report is divided into three parts. The first section gives a 
general picture of the revenue estimates, the budget /warrant requests 
and the estimated tax consequences which result. The second section, 
"The Budget Making Process - FY85", presents detailed information 
supporting our revenue estimates and recommended expenditures. The last 
section, "Warrant Articles", wraps up the final dollars available while 
providing a cushion for possible alterations in budgets or requests at a 
future date. 



I. THE GENERAL FISCAL OUTLOOK 



A. Revenue Estimates 



Revenue (000s) 




Actual FY84 


Est. FY85 


Tax Levy Limit 

As Per Prop. 2 1/2 Amends 

Additional Levy (Exempt) 

New Construction 

Other 


$4,495 

73 
1,878 


$4,682 

30 

188 

65 

2,662 


Total Revenue 




$6,446 


$7,217 


Assessments (000s) 








State/County/MBTA 
Overlay 

Other (Snow & Ice; 
Settlement) 


Court 
it 


323 

208 

6 


333 
75 


Total Assessmei 


537 


408 


NET AVAILABLE REVENUE 


$5,896 


$6,809 



The $913,000 in additional revenue this year has resulted in 
increases in the budgets, a substantial increase in warrant article 
requests and no need for an override. Excluding the annual debt service 
payment for the purchase of the Sandy Pond land and the renovations to 
the Codman farmhouse, the total budget is up about 5%. 



B. Budget and Warrant Articles 



Actual FY84 



FY85 



% of Total 
FY84 FY85 



Town 2 , 838 

Schools 2,996 

Warrant Articles 62 

Totals $5,896 



3,349 

3,057 

385 

$6,791 



48% 49% 

51% 45% 

1% 6% 

100% 



For the first time in recent years spending priorities show a 
significant shift. The schools are for the first time drawing upon less 
than 50% of our tax dollars. An increase of $288,000 in annual debt 
service payments accounts for the major portion of the increase in the 
Town budget. Personnel changes account for another significant portion 
of the increase. The 500% increase in warrant article requests follows 
several years of relative restraint. (See "Recent Trends of 
Expenditures and Taxation" in Financial Section & Warrant for the 1983 
Annual Town Meeting for a detailed discussion of patterns over the 
previous ten years.) 

The schools show a decrease because no salary increase is included 
in the elementary school budget. Teacher contracts are being negotiated 
in all three schools at the time of this writing, but the two high 
schools have included estimated increases in their budgets. We do not 
anticipate that the settlements will alter the percentages signficantly. 

Salary increases are included in the "Town" figure above although 
they will actually be voted upon in a warrant article. (See "Warrant 
Articles" at the end of this report.) 

The budgets and warrant articles represent an increase in 
expenditures, including the total increase in the annual debt service, 
of $881,889. We will be recommending cuts in the warrant articles in 
order to come in within the limits of the available revenue while 
allowing for anticipated shifts in some budgets. 



C. FY85 Tax Rate 



We estimate in the following table the FY85 tax rate on a house 
valued this year at $100,000. 



Actual FY84 



FY85 



Change /% 



Tax Rate 
Valuation 
Tax/$100,000 
Valuation 



$16.40 
$100,000 

$1,640 



$16.80 
$105,000 

$1,764 



+$.40/+2.4% 
+5,000/+5% 

+$124/+7% 



The net effect of the increased tax rate and the increased 
property valuation is an estimated increase of 7% in tax for an 
individual tax payer. On a house valued at $100,000 in FY84, an owner 
is paying a tax of $1640. In FY85, the tax on the same property with 
its increased value will be $1764, a $124 increase. 

The Town's total increased property value is net of the loss of 
$1.3 million dollars worth of property from the tax base as a result of 
the purchase in November 1983 of the Sandy Pond Land. The tax 
calculations include the annual debt service payment for this property. 
Although the payment is exempt from the limitations of Proposition 2 
1/2, it still effects the tax rate. The tax impact will be reduced in 
the first year by approximately $100,000, a portion of the $500,000 
received as gifts and pledges from Lincoln residents toward the purchase 
of the land. 

If it were not for this debt service, we project that the taxes 
would be reduced by approximately 40^ from the FY85 estimate or, in 
effect, that there would be no tax increase. 



II. THE BUDGET MAKING PROCESS - FY85 



We worked once again this year with the simple equation which must 
be satisfied in order to fund the spending requests of the Town. 

BUDGET REQUESTS + WARRANT ARTICLES = or < NET AVAILABLE REVENUE 



In late October we proposed our guidelines to the various spending 
centers. At that time we were not fully aware of the revenue picture. 
We urged the Town to hold to an increase not to exceed 5% and the 
elementary schools not to exceed 4%. 

Simultaneously, we began to refine the preparation of the revenue 
estimates. Some aberrations appeared which resulted in revenue 
previously unanticipated. (See section, ."Proposition 2 1/2 
Amendments".) Additionally, the impact of the large unanticipated 
increase in state aid received after the March 1983 Annual Town Meeting 
is being felt in this budget year. The state Tax Bureau recommended 
last summer that we "bank" the unexpected $107,000 in the Overlay (1) 
account. 



(1) Overlay is an account to offset tax abatements or unpaid taxes. 
The unused balance goes into the "Overlay Reserve Account". We can draw 
revenue from it. 



A. Revenue Sources in Detail 



The following table provides the revenue details for FY85 as well 
as for FY84 for comparative purposes. 



Sources 


4 


A-ctual FY84 


Est. FY85 


Property Tax Levy (2 1/2 limit) 


$4,495 


$4,682 


As Per Prop 2 1/2 Amends 





30 


Additional Tax Levy 


(Exempt) 





188 


New Construction 




73 


65 


Motor Vehicle Excise 




210 


250 


User Fees 




195 


250 


Interest 




90 


135 


State Aid 




807 


842 


Free Cash 




230 


290 


Revenue Sharing 




50 


60 


Other (Transfers) 




242 


325 


Overlay Reserve 




41 


100 



Sub-total Revenue 



$6,446 



$7,217 



Uses 



Assessments: State/County/MBTA 323 
Overlay 208 

Other: Snow & Ice; Court Settlement 6 

Sub-total Uses $537 

NET AVAILABLE REVENUE $5,896 



333 
75 



$408 
$6,809 



The net available revenue for FY85 is, 
increase of $913,000. Shifts in revenue 
significant areas. 



therefore, $6,809,000, an 
appear in the following 



Due to Amendments in the Proposition 2 1/2 legislation, we are 
allowed to raise the levy limit by $30,000, the portion of tax revenue 
we did not need and did not raise in the years we voted in favor of the 
override. This is explained in some detail in the section "Proposition 
2 1/2 Amendments" below. 



The Additional Levy is allowed because of the exemption of the 
Sandy Pond/Codman annual debt. We are allowed to raise revenues above 
the 2 1/2 limits to the extent of that debt. $188,000 of the $288,000 
will be raised by taxation. See "Other" below for the source of the 
remaining $100,000. 



New Construction in the Town is taxed at the given tax rate of a 
given fiscal year. The value of new construction for 1983 is estimated 
to be just under $4 million dollars. When taxed at the projected tax 
rate of $16.60, $65,000 in revenue is raised. Next year this "new" 
construction will be added to the overall tax base of the Town. 

Motor Vehicle Excise and User Fees are up with the increase in 
auto purchases and building starts. Interest income is also expected to 
be higher this year. 

The increase in State Aid was announced very early this year and 
so we can count on the 5% increase of $35,500 over last year. 

Free Cash was certified as of June 30, 1983 at $330,000, an amount 
$70,000 larger than last year. At the November 1983 Special Town 
Meeting we used $39,000 in free cash. We propose now to use the 
remaining $290,000. Adjustments will be made before the close of Town 
Meeting in the actual amount of free cash needed to fund the decisions 
made at the meeting. 

The Revenue Sharing dollars have traditionally been used to fund a 
portion of the Town police salaries. This will be done again this year. 

The Other category is the total revenues received from transfers 
from various sources within the Town. Money is received, for instance, 
from the Codman trustees, the Conservation Commission, and, this year 
$100,000 from the gifts received to purchase the Sandy Pond land. 

The $107,000 in unexpected state aid received last year and 
"banked" in Overlay is being transferred to the Overlay Reserve 
Account. $100,000 from this account will fund the FY85 Reserve Fund in 
the Town budget. 



In conclusion, the revenue picture is good. An additional 
$114,869 in revenue from a simple override is not necessary. 



B. Proposition 2 1/2 Amendments 



At the end of 1983, some signficant amendments were made 
to the original Proposition 2 1/2 legislation. The result of the 
amendments is that there can be more local flexibility. The 
amendments which are relevant to Lincoln are as follows. 

Tax Levy Base - The amendments change the base for tax levy 
growth from what a municipality actually taxed in the prior 
year to what it could have taxed. We may now stabilize or 
even reduce taxes if circumstances are favorable without 
impacting Lincoln's future fiscal capacity. Thus, if 
Lincoln's tax levy went up only 2% in one year, it could go up 
3% in the next year because the base will increase even if the 
full taxing capability is not used. In effect, we can build a 
"reserve" of taxing capacity when not taxing to the limit each 
year. If we tax to the limit each year, the increase is 
limited to 2 1/2% of the previous base. This provision 
eliminates a possible temptation to tax to the limit even when 
unnecessary. New construction and non-debt override 
provisions remain unchanged. 

The calculation is retroactive to FY82. The effect on Lincoln 
is that we pick up a "reserve" of $30,000 from previous years 
when we did not tax to the limit of the override. 

Debt Exemption - Proposition 2 1/2 allowed municipalities to 
exempt past debt from their tax levy limit; however, under 
prior wording, such an exemption was subtracted from the 
amount of taxes which could be raised so that communities 
below 2 1/2 which voted to exempt past debt actually faced a 
lower tax levy ceiling and a loss of revenue. The rule 
change, which altered the definition of "total taxes 
assessed" , will enable all cities and towns to take advantage 
of past as well as future debt exemptions by referendum vote. 
Any debt exemption - old and new - is now separate from the 
limits imposed by Proposition 2 1/2. 

The applicability of the rule change to "old debt" would 
permit us (by referendum vote) to remove $150,000 from the 
spending limits imposed by the tax levy limitations of 
Proposition 2 1/2. However, we do not need that relief and we 
do not recommend use of this provision as it relates to old 
debt. 

It was under the provision relating to new borrowing that the 
Sandy Pond and Codman Farmhouse debt of $288,000 was exempted 
by referendum vote in November. 



C. Budget Requests - Town 



With the significant gains in revenue explained in the table in 
Section II. A. of this report, it became apparent that we could budget 
within the allowable revenue limits. An override is necessary only if 
the Town decides to fund the warrant articles in excess of our 
recommendations. We feel that some warrant requests should be postponed 
or abandoned. 

1. Operating Budget 

The increase in the Town operating budget of $538,000 or 19% 
is considerably larger than in recent years. The table and the 
discussion below explain the reasons. 



Distribution of Town Operating Budget Appropriations (000s) 

FY84 & FY85 

Amount Percent of Total 



Activity 


FY84 


FY85 


FY84 


FY85 


General Government 


399 


450 


14.2 


13.4 


Conservation 


108 


110 


3.8 


3.3 


Public Safety 


751 


823 


26.6 


24.5 


Public Works 


468 


491 


16.6 


14.6 


Library 


228 


241 


8.1 


7.2 


Employee Ins. /Pension 


407 


456 


14.4 


13.6 


Prop./Ind. Ins. 


93 


89 


3.3 


2.7 


Debt Service 


158 


439 


5.6 


13.1 


Other 


208 


259 


7.4 


7.6 



Totals $2,820 $3,358 100.0% 100.0% 



In general, the shifts in the budget from FY84 to FY85 come in 
debt service, personnel, and insurance while the budget represents a 
continuation of the same programs. We will discuss here only these 
significant changes. 

Under General Government there is an increase of $7,000 for 

engineering costs and an increase in ten secretarial hours in the 

Planning Board office. The Financial and Clerk's offices each are 

requesting an additional twenty hours of secretarial support. The 

Council on Aging has also requested a ten hour increase in time for its 
coordinator. 

Public Safety has requested an additional person in both the Fire 
and Police Departments at a net additional cost of $10,000 and $18,000, 
respectively. Also in the Fire Department budget is the hydrant fee 
charged to the Town by the Water Department for hydrant installations 
and service. That fee has been increased by $20,000 over last year. 
















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The dramatic increase in Debt Service results from the purchase of 
the Sandy Pond land in November and the renovations proposed on the 
Codman farmhouse. The funding of this debt is explained in the 
following section, "Debt Service". 

Hospital and Health Insurance continues to rise. 

2. Debt Service 

The bar graph in Exhibit 3 shows an extrapolation of annual 
debt service costs to the Town over the next ten years. The Sandy 
Pond payments will be reduced over the life of the bond issue by 
an annual application of a portion of the $500,000 received in 
private pledges and contributions from Lincoln residents. The 
remaining annual debt payment of $188,000 will be paid by taxes. 

We want to make it clear that to exempt debt payments merely 
means that we do not have to include them in our calculations when 
we determine the revenue available within the limits of 
Proposition 2 1/2. In other words, if we exempt $100,000 worth of 
debt, we can spend $100,000 on something else, BUT we still have 
to raise taxes to pay for the $200,000 worth of expenditures. 

3. Salaries and Wages 

The contracts at the time of this writing are not settled. 
All estimated non-school salary increases, union and non-union, 
however, are combined in one warrant article. This is the first 
year in which this arrangement has been made and the intention is 
to increase management flexibility. 

The $72,389 included in the salary warrant article represents 
a percentage increase recommended by the Personnel Board. 



D. Budget Requests - Education 

The Regional High School assessment shows a moderate increase from 
last year, up $37,600 (5%). The Minuteman Vo-Tech assessment increase 
of $16,533 (4%), is up more than anticipated. The Elementary School 
budget, as presented, shows a decrease since no provision has been made 
for teacher salary increases. 

Distribution of Education Appropriations (000s) 



FY84 FY85 

Elementary $2,202 $2,196 

Regional 751 788 

Vo-Tech 42 60 



Totals $2,996 $3,044 



1. Elementary Schools 

Included in the salary budget is the negotiated increase for 
custodians and a $25,000 pool for increases for non-union 
personnel. If the teacher contract negotiations are completed 
before Town Meeting, the final distribution of funds and increases 
can be calculated. 

Significant changes in the budget are: 

$22,300 (+29%) increase in Special Ed transportation & 

tuitions, 
net loss of the equivalence of 1.6 teachers due to a 5.3% 

drop in enrollment from 511 to 484 students. 

One net result of these changes - not accounting for any 
negotiated increase in teacher salaries - is a 5.3% increase in 
the per pupil cost to $4,538. 

2. Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School 

The Regional High School teachers' contract is also currently 
being negotiated. The budget includes an estimated increase in 
the salary line item, but the sum will not be firm until the 
contract is settled. 

The operating budget itself is up 3.2%. On top of the regular 
budget is a $180,000 capital projects fund for work considered 
long overdue by the School Committee. 

Enrollment is at 1307 and is projected to be at 1340 next year 
before showing a decline. While making the above assumptions in 
the Regional budget, the per pupil cost will be $4,859 next year. 

3. Minuteman Vo-Tech High School 

The increase in the total budget is 5.7% of which $266,916 is 
for estimated salary increases currently being negotiated. A loss 
of state aid to the Region has necessitated an 8.5% increase in 
the total assessment to the member towns. Lincoln's portion of 
that assessment is 1.608%, up from 1.242% over last year due also 
because of the enrollment of three additional students. The 
assessment per student is approximately $3,766 up from $3,298 in 
FY84. 



To the extent that the contracts as finally negotiated contain 
salary increases in excess of provisions made in the individual school 
budgets, action at a Special Town Meeting may be required. 



10 



III. WARRANT ARTICLES 



The warrant articles requiring tax appropriations are listed 
below. The net available revenue after satisfying the budget requests 
is $414,111. The total warrant requests come to $385,650. It is here in 
the consideration of warrant articles that the exemption of the Sandy 
Pond/Codman debt can be so clearly felt. If we were not allowed or had 
not voted to exempt that debt, we would have only $126,111 available for 
warrant requests or $288,000 less than is the case. Because that debt 
falls outside the limits of Proposition 2 1/2 we can treat it as 
additional available revenue. Therefore, we do not have to face major 
cuts in either budget or warrant requests. 

However, it must be remembered that there is no provision thus far 
in these calculations for any increase in the salaries of the elementary 
school teachers. We do not know what that sum will finally be, but we 
do know that for every 1% increase, approximately $14,000 is needed in 
the budget. 

We have listed the Town salary warrant article here, but the 
$72,389 is not included in the warrant total because we have already 
accounted for it in the Town budget total above. It is included here so 
that a clear record of all money warrant articles is made in this report. 

Also included below is the warrant article for the purchase of the 
Ricci land. We have no dollar figure at this time, but we do not 
anticipate that there will be costs during this fiscal year. If the 
debt is to be exempted, it will have to be voted by referendum at the 
election following the Town Meeting. The cost will be added to the debt 
service costs presented in the bar graph in Exhibit 3. 

1. Library $48,150 

2. Hazardous Waste 2,300 

3. Traffic Studies 15,000 

4. Town Barn Improvements 25,000 

5. Vehicles 190,500 

Fire Engine 125,000 
Backhoe 35,000 

Bucket Truck 15,000 

($15,000 represents the first year leasing costs on a truck 
which would cost $65,000 to buy outright.) 
Cruiser 11,000 

Dog Officer Vehicle 4,500 

6. Town Building Repair 15,000 

7. Town Building Dept. Consolidation 25,000 

8. Telemetry 8,700 

9. Pool Committee 5,000 

10. Recreation Director 11,000 

11. Underground Wiring 40,000 

TOTAL $385,650 

12. Town Salary Increase 72,389 

13. Ricci Land Purchase 



11 



In order not to be forced into an override to fund the unknown 
elemetary school salary increases, we recommend that certain of the 
above articles not be funded at this time. We will make our final 
recommendations in a hand-out at Town Meeting. We anticipate that 
between $50,000 and $60,000 will have to be cut. 



In this first year as a seven member committee we have found the 
addition of two people to have been helpful. Our system of liaison 
assignments to most of the Town and School boards and committees worked 
effectively to distribute the work and the meetings among us. 

In conclusion, we wish to express our deep appreciation to the 
staff at the Town Offices who have always willingly and promptly 
supplied us with all the information and support we have requested. 
Bill Hinchey, Executive Secretary, Ginny Niles, Assistant Executive 
Secretary, Betty Lang, Town Accountant, and Pam Bateman, Secretary to 
the Selectmen, have each helped us to sort out the information we need 
to make our decisions and compile this report. Our task is eased 
because of the general spirit of cooperation among all Town boards and 
committees whose budgets we review. 

Paul W. Cook, Jr. 

David M. Elwood 

Hamilton R. James 

L. Bruce Long, Jr. 

Lawrence E. Thompson 

Harriet B. Todd 

Sarah Cannon Holden, Chairman 



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23 






WARRANT 
1984 NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, ss 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln in said County: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify the 
legal voters of said Town of Lincoln qualified to vote in Town Meeting for 
the transaction of Town Affairs to meet in the Brooks School Auditorium in 
said Lincoln on Saturday, the twenty-fourth of March next, at 9:30 a.m., 
then and there to act on the following articles, except Article 1, and 
also to meet at the Smith School Gymnasium on Monday, the twenty-sixth day 
of March next, at 7:30 a.m., then and there to act on the following 
Article 1, by posting a copy of this Warrant, by you attested, in said 
Town, seven days at least before the twenty-fourth day of March next. 

The polls for voting the Australian ballot on Monday, March twenty-sixth, 
will be opened at 7:30 a.m. and will be closed at 8:00 p.m. 

ARTICLE 1. To bring in their votes for one or more members for each 
of the following offices: 

Moderator for three years 

Town Clerk for one year 

Selectman for three years 

Treasurer for one year 

Assessor for three years 

Assessor for two years 

School Committee (2) for three years each 

Water Commissioner for three years 

Board of Health for three years 

Cemetery Commissioner for three years 

Planning Board for five years 

Commissioner of Trust Funds for three years 

Trustee of Bemis Fund for three years 

DeCordova Museum for four years 

Recreation Committee for three years 

Recreation Committee for two years 

Regional School Committee (2) for three years each 



24 



and also the following questions: 

(1) "Shall the Town of Lincoln be allowed to assess an 
additional $114,869 in real estate and personal property taxes for the 
fiscal year beginning July 1st, nineteen hundred and eighty-four?" 

(2) "Shall the Town of Lincoln be allowed to exempt the 
amounts required to pay for the bond issued in order to acquire for 
highway purposes or other municipal purposes, certain parcels of land 
owned by Louis, Fred and Charles Ricci situated off Bedford Road and North 
Great Road (Route 2A) adjacent to Minuteman National Historical Park, 
containing approximately 105 acres?" 



ARTICLE 2. To bring in their votes for any Committees, Commissioners, 

Trustees, and other officers required by law to be elected 
by ballot or otherwise. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 3. To hear and act upon the reports of the Town Officers, 
Committees, Commissioners, and Trustees. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 4. To fix the salaries and compensation of the several 

elective officers of the Town and to determine whether 
any Department, Board or Committee shall be authorized to employ for 
additional compensation any of its members and to fix additional 
compensation of such members. 

ARTICLE 5. To raise and appropriate money for the necessary and 

expedient purposes of the Town, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Finance Committee 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money, in addition to that authorized under Article 
5 of this Warrant, to provide (1) pay increases for union employees as 
required by collective bargaining agreements and (2) general and merit 
pay increases for non-union employees as may be granted by the Selectmen 
and/or the Library Trustees, or take any other action relative thereto. 



Selectmen, Library Trustees 

7 J, OO-O "~ft. 






25 



ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town 

Treasurer with the appproval of the Selectmen, to borrow 
money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial 
year beginning July 1, 1984, in accordance with the provisions of General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, as amended, and to issue a note or notes 
therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note or notes as may 
be given for a period of less than one year, in accordance with General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17, as amended. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Selectmen 
and the School Committee to continue the Town's annual 
contract with the Secretary of Defense to operate the elementary school at 
Hanscom Air Force Base, Bedford, Massachusetts, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

School Committee and Selectmen 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to support the School 
Committee in its continuing plan to bring a limited number 
of children from Boston to Lincoln Schools for purposes of education, or t 
take any other action relative thereto. 

' 4 x * 

School Committee 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof to purchase equipment and 
services to enable the Lincoln Public Library to participate in an auto- 
mated network of area libraries called the Minuteman Library Network and 
to pay for cost of Town's Fiscal Year 1984-85 operating expenses for said 
network, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Library Trustees 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money by taxation, borrowing or by transfer of 
other available funds or any combination of those methods to acquire by 
purchase, gift, eminent domain or in any other way for highway purposes or 
other municipal purposes, certain parcels of land owned by Louis, Fred and 
Charles Ricci situated off Bedford Road and North Great Road (Route 2A) , 
adjacent to Minuteman National Historic Park, containing approximately „L05 
acres, or take any action relative thereto. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof for the purchase and 
installation of cables to be used for fire alarm signals and Water Depart- 
ment telemetry, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen, Water Commissioners 



26 



t 

& 



1 



ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available funds 
or any combination thereof for the construction, reconstruction, and/or 
maintenance and repair of roads and bridges and the enforcement of traffic 
laws and that the Treasurer be authorized to borrow in anticipation of 
reimbursement by the Commonwealth under Chapter 283, Acts of 1976, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to approve amendments to the 

by-laws of the DeCordova and Dana Museum and Park which 
have been adopted by the Corporation setting forth the duties of the 
Director of the Museum and providing that any trustee (resident or non- 
resident) is eligible to serve as an officer of the Corporation, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Board of Directors 
DeCordova & Dana Museum & Park 



ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a 
sum of money by transfer from available funds to complete 
a pre-school playground adjacent to the swimming pool parking area, or 
take any other relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to change from an R-l Single 
Family Residence District to an R-2 General Residence 
District the parcel of land described below and to amend the Zoning Map of 
the Town to reflect those changes, or take any action relative thereto. 

A certain parcel of land owned by the Rural Land Foundation of Lincoln and 
shown outlined in red on a plan entitled, "Plan of Land in Lincoln, 
Massachusetts", dated July 11, 1979, and revised February 1981 by Clever- 
don, Varney & Pike, Consulting Engineers. 

By Petition 



27 



ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sun of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof to make improvements to the 
Town Barn yard and to construct an addition to the Town Barn, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof for the purchase of equip- 
ment to be used by various departments, and to see if the Town will 
authorize the disposal by sale or otherwise, of excess vehicles and equip- 
ment, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen, Water Commissioners 



ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds or any combination thereof to purchase or lease an aerial bucket 
truck for the use of the Department of Public Works, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof to provide a one-day, 
townwide hazardous waste collection, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof for renovations to the Town 
Offices building or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 14.3 - 
Accessory Apartments in an R-l District - of the Zoning 
By-Laws as most recently amended on November 15, 1983, by substituting the 
date "January 1, 1984" in Section 14.3.2(F) in place of the date "January 
1, 1978", or take any other action relative thereto. 

Planning Board 



28 



ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money for maintenance and improvements in the 
Lincoln Cemeteries, said sum to be taken from accumulated funds from the 
sale of cemetery lots and held in a fund known as the Cemetery Improvement 
Fund, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Cemetery Commissioners 



ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof to remove certain overhead 
wires and poles in Lincoln Center and place them underground and to relo- 
cate certain wires on new poles in the vicinity of Lincoln Center and 
Library Lane, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, or any combination thereof to be added to the amount appropriated 
under Article 5, Line Item 600, Recreation Salaries, to provide funds for 
the Recreation Committeee to employ a Recreation Director, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Recreation Committee 



ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof to design a bath house 
facility at the Codman Pool complex; and to accept gifts for the construc- 
tion of said bath house facility, or take any other action relative there- 
to. 

Pool Committee 



ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof for planning and studies of 
traffic issues and related land use concerns or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Planning Board 



ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof for the repair and mainte- 
nance of certain Town buildings, or take any other action relative there- 
to. 

Selectmen 



29 



ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 2 of Article 
VII of its General By-Laws (Legal Affairs) which empowers 
the Selectmen to compromise or settle any claim or suit to which the Town 
is a party, by deleting the sum of $1,000 wherever it appears and inser- 
ting in its place the sum of $5,000, thereby increasing the maximum amount 
for which a settlement may be made by the Selectmen, except as otherwise 
provided by law, without the consent of a Town Meeting, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to urge its representatives 
in Congress to halt funding for the testing and deployment 
of nuclear weapons, contingent upon a corresponding Soviet halt in testing 
and deployment of nuclear weapons, as a first step toward a comprehensive, 
bilateral, verifiable freeze which includes cessation of the production of 
all nuclear weapons and toward eventual nuclear disarmament. 

By Petition 



Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with your doings thereon 
to the Town Clerk, at or before the time for the meeting aforesaid. Given 
under our hands this twenty-first day of February in the year of our Lord 
one thousand nine hundred eighty-four. 



John R. Caswell 

John A. Ritsher 

Ann F. Sutherland, Chairman 

SELECTMEN OF LINCOLN 



30 






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